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Learning outcomes

By the end of this unit you should be able to:

  • explore ideas about place and identity using our concept of ‘geographical imagination’ by examining the images that represent a place to reveal how those images came about;

  • explore ideas about place and identity by examining the images that represent a place to reveal two sets of relationships that are important in understanding the character of a place: power relations and local-global relations.


Author(s): The Open University

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Introduction

This free course includes reading and writing activities that are geared to developing the use of memory, observation and the senses. The aim is to develop your perceptual abilities, honing your capacity to see detail in the world. You will be encouraged to start seeing the familiar in a new way and to make good use of your own personal history.

This OpenLearn course is an adapted extract from the Open University course Author(s): The Open University

2.10 The distribution of repeated measurements

As noted in the previous section, if the same quantity is measured repeatedly, the results will generally be scattered across a range of values. This is perhaps best illustrated using a real example. Table 2 shows 10 measurements of a quantity called the 'unit cell constant' for an industrial catalyst used in the refining of petrol; this is an important quantity which determines how well the catalyst works, and can be measured by X-ray diffraction techniques. Notice that the cell constant is
Author(s): The Open University

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4.8 Activity task

1. Read through the four scenarios below and choose one to answer the associated questions.

Work out your answers to the questions posed.

You will find your list of challenging activities and solutions useful here. In a real situation,
Author(s): The Open University

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3.4.3 Respecting autonomy is the foremost ethical principle in health care

Some commentators believe the pendulum has swung so far in favour of respecting autonomy that it leaves little scope for users to be passive recipients of healing. The desire to make each user an active participant in their own healing process can make it hard, or even impossible, for a user to refuse to engage in active decision making, and leave the decision to the benevolent practitioner. In this case, the user may waive his or her rights, by choosing not to be kept informed about changes
Author(s): The Open University

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9.71 Functional MRI of High-Level Vision (MIT)
We are now at an unprecedented point in the field of neuroscience: We can watch the human brain in action as it sees, thinks, decides, reads, and remembers. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is the only method that enables us to monitor local neural activity in the normal human brain in a noninvasive fashion and with good spatial resolution. A large number of far-reaching and fundamental questions about the human mind and brain can now be answered using straightforward applications of
Author(s): Kanwisher, Nancy

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Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative C

An Aztec Sacrife
When an Aztec priest removed a person's heart during humar sacrifice, would it still be beating? Medical Investigator Shiya Ribowsky has the answer. Video is somewhat graphic and not meant for younger children. Run time 02:59.
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3 Problems with quantification

One of the main problems with the medicalisation of death and dying is the idea that science has all the answers. Illness and dying carry the same degree of unpredictability and uncertainty as all everyday life events. So when service providers draw on medical knowledge and experience to offer some certainty and in one way to quantify the dying experience, it can be difficult to challenge. Indeed, there is a tension between wanting certainty and hoping for things to be different. Campaigner a
Author(s): The Open University

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2.2.12 Activity: living through change

Living through changes

  • 1908 – Royal Commission on the Care and Control of the Feeble-Minded

  • 1910 – James Lappin born

  • 1913 – Mental Deficiency Act (England and Scotland)

  • 1915 – Colin Sproul born


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Lecture 32 - 11/17/2010
Lecture 32
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Cultures
In this free course, Cultures, you will address the question of traditional music and music from the francophone world, and you will examine the place they occupy in the world of artistic creation. The course is divided into three sections: 'Is traditional music, current music?', 'The musical heritage of Normandy' and 'Music of the francophone world'. First published on Thu, 14 Dec 2017 as
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Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2

1 The Adur Carers Project

How the Blockchain and Gold Can Work Together

A look into monetary history shows that people, when given freedom of choice, opted for precious metals as money. This doesn’t come as a surprise. Precious metals have the physical properties a medium must have to serve as legal tender: They are scarce, homogenous, durable, divisible, mintable, and transportable. They are held in high esteem and represent considerable value per unit of weight. Gold fulfills these requirements par excellence, and this is why it has always been peoples&rs
Author(s): Thorsten Polleit

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Odd And Even Numbers – Learn Numbers – Learning Upgrade
From the Math Upgrade 2 courses. (02:09)
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Keep on learning

Study another free course

There are more than 800 courses on OpenLearn for you to choose from on a range of subjects. 

Find out more
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Introduction

This unit will help you to identify and use information in education, whether for your work, study or personal purposes. Experiment with some of the key resources in this subject area, and learn about the skills which will enable you to plan searches for information, so you can find what you are looking for more easily. Discover the meaning of information quality, and learn how to evaluate the information you come across. You will also be introduced to the many different ways of organising yo
Author(s): The Open University

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NFL Live Streaming

Video link (see supported sites below). Please use the original link, not the shortcut, e.g. www.youtube.com/watch?v=abcde

Author(s): andr3a809

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4.8 Interlude – diagrams

Some types of visual information can be represented more economically than in a bitmap. Consider the rather pointless little diagram shown in Figure 21.


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5 Further resources

For an overview of demographic change, Michael Anderson's chapter in the Cambridge Social History of Britain (1983) provides a nuanced overview of what historical demography can offer. John Gillis' A World of Their Own Making (1996) is a fascinating account of the changes in family rituals and meanings in Western societies since the medieval period. Lesley Hall's Sex, Gender and Social Change in Britain since 1880 (2000) provides a good introduction to histories of sexual
Author(s): The Open University

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1 Technological advancement

Everything that can be invented has been invented.

(The Commissioner of the United States Office of Patents, 1899, recommending that his office be abolished, quoted in The Economist, 2000, p. 5)

There is nothing now to be foreseen which can prevent the United States from enjoying an era of business prosperity which is entirely
Author(s): The Open University

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