Educomics - Using digital comics in the classroom

Educomics is a European Union education project which will show educators how online comics can be used in the classroom. It has developed resource materials to support teachers in their use of digital comics.

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How Did English Evolve?
What is the difference between "a hearty welcome" and "a cordial reception"? In a brief, action-packed history of the English language, Kate Gardoqui explains why these semantically equal phrases evoke such different images.  (05:04)

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Music Visualization using Independent Component Analysis
Rene Castro
Elec 301 Project on Music Visualization Using Independent Component Analysis
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Shorty Award Campaign Video for @OleMissRebels
@OleMissRebels is nominated for a Shorty Award in the #BNcollege category! Launch us to the top by tweeting a nomination here: http://shortyawards.com/OleMissRebels.
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McMaster Welcome Speeches: Dr. Patrick Deane, President and Vice Chancellor
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Concert in Your Cranium
Watch here as experimental musician Mark Stewart of Polygraph Lounge plays a duet of every member of our audience. Using a small instrument of his own design, Mark teaches participants to use the bones in their skull as a resonator, creating 200 individual creative experiences.  (02:25)

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Public Perceptions of Privacy
Would you give somebody your bank PIN for a candy bar? Cryptanalyst Orr Dunkelman tells the cryptography panel about a surprising study that found that most people would. Why is that? Perhaps because this bit of information is just one part of a system that may also require their
name, address, card number, and so on, they assume it is safe to share this one detail. But in today’s information-based world, where much of one’s personal information is available at the click of a

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Market Pulse: 12/12/12, a red letter day for Greek bonds
It's perhaps fitting that today Greek bond yields have a 12% handle for the first time since April last year. And is 88 years enough for progress on the "fiscal cliff" talks?
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4.3.4 Wetlands

Wetlands can be used in a similar way to buffer strips as a pollution control mechanism. They often present a relatively cost-effective and practical option for treatment, particularly in environmentally sensitive areas where large waste-water treatment plants are not acceptable. For example, Lake Manzala in Egypt has been suffering from severe pollution problems for several years. This lake is located on the northeastern edge of the Nile Delta, between Damietta and Port Said. Land reclamatio
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4.4.1 Diversion of effluent

In some circumstances it may be possible to divert sewage effluent away from a water body in order to reduce nutrient loads. This was achieved at Lake Washington, near Seattle, USA, which is close to the sea. Lake Washington is surrounded by Seattle and its suburbs, and in 1955 a cyanobacterium, Oscitilloria rubescens, became dominant in the lake. The lake was receiving sewage effluent from about 70 000 people; this input represented about 56% of the total phosphorus load to the lake.
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3.3 Mechanisms of eutrophication

Direct effects of eutrophication occur when growth of organisms (usually the primary producers) is released from nutrient limitation. The resulting increased NPP becomes available for consumers, either as living biomass for herbivores or as detritus for detritivores. Associated indirect effects occur as eutrophication alters the food supply for other consumers. Changes in the amount, relative abundance, size or nutritional content of the food supply influence competitive relationships between
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3.2.5 Sediments

Sediments have a variable but complex role in nutrient cycling in most aquatic systems, and are a potential ‘internal’ source of pollutants. Release of phosphorus from lake sediment is a complex function of physical, biological and chemical processes and is not easy to predict for different systems. Nitrogen is not stored and released from sediments in the same way, so its turnover time within aquatic systems is quite rapid. Nitrogen concentrations tend to fall off relatively quickly foll
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3.1 Agents of eutrophication

Light availability, water availability, temperature and the supply of plant nutrients are the four most important factors determining NPP. Altered availability of nutrients affects the rate of primary production in all ecosystems, which in turn changes the biomass and the species composition of communities.

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2.4.1 Estuarine species

Nutrient runoff from the land is a major source of nutrients in estuarine habitats. Shallow-water estuaries are some of the most nutrient-rich ecosystems on Earth, due to coastal development and the effects of urbanization on nutrient runoff. Figure 2.19 shows some typical nitrogen pathways. Nitrogen loadings in rainfall are typically assimilated by plants or denitrified, but septic tanks tend to add nitrogen below the reach of plant roots, and if situated near the coast or rivers can lead to
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2.1.1 Loss of submerged plant communities

One of the symptoms of extreme eutrophication in shallow waters is often a substantial or complete loss of submerged plant communities and their replacement by dense phytoplankton communities (algal blooms). This results not only in the loss of characteristic plant species (macrophytes) but also in reduced habitat structure within the water body. Submerged plants provide refuges for invertebrate species against predation by fish. Some of these invertebrate species are phytoplankton-grazers an
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1.4 Human-induced eutrophication

While eutrophication does occur independently of human activity, increasingly it is caused, or amplified, by human inputs. Human activities are causing pollution of water bodies and soils to occur to an unprecedented degree, resulting in an array of symptomatic changes in water quality and in species and communities of associated organisms. In 1848 W. Gardiner produced a flora of Forfarshire, in which he described the plants growing in Balgavies Loch. He talked of ‘potamogetons [pondweeds]
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1.2 Resource availability and species diversity

A wide range of ecosystems has been studied in terms of their species diversity and the availability of resources. Each produces an individual relationship between these two variables, but a common pattern emerges from most of them, especially when plant diversity is being considered. This pattern has been named the humped-back relationship and suggests diversity is greatest at intermediate levels of productivity in many systems (Figure 1.5).

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8.3 Chromosome distribution within the nucleus

DNA from any one particular chromosome is a single chain, many millions of bases long, and this chain is attached to a scaffold structure. It is not surprising then, that if we examine the interphase nucleus, each chromosome is seen to fill a localised area. This localised distribution of individual chromosomes is illustrated in Figure 42 with an examination of human chromosomes within the interphase nucleus. In these examples, special DNA probes have been used to detect the location of the e
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8.2 Chromosome scaffolds

Most of the chromosomal DNA chains within the interphase nucleus are believed to be held on a scaffold or backbone structure made from various proteins, with loops of between 20 and 200 kb extruding from attachment sites. This chromosome structure is shown schematically in Figure 40. The scaffold, as well as permitting further compaction, serves to bring the DNA together in organised regions. There are many different protein components of these scaffolds, amongst them DNA topoisomerases.


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