Online market research
How has the arrival of the internet changed the nature of marketing research? Can doing market research with online participants be as effective as with real people? Every company knows good market research is a key factor in getting an advantage over their competitors, knowing specific information about target demographics can be essential for a company’s success. In recent years the internet has revolutionised the way in which modern companies collect and gather data but can these contempora
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Project debriefing

Individual interviews with key members of the project team, for example the managers of key stages, can encourage them to evaluate their performance and identify what they have learned. A structured debriefing process can be helpful, to include stakeholders as well as all the project team. This may take the form of a series of meetings, which draw conclusions about overall project performance and constraints, identify and review any new ways of working that were developed, and consider what c
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Care relationships
To set up a care relationship that works well is a delicate matter, whether you are at the giving or the receiving end. In this free course, Care relationships, you will explore the very varied meanings of care relationships and how these meanings arise. Millions of care relationships are going on as you read this, and each carries its own particular meanings for those involved. But where have all those people picked up their ideas of how to relate to each other? How does any of us know where to
Author(s): Creator not set

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3.1 ‘Making ends meet’

When you say that someone is ‘poor’, what do you mean?

Do people whom others call ‘poor’ always see themselves in that way?

One group whose identities are greatly constrained by income are the poor. But, as the questions above suggest, poverty is not a simple fact of some lives: rather, it is a concept with different meanings, and a label that we may accept or reject. This section c
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Introduction

This course looks at identity, focusing upon the individual's perception of self in relation to others; the relationships between multi-ethnicity, cultural diversity and identity; and the effects of inequality and social class upon identity. It also looks at inequality and social class as they relate to perceived identity.

This OpenLearn course provides a sample of Level 1 study in Author(s): The Open University

Exploring communications technology
This free course, Exploring communications technology, looks at some of the principles underpinning communications technology. It looks at the properties of signals and media (such as optical fibre and radio waves), error control, data compression, and the principles of 4G mobile communications, wi-fi and DSL broadband. First published on Mon, 11 Mar 2019 a
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Simple coding
Have you ever wanted to try out simple coding? Want to understand the basics of what it entails? This course introduces you to the skills, concepts and jargon of coding.  Dr Michel Wermelinger.
First published on Wed, 05 Dec 2018 as Simple coding. To find out more visi

Author(s): Dr Michel Wermelinger

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Internet of everything
The internet of everything (IoE) is the networked connection of people, process, data and things. As more people, data and things come online, we develop processes to harness the vast amounts of information being generated by all these connected people and things. The goal of this free course is to introduce you to fundamental concepts and technologies that enable the IoE and the internet of things. Author(s): Creator not set

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7.3 Subtracting 2's complement integers

You will probably have carried out subtraction of denary numbers using rules for subtraction that include the process of ‘borrowing’ whenever you need to subtract a larger digit from a smaller one. It is possible to perform binary subtraction in a very similar way, but that is not what happens in computers. The processor contains the circuits needed to perform addition, and it is much more efficient to use these circuits also to perform subtraction than it is to build in extra circuits to
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6.2.3 E-procurement

‘Procurement’ is the term used to describe the tendering of goods and services: a company decides that it requires some goods, say a fleet of cars for its salesforce. It would then announce this publicly and invite a number of auto companies to bid for the business.

Many companies are now switching to the web for the procurement process. A website devoted to procurement will normally advertise current procurement opportunities, provide forms facilities for companies interested in te
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Introduction

This course introduces you to analysing academic writing and, in particular, the way an article might be structured to clearly explain an investigation to other researchers. It explores the issue of observation of children and young people across the age range birth to 18 years using qualitative observation approaches in small-scale studies.

This OpenLearn course provides a sample of level 3 study in Author(s): The Open University

4.4.1 Engaging with the content

For example, when I read in paragraph 3 of Layard's article that ‘41 per cent of people in the top quarter of incomes are ‘very happy’’ I asked myself:

  • Why is ‘very happy’ in quotation marks?

  • Is 41 per cent about what I'd expect?

  • What is this telling me?

As soon as I thought about it, I realised that ‘very happy’ could be a response that people had ticked on a questionnaire. Perhaps th
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2.2 The ‘academic’ style

You might also be put off by the ‘academic’ style of writing. In everyday life, what you read is usually written to grab your attention and get a message across quickly before you ‘switch channels’. By contrast, academic texts often raise broad, abstract questions and are unconcerned about arriving at quick answers. For example, where a newspaper headline might say:

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2.1.3 Concept cards

Another way to tackle unfamiliar words is to start a ‘concept card’ system, using index cards. When you meet a word which seems important, take a new card and write the word at the top, followed by any useful information you have found. File the cards alphabetically and add details as you come across new information. (It is worth getting an index card box anyway, then you can try out various ways of using it to organise your studies.)


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1 The experience of reading

The best way to develop your understanding of the reading process is to follow the principles of the Kolb learning cycle, by doing some reading and then reflecting on your experience. To this end, Activity 1 asks you to read an extract from an article by Richard Layard (2003) titled ‘The secrets of happiness’ which appeared in the New Statesman. To keep the task manageable I have reduced the article to half its original length and, for ease of reference, paragraph num
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1.2.1 Boundaries and terminology

In another context Shakespeare asked, ‘What's in a name?’, and suggested by way of an answer that a rose may smell as sweet whatever it is called. In the context of social boundaries, however, the language used is actually very important in determining ‘who's in’ and ‘who's out’.

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2.10 The failure of CAM therapeutic relationships: sexual abuse and exploitation

Another issue that can cause a therapeutic relationship to break down is the failure to maintain appropriate personal or professional boundaries, to the extent that it constitutes serious abuse. A broad spectrum of activities can be called abuse. The term ‘abuse’ originates from the Latin meaning ‘a departure from the purpose (use)’ (Rutter, 1990, p. 41). Given this meaning, clearly some of the boundary issues mentioned above are on the fringes of the category of abuse within CAM. Muc
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References

Abram, J. (2001) The Contribution of the Product Definition Process to a Successful High Volume Software Application, unpublished MSc dissertation, Milton Keynes, The Open University, p. 48.
Andriole, S.J. and Freeman, P.A. (1993) ‘Software systems engineering: the case for a new discipline’, Software Engineering Journal, vol. 8, no. 3, pp. 165–79. Reprinted in Dorfman and Thayer (1997), pp. 29–4
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Keep on learning

Study another free course

There are more than 800 courses on OpenLearn for you to
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