2.1 Protocols

Message passing is the simplest form of development paradigm. For example, the way that a client running a browser communicates with a web server is via message passing.

Message passing is based on the idea of a protocol: a language which embodies the functions required by one entity in a distributed system (usually a client) which another entity provides (usually a server). As an example of a protocol consider Table 1. It shows the protocol associated with a naming servi
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and/or otherwise stated (see terms and conditions) the content in OpenLearn is released for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share

7.2.7 Information brokerage

Websites described by this business model offer access to information – usually business information. For example, a website which offers the results of surveys of customer satisfaction for a product such as a car would be used by car hire companies, auto companies and consumer organisations. Major providers in this area provide information derived from financial data such as company performance figures, pension fund performance figures and financial market trends such as the growth of diff
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and/or otherwise stated (see terms and conditions) the content in OpenLearn is released for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share

7.2.4 E-mall

An electronic mall or e-mall is a collection of e-shops which are often devoted to a specific service or product, for example an e-mall might be devoted to selling goods associated with a leisure activity such as fishing. Usually e-malls are organised by a company which charges the e-shops for administering their presence: maintaining the website, hosting the e-mall, and providing payment and transaction facilities and marketing.

The e-mall operator gains revenue for charging the e-shop
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and/or otherwise stated (see terms and conditions) the content in OpenLearn is released for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share

7.2.2 E-auction

This model describes sites which electronically simulate the bidding process in a conventional physical auction. Such sites can range in sophistication from those which present a simple catalogue of items to those which offer multimedia presentations. Most sites which are described by this business model are concerned with selling items to individual consumers. However, there are an increasing number of sites which provide facilities for businesses to auction products to other businesses.


Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and/or otherwise stated (see terms and conditions) the content in OpenLearn is released for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share

Learning outcomes

After studying this unit you should be able to:

  • understand what writing an assignment involves;

  • identify their strength and weaknesses;

  • consider the functions of essays and reports;

  • develop writing skills, whatever the stage they have reached.


Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and/or otherwise stated (see terms and conditions) the content in OpenLearn is released for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share

6.2.1 Quoting from written texts

We have seen that when you are discussing a poem, you talk about its ‘rhythms’ or movement, its patterns of sound such as ‘rhyme’, and its ‘imagery’ and ‘syntax’, quoting words, phrases and lines from the poem as evidence of the points you want to make about it. And this applies to play-texts and novels, too. As you discuss the ‘characters’ involved, you quote parts of their ‘dialogue’ or passages from the ‘narrator's’ descriptions of them. You also quote
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and/or otherwise stated (see terms and conditions) the content in OpenLearn is released for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share

Introduction

Social scientists collect evidence to support their claims and theories in different ways. Such evidence is crucial to the practice of social science and to the production of social scientific knowledge.

You may be aware of the idea of active reading, which is about reading with the aim of understanding and grasping something: a definition, an argument, a piece of evidence. What that suggests is that active reading is about reading and thinking at the same time. In
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and/or otherwise stated (see terms and conditions) the content in OpenLearn is released for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share

3.2 Maps and the circuit of knowledge

Activity 3

The circuit of knowledge starts with a question or questions. For example, look at Figure 1 and Map 3, A and B. Figure 1 shows how the circuit of knowledge can be used to investigate a question, using Map 3, A and B, as e
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and/or otherwise stated (see terms and conditions) the content in OpenLearn is released for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share

Introduction

This unit looks at the prevalence of maps in everyday life, their uses and their importance. From mental maps to public transport and street maps it moves on to historical and history-making maps. Along with assessing the political importance of some maps it examines how we read maps and looks at how to evaluate the information contained within them. Although maps might seem to be objective and factual the unit looks at the values embedded in both maps themselves and our perceptions of them.<
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and/or otherwise stated (see terms and conditions) the content in OpenLearn is released for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share

References

Claiborne, R. (1983; this edition 1990) The Life and Times of the English Language: The History of our Marvellous Native Tongue, Bloomsbury.
Tolkien, J. R. R. (1954; this edition 2003) The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers, HarperCollins.
Bodmer, F. (1943) The Loom of Language, London: Allen & Unwin (republished Merlin Press, 1981).
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and/or otherwise stated (see terms and conditions) the content in OpenLearn is released for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share

Introduction

This unit explores school geography, focusing upon how geography is currently being taught and understood. While studying this unit you will read about the significance of geography as a subject, considering what are the defining concepts for school geography and its educational value. The unit also includes a lesson plan and a look at definitions of geography as a medium of education.


Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and/or otherwise stated (see terms and conditions) the content in OpenLearn is released for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share

5 Giving feedback

In order to develop and improve dance skills, students should also be involved in evaluating one another's, and their own, work.

Performing for one another in class as part of an evaluation and feedback process can be beneficial to both the students and teacher.

When done on a regular basis, students can become less self-conscious about performing in front of others; this is important in terms of building confidence in young performers.

Feedback is an important part of the i
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and/or otherwise stated (see terms and conditions) the content in OpenLearn is released for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share

Learning outcomes

The learning outcomes for this unit are:

  • Critically appreciate the significance of claims made for ‘global corporate citizenship’.

  • Understand the nature of work and ‘social citizenship’.

  • Recognize the difference between ‘acts citizenship’ and ‘status citizenship’.

  • Be able to assess the ‘ethical dimension’ to arguments about citizenship.

  • See the relevance of historical comparisons for understanding co
    Author(s): The Open University

    License information
    Related content

    Except for third party materials and/or otherwise stated (see terms and conditions) the content in OpenLearn is released for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share

5.3 Actividad

Actividad 5.2

1 Look at the following picture of a bar. Write down what you see, using the structure hay + un/una.

Observe y escriba.


Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and/or otherwise stated (see terms and conditions) the content in OpenLearn is released for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share

4.8.2 Word clusters

Actividad 4.7

Which of the following adjectives go with the nouns below? Cross the odd one out. The first has been done for you.

Tache el intruso.

Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and/or otherwise stated (see terms and conditions) the content in OpenLearn is released for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share

2.2 Actividad

Actividad 2.1

1 Here are some pictures of famous monuments. Say whether you think they are in Latin America or in Spain. See how many you can guess.

Escriba dónde están los monumentos.


Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and/or otherwise stated (see terms and conditions) the content in OpenLearn is released for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share

1.4.1 About Español de bolsillo

Below is the first example of Español de bolsillo ('Pocket Spanish' phrasebook). These are lists of phrases common in spoken Spanish. They usually consist of expressions best approached as complete phrases even if some of the grammar within them is not yet familiar to you.

Each example of Español de bolsillo has a box in which are written the phrases in Spanish and translated and an audio clip in which you can hear them spoken.

  • Y
    Author(s): The Open University

    License information
    Related content

    Except for third party materials and/or otherwise stated (see terms and conditions) the content in OpenLearn is released for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share

1.1 Autour d'Avignon

In this session, you and and your friend Christine are exploring Avignon. You look at the town plan opposite the station, and Christine stops a passer-by to ask for help.

Key Learning Points

  • Asking for and understanding directions

  • Using être

  • Making liaisons

Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and/or otherwise stated (see terms and conditions) the content in OpenLearn is released for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share

1.8.2 ‘Props’ to support a performance

Heller leaves no doubt about the horror and panic produced by a situation where action was urgently called for, yet there was no framework within which to construct action. He found himself desperately casting around for things to do, falling back on his trusty stethoscope as a way to ‘play doctor’, but finding it inadequate for the circumstances. He was clearly relieved when the drip equipment arrived, giving him a structured role. And even in this desperate situation he was concerned to
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and/or otherwise stated (see terms and conditions) the content in OpenLearn is released for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share