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Learning outcomes

The learning outcomes for this unit are:

  • Critically appreciate the significance of claims made for ‘global corporate citizenship’.

  • Understand the nature of work and ‘social citizenship’.

  • Recognize the difference between ‘acts citizenship’ and ‘status citizenship’.

  • Be able to assess the ‘ethical dimension’ to arguments about citizenship.

  • See the relevance of historical comparisons for understanding co
    Author(s): The Open University

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Introduction

The issue of ‘citizenship, work and the economy’ is often neglected in everyday discussions of citizenship. But a moment's reflection should demonstrate how important it is. The vast majority of us will spend the bulk of our adult lives working in some context or another, and our engagement with economic activity more generally is obvious (and not just as consumers).

Many young people are also intimately tied up with work. School children often have part-time evening, weekend or ho
Author(s): The Open University

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5.2 Further reading

For further reading on the topic of citizenship and democracy, please click on the following ‘view document’ links.

Click on 'view document' below to read New Answers to Old (and New) Criticisms

5.1 A story of fox hunting

Democracy is a thing, a practice. It is also a word – a powerful one, politically, because we all think it is a good thing. When people take part in politics, they try to claim that ‘democracy’ is on their side, and not on that of their opponents.

In November 2004, pro-hunting protesters breached House of Commons security and broke into the chamber to disrupt the debate on banning fox hunting. As a significant minority group, passionately committed to the cause of continuing hunti
Author(s): The Open University

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1 Is democracy really such a good thing?

Politics is vital to all of our lives. The way our schools and businesses are run, how we travel and make a living, even how we see ourselves – it all depends on political decisions. And we are all democrats today. We have elections, parties compete, we vote, and the winners govern us. But how often do we ask: is democracy really a good thing? Is there another way?

We take it for granted that democracy is a good thing and the best political system. But many people complain that democr
Author(s): The Open University

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Learning outcomes

The learning outcomes for this unit are:

  • To consider the value of democracy, through examples.

  • To try to challenge perceived wisdom about our political systems.


Author(s): The Open University

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1.3.12 Internet resources

There are many websites where you will find useful information for education. With all information on the internet you need to make a judgement on the reliability of the information.

UCAS (Universities and Colleges Admissions Service for the UK) Site contents include course information
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1.3.7 Encyclopedias

Encyclopedias can be useful reference texts to use to start your research. There are some available online, such as:

Wikipedia A freely available collaborative encyclopedia.
Encyclopedia Br
Author(s): The Open University

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1.2.1 Planning your search

Your approach to searching will depend to a great extent on what kind of person you are. In an ideal world, when searching for information for a specific purpose, we would all find what exactly we were looking for at the first attempt, especially if we are in a hurry. However, it’s always a good idea to have some kind of plan when you are searching for information, if only to help you plan your time and make sure you find the information you need. If I was starting to search for material on
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MAS.965 NextLab I: Designing Mobile Technologies for the Next Billion Users (MIT)
Can you make a cellphone change the world? NextLab is a hands-on year-long design course in which students research, develop and deploy mobile technologies for the next billion mobile users in developing countries. Guided by real-world needs as observed by local partners, students work in multidisciplinary teams on term-long projects, closely collaborating with NGOs and communities at the local level, field practitioners, and experts in relevant fields. Students are expected to leverage technica
Author(s): Rotberg, Jhonatan,Sarmenta, Luis,Clifford, Gari,Fl

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Learning outcomes

The learning outcomes for this unit are:

  • exploring the links between lesson format and learning styles;

  • examining quality lesson delivery and its links to good behaviour;

  • experimenting with new and innovative approaches to planning and teaching.


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2.3 ‘English’ as a school subject

In official UK curricula, language appears as a curriculum subject under a range of labels. In all four UK countries – England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales – the curricula for the 3–5 years age range (ACCAC, 2000a; DENI, 1997; QCA/DfEE, 2000; SCCC, 1999) include the word ‘language’ in the subject title. In the formal school curriculum, the subject is known as ‘English’ or ‘English Language’ (ACCAC, 2000b; CCEA, 2004; DfEE/QCA, 1999a; SOED, 1991). Wales, Northern Ire
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2.1 Language in everyday life

Language is an ever-present feature of human life. In the developed world in particular, we are surrounded by language. Radio and television provide a soundtrack to the lives of many people. Written language is part of everything from cereal packets and street signs, to relatively new technologies such as email and text messaging. If you were completely alone, far away from any other people or any kind of human contact, how long would it be before words came into your head, perhaps because of
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1.3 Language, mathematics and science in the unit

Because of the schooled culture we have grown up in, we are likely to recognise language, mathematics and science as distinct ‘ways of knowing’. The words ‘language’, ‘mathematics’ and ‘science’ probably prompted you to think first of the school curriculum, where they are often treated very separately from each other. One of the intentions of the unit is to explore and develop your understandings of these three subjects, which means that, inevitably, we will spend some time de
Author(s): The Open University

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Learning outcomes

After studying this unit you will have:

  • explored your knowledge, attitudes and feelings in each subject area;

  • begun to identify, in each subject, areas of knowledge where you are confident and others where you need to deepen your understanding;

  • extended your knowledge and understanding of the place that language, mathematics and science have in the everyday life of individuals and societies.


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2.1 Thinking about values and beliefs underpinning teamwork

While few would contest the value of teamwork, it is important to explore how perceptions of teamwork are reflected in the actual experience of belonging to a team. In Activity 1 you identified the members of your team and you thought about your working relationships. The nature of those relationships large
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1.6 Teaching assistants in Europe

Teaching assistants and other related learning support staff are also to be found in the schools for children of British armed forces posted overseas, in the schools of other European countries and, indeed, further afield in countries such as the USA, Canada and Australia. A survey conducted by the National Union of Teachers (NUT, 1998) highlighted some interesting support roles found in European schools, and it is worthwhile to consider these in the light of the developing role of teaching a
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Vacances d'été
This unit has been designed to develop your French speaking and reading skills by exploring summer holidays in French. First published on Wed, 23 Jul 2014 as Vacances d'été. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn web
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Lebenszyklen
The thematic focus of this unit is people in Germany, Austria and Switzerland and the world they live in. You use audio and text to practise German language skills while also enhancing your cultural understanding. First published on Wed, 16 May 2012 as Lebenszyklen. To find out more visit The Open
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