A strategy for ridding the world of VAD?

In July 2000, Time magazine announced that a potential solution to VAD had been found - 'Golden Rice' (Figure 8). This was a variety of rice that had been genetically modified to introduce β-carotene into the endosperm (part of the grain of the rice). The name arises from the fact that the otherwise white grains of rice are given a golden colour by the presence of carotenoid compounds.

The announcement came at the height of the global controversy over genetically modified crops.
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Using chemistry to rescue ancient artefacts
This week in the Planet Earth Podcast: Kirsty Penkman, Kirsty High and Nicky Milner of the University of York explain how chemistry can be used to work out which archaeological sites need urgent excavation to save artefacts from degrading.
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Eiffel Tower CVS01_01_076

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Eiffel Tower, Paris, taken from a tethered balloon. Shadbolt recorded this image as 'Photograph of Paris Exhibition with Eiffel Tower taken from captive balloon', dated to the final day of the Exposition Universelle - 6 November 1889. The Eiffel Tower had been completed in March 1889 as the centrepiece of the Exposition. From the Cecil Victor Shadbolt collection of lantern s
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2 How active should young people be?

Physical activity in childhood has a range of benefits, including healthy growth and development, maintenance of a healthy weight, mental well-being and learning social skills. It is particularly important for bone health, increasing bone mineral density and preventing osteoporosis in later life. Although there is only indirect evidence (compared with adults) linking physical inactivity in children with childhood health outc
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1.3.8 Choosing the right tool for the job

Before searching it is always a good idea to check what the source you have chosen covers to make sure it will unearth information that matches your search need (you will notice that all the resources we’ve covered in this guide have short descriptions to enable you to decide which to use). Some of the decision makers, depending on the context of your search might be:

  • Does it have full text?

  • Does it cover the right subject?


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Vanderbilt University community gathers for VU Eclipse 2017
Vanderbilt University students, faculty, and staff joined together to witness a once-in-a-lifetime event: a total solar eclipse.
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Rights not set

3.2 Removal of iron

Before leaving enterobactin to look at iron transport and storage in humans, it is worth asking the question: how does E. coli remove the iron from such a stable complex as the iron(III)–enterobactin once it has been absorbed?

The answer to this question can be found if we look back to reaction 38. The rigid, three-dimensional structure of the triserine ring of enterobactin is the main reason why enterobactin is such an effective ligand. If the structure of the ring is destroye
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7.1 Health problems associated with using chemicals

As described in Section 6.2, hazard is defined under COSHH as the inherently dangerous properties of a chemical or biological organism, and risk is defined as the likelihood of a chemical causing harm to people or to the environment.

There are several, more specific, known health problems associated with using chemicals.
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1.4 Human-induced eutrophication

While eutrophication does occur independently of human activity, increasingly it is caused, or amplified, by human inputs. Human activities are causing pollution of water bodies and soils to occur to an unprecedented degree, resulting in an array of symptomatic changes in water quality and in species and communities of associated organisms. In 1848 W. Gardiner produced a flora of Forfarshire, in which he described the plants growing in Balgavies Loch. He talked of 'potamogetons [pondweeds] fl
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First-order differential equations

This unit introduces the topic of differential equations. The subject is developed without assuming that you have come across it before, but it is taken for granted that you have a basic grounding in calculus. In particular, you will need to have a good grasp of the basic rules for differentiation and integration.

This study unit is an adapted extract from the Open University course MST209 Mathematical methods and models, which is no longer taught by the University. If you want t
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2.2.1 Finance

Every time you use a debit or credit card the shop till uses a terminal connected to other computers via a network. Your identification details are automatically transferred from your card to your bank or credit card company for verification, and your balance adjusted accordingly. This also applies if you are shopping online, or over the phone (when booking a cinema ticket, for example). ATMs (also known as cashpoints) allow you to check your bank balance or withdraw cash from wherever you ar
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Introduction

This free course, An introduction to law in contemporary Scotland, will introduce you to the law making process in Scotland. The Scottish legal system and many aspects of the law in Scotland are different from those in England and Wales. The law of Scotland has a history and roots, which are distinct from that of England and Wales. Despite forming a union with England and Wales at various points throughout that history, Scotland has retained a separate legal system.

Like the law
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4.2 'Biological control'

We are also guilty of importing exotic species, some of which, like the rhododendron (imported from Asia to Europe), have run riot in the absence of natural predators or primary consumers, and so have tended to out-compete native plants. Sometimes introductions have been accidental; rats and many disease-causing organisms have spread around the world via relatively modern transportation such as sailing ships. However, deliberate introductions, such as the rhododendron, have been made with wor
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1.2.3 Basic principles

Whatever resource you choose to use to find information on the internet, many of the same principles apply. Each source that you use will probably look quite different from the one you tried before, but you'll notice that there are always features that are similar – a box to type your search terms in, for instance, or a clickable help button. Different resources refer to the same functions using different terminology, but the principles behind them are exactly the same. The trick is to chec
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3.3 Green governance needs citizens

The term ‘good governance’ implies that ‘ordinary people’ will be involved in deciding what to do, trying to make it happen, and deciding whether it has happened (debate, implementation, monitoring). But what, in practical terms, might citizen involvement in the governance of an issue such as climate change mean? Citizen involvement in decisions and actions can mean anything from filling in a questionnaire to joining a demonstration to sitting on a committee. One helpful approach is A
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Introduction

This unit is designed to introduce you to the concepts of health and safety within a science laboratory or in the field. There are a number of legal requirements that must be adhered to before carrying out work in a laboratory. One of these is the necessity to carry out risk assessments on the chemical and biological agents that are to be used as part of your practical work activities. As part of this process you may be required to think about minimising exposure of yourself and colleagues to
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Faculty of Law: F.W. Guest Memorial Lecture 2008 – ‘Grave Injustice’, ‘despotic privilege’
Professor J Stuart Anderson, Faculty of Law, Otago, delivers the 2008 F.W. Guest Memorial Lecture – ‘Grave Injustice,’ ‘despotic privilege’: the insecure foundations of crown liability for torts in New Zealand. 6 August 2008
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4.3 Iron storage

In humans, iron is stored mainly in the bone marrow, spleen and liver. About 10 per cent of all the iron in the body is in storage. Two proteins are involved in iron storage; these are called ferritin and haemosiderin (they also occur in other organisms). We shall only study the better characterised (and simpler!) ferritin.

Each ferritin molecule can store iron up to about 20 per cent of its total mass. This is a very high percentage, considering that less than 0.2 per cen
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Indigenous Peoples' Legal Water Forum 2009 Session 4
A forum to explore the rights of Indigenous peoples to be involved in the governance of freshwater. Tom Bennion, barrister sole, editor of Maori Law Review, and specialist in environmental law and Treaty of Waitangi claims, "Maori rights to water: an historical overview".
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4.2 Carbon reduction targets

Let's now look at carbon footprint reduction targets in a bit more detail.

The first international agreement to set carbon reduction targets was the 1997 United Nations Kyoto Protocol, which requires developed countries to reduce their human-generated greenhouse gas emissions by an average of just over 5% on 1990 levels by 2008 to 2012. By the time the treaty came into force in 2005, only the USA and Australia had refused to sign. (A new Australian government finally signe
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