2.2 Actividad

Actividad 2.1

1 Here are some pictures of famous monuments. Say whether you think they are in Latin America or in Spain. See how many you can guess.

Escriba dónde están los monumentos.


Author(s): The Open University

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1.4.1 About Español de bolsillo

Below is the first example of Español de bolsillo ('Pocket Spanish' phrasebook). These are lists of phrases common in spoken Spanish. They usually consist of expressions best approached as complete phrases even if some of the grammar within them is not yet familiar to you.

Each example of Español de bolsillo has a box in which are written the phrases in Spanish and translated and an audio clip in which you can hear them spoken.

  • Y
    Author(s): The Open University

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1.1 Autour d'Avignon

In this session, you and and your friend Christine are exploring Avignon. You look at the town plan opposite the station, and Christine stops a passer-by to ask for help.

Key Learning Points

  • Asking for and understanding directions

  • Using être

  • Making liaisons

Author(s): The Open University

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1.8.2 ‘Props’ to support a performance

Heller leaves no doubt about the horror and panic produced by a situation where action was urgently called for, yet there was no framework within which to construct action. He found himself desperately casting around for things to do, falling back on his trusty stethoscope as a way to ‘play doctor’, but finding it inadequate for the circumstances. He was clearly relieved when the drip equipment arrived, giving him a structured role. And even in this desperate situation he was concerned to
Author(s): The Open University

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1.8.1 The experience of Hillsborough

We have explored the challenges of entering into situations which are ambiguous and open to competing interpretations. But what happens in a situation where nobody knows what is going on, where established meanings have collapsed altogether? Tom Heller gives a graphic account of such a situation in his description of his experience of the Hillsborough football stadium disaster.

Click on 'view document' below to read Tom Heller's account of his experiences at Hillsborough.

Author(s): The Open University

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1.5.5 The modern day relationship

However, things have been changing since Stein outlined the doctor-nurse game. A more recent study in Sweden reported that:

In our investigation, the nurses who had been working for 15–20 years often emphasised that it was during the past 8–10 years that marked changes had occurred in their interplay with doctors. Relations in former times are described in terms such as: ‘one had to stand on tiptoe’, ‘the
Author(s): The Open University

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1.5 Moving forward?

So far you have read about the development of consultation with service users. Why, then, do service users and their organisations experience a struggle to be heard? What barriers are they encountering?

Service providers may structure consultation around service needs rather than service users' interests. For example, consultation at the planning, delivery and monitoring stages of a new day centre might be informative to service providers as well as a good example of service user involv
Author(s): The Open University

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Introduction

The current political agenda requires service users' views to be incorporated into the design of health and social care services (Department of Health, 2006). Services are assessed by the quality of the outcomes they provide for users. Frontline managers are responsible for gathering service user views on their needs. Whose views should be taken into account? How do managers gather views? This unit helps you consider ways of getting feedback from service users, and shows the inclusive approac
Author(s): The Open University

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Learning outcomes

By the end of this unit you should be able to:

  • begin to recognise how elite sport is funded in the UK.


Author(s): The Open University

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3.5 Benzodiazepine tranquillisers, Prozac and the SSRIs

One of the most significant ranges of drugs ever produced is the benzodiazepine tranquillisers (usually classed as ‘minor tranquillisers’ or ‘hypnotics’), often prescribed as a remedy for ‘minor’ disorders such as depression, sleeplessness and anxiety. In effect, they extended the range of conditions that could be treated by medication. The best-known example is probably Valium.

3.19 Key ethical issues for CAM practitioners: professional etiquette and whistleblowing

In the past, professional bodies cautioned their members against disparaging other members of the same profession in front of a user. In the UK many codes of ethics still discuss professional etiquette from the perspective of safeguarding the interests of the practitioner rather than the user. Sensitivity is required when treating a user who is dissatisfied with a previous practitioner, but this should not prevent a practitioner being critical of someone else's obviously unacceptable treatmen
Author(s): The Open University

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3.16 Key ethical issues for CAM practitioners: consent for children receiving CAM

Growing numbers of parents seek CAM for their children, as witnessed by the development of paediatric specialities in some CAM therapies, such as neonatal and paediatric osteopathy. A key ethical issue is that, in the UK, as in other jurisdictions, parents are entrusted to act as proxy decision makers for their children's health decisions until they can make their own choices. Parents are bound by law to make decisions in their children's best interests. Although most CAM therapies are relati
Author(s): The Open University

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1.2.4 Checklist of common features

  • Is there any online help?

  • Can I do a simple search?

  • Can I look at the information in both short and detailed form?

  • Can I choose where in the record I want my search terms to be found?

  • Can I search for phrases?

  • Can I combine search terms?

  • Can I use truncation?

  • Can I use wildcards?

  • Can I do an advanced search?

  • <
    Author(s): The Open University

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Learning outcomes

On completion of this unit you will have:

  • examined the place play has in the curriculum framework/guidance or documents most relevant to your setting;

  • considered various definitions of play;

  • explored ideas about the value of play and adults' attitudes towards play;

  • considered play in your setting and attempted to access children's perceptions of play;

  • explored issues such as gender and play and children's right to play.
    Author(s): The Open University

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Introduction

From an early age, play is important to a child's development and learning. It isn't just physical. It can involve cognitive, imaginative, creative, emotional and social aspects. It is the main way most children express their impulse to explore, experiment and understand. Children of all ages play.

(Dobson, 2004, p.8)

This material is from our archive and is an adapted extract from Devel
Author(s): The Open University

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3.3 The mental health of young black men

According to the Health Development Agency, ‘Young black men are over-represented in the mental health statistics’ (Health Development Agency, 2001, p. 36), particularly in terms of diagnosis for schizophrenia, which is generally three times higher for the African-Caribbean population than for the UK white population (Nazroo, 1997). Young black men are over-represented in hospital admissions for mental health problems, contact with psychiatry via the police, courts and prison, and at the
Author(s): The Open University

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3.2 Gender and young people's mental health

The discussion of eating disorders and schooling in Section 2 suggested that gendered relations of power, both in an institution such as a secondary school and in society at large, could contribute to the development of particular health problems for some groups of young people. The article by Evans et al. (2004) presented young people'
Author(s): The Open University

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Absolute Beginner #9 - We Aren’t Going to Spanish Class Today
Learn Spanish with SpanishPod101.com! You wake up and it’s early Friday morning, and the warm Latin American sun is already streaming into your bedroom. You yawn, rub your eyes, and open your window…and suddenly it comes to you…you’re going to skip your Spanish class today! You open your window and yell out to the world [...]
Author(s): SpanishPod101.com

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Rights not set

1.2 Actions

In Activity 1 below, the purpose is to observe and identify some of the actions or interventions that adults make in their day-to-day work with young people. Some examples of these individual actions are:

  • making contact

  • listening

  • suggesting

  • giving information

  • challenging assumptions.

Click in the box below to start playing the video.

Author(s): The Open University

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Ping 161: Scroogled, Xbox sales, Windows Store wins, IE 10 trolls | Ping!

Laura and Paul bring you all the top stories- but it's YOU we want to hear from! Check out the latest episode and then jump in on the conversation...don't be shy, we like you, promise. Here are some convo kick starters:

Scroogled!  [05:22]

Author(s): Laura Foy