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1.2.1 The role of the Eurobarometer

In 1973 the Directorate of Information of the European Commission instituted a survey of public opinion amongst the members of the EEC. So now, twice a year, a sample of about 1,000 people from each country are interviewed on topics related to European integration and EU policy and institutions. This survey of public opinion is usually referred to as Eurobarometer. The reports are initially published by the Commission in French and English, though they are subsequently made available i
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4.1 Introduction

The 1970s marked a period in which the cessation of the ‘normal’ period of full-time employment at 60 or 65 years had become the accepted orthodoxy. The personal lives of older people had thus become constituted outside the domain of paid employment and within the arena of public and private welfare. As we illustrated in the preceding section, pensions, organised around fixed ages of retirement based on chronological measurements of age, played a crucial role in this process. Further, as
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"Environmental Degradation and Deforestation in Thailand and Cambodia"
Alan Kolata is Neukom Family Distinguished Service Professor of Anthropology, The University of Chicago. There is little doubt that climate change, deforestation, erosion, and the unequal distribution of natural resources around the globe are of pressing importance everywhere, but these problems are perhaps most acute in Asia, home to 64 percent of the world’s population. Much of this population (1 and 1.3 billion, respectively) is concentrated in India and China, two countries with rapidly g
Author(s): The Center for International Studies at the Univer

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Introduction

Even the simplest organisms can detect and respond to events in their ever-changing environment. Similarly, within a multicellular organism, cells are surrounded by an extracellular environment from which signals are received and responded to. Extracellular events are decoded and transmitted to relevant parts of individual cells by way of a series of activation/deactivation steps involving many intracellular molecules. This relay of information along molecular pathways is called signal tra
Author(s): The Open University

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Online passport status

Video link (see supported sites below). Please use the original link, not the shortcut, e.g. www.youtube.com/watch?v=abcde

Author(s): Anny7

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Activity 7: Hofstede's way of thinking about national culture

Allow 60 minutes for this activity.

Activity 6 introduced you to Hofstede's academic writing. This activity takes this further by giving you the chance to take a closer look at what he actually said.

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1.4.3 Structures that both enable and constrain

Life within a society is made possible by structures. They operate at many levels, from the details of daily life (e.g. the routines of getting up in the morning, or the ritual greetings we use when we meet people) to the broader organisation of society (e.g. the channels through which mass media ‘news’ is generated, or the rules under which benefit payments are made). Even the language through which I am communicating now is a structured system of written symbols. But structures not only
Author(s): The Open University

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Let's Discover French 3: Bonne Fête, Canada!
This animation, from the Let's Discover French Level 3 course, is aimed at grades 6 and 7. This animation is about Canada Day! Could also be used as a refresher for more advanced French language learners. Video is entirely in French.


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Graphic novels : Lesfiches voor stimulatie leesplezier
graphic_novels.jpg

In dit naslagwerk vind je zeventien lesfiches die het leesplezier bij de jongeren kunnen stimuleren door gebruik te maken van graphic novels.

De fiches bevatten naast informatie over de graphic novel zelf mogelijke lesideeën voor verschillende …


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6.046J Introduction to Algorithms (SMA 5503) (MIT)
This course teaches techniques for the design and analysis of efficient algorithms, emphasizing methods useful in practice. Topics covered include: sorting; search trees, heaps, and hashing; divide-and-conquer; dynamic programming; amortized analysis; graph algorithms; shortest paths; network flow; computational geometry; number-theoretic algorithms; polynomial and matrix calculations; caching; and parallel computing.This course was also taught as part of the Singapore-MIT Alliance (SMA) program
Author(s): Leiserson, Charles,Demaine, Erik

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Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative C

References

Foley, P. (2008) ‘Introduction’ in Collins, J. and Foley, P. (eds) Promoting Children's Wellbeing: Policy and Practice, Bristol, The Policy Press in association with The Open University.
Maynard, T. (2007) ‘Encounters with Forest School and Foucault: A Risky Business?’ Education 3–13, vol. 35, no. 4, pp. 379–391.

Author(s): The Open University

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Virtual Maths - 2D Shapes, triangle
Interactive simulation demonstrating calculation of area of a triangle
Author(s): Leeds Metropolitan University

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http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

8.2 Summary

Enid and Sarah mentioned relatives and friends, but the others sounded as if they were managing on their own, or within their immediate family unit. Care work can be an isolating experience. The hours are long. Sometimes they are unpredictable, and being cared for doesn't always mean that you're necessarily going to be able to have the time or energy to develop other relationships. You might like to consider whether demographic changes are likely to have an effect on who is available for care
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MITEI Seminar w/David Konisky - Cheap and Clean: How Americans Think about Energy in the Age of Glob
David Konisky
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2.4 The body's different components

Looking at the body this way means thinking about things as small as atoms and molecules, and as large as whole body parts. This allows us to think about how everything works at an appropriate level. If we want to understand breathing, for example, we need to think about tiny things such as the oxygen molecules that are absorbed in the body. Similarly, if we want to understand eating, we have to think of complicated internal structures such as the stomach. If we want to understand how the bod
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Acknowledgements

The content acknowledged below is Proprietary (see terms and conditions) and is used under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence.

Grateful acknowledgement is made to the following sources:

Text:
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References

Alley, R. B. (2000) The Two Mile Time Machine, Princeton, Princeton University Press.
Arnakak, J. (2000) ‘What is Inuit Qaujimajatuqangit?’, Nu
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1.1 Line graphs

A line graph is a method of showing a relationship between two variables, such as the output of an organisation and the associated costs. There are some special terms that you need to understand in order to create and interpret line graphs. These terms include: the axes, the origin, the intercept and the slope (or gradient).

Author(s): The Open University

2.3 Activity 1: Flora Macdonald

temp – ground stewardess – office manager – accountant

Figure 1.4
© Owen Logan ©
© Owen Logan
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4.1 Introduction

You cannot cite precedents to a judge and ask him or her to follow them if you don't have a good record of all the earlier cases and how they were decided. The operation of binding precedent, therefore, relies on the existence of an extensive reporting service to provide access to previous judicial decisions.

This section will briefly set out where you might locate case reports on particular areas of the law. This is of particular importance to advocates (usually barristers but s
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