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6 What you should present

This assessment unit has two parts. Part A requires you to plan, monitor, evaluate and reflect upon your skills, and present evidence of that process. Part B requires you to select concise examples of your work that demonstrate what you have done to improve and apply your skills. Together the two parts form a showcase portfolio of evidence and reflective commentary on your skills achievements. You can use the guidance, Bookmarks and Skills Sheets included in the OpenLearn unit U529_1 Key s
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8.4 Assessing your work

Table 1 below gives the outcomes (italic) and criteria for assessment of your work. Alongside the criteria is a checklist to help you consider and assess your work.

Table 1: Criteria for asses
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7.3 Monitoring progress

Present a reflective commentary that makes reference to your ongoing notes and records and includes:

  • What you did to manage your time as you worked on your course or work activities, and your own assessment of the effectiveness of your time management. For example, the use you made of your planning schedules, any changes you made to your deadlines, what you did about unexpected priorities and whether you feel your time management is effective.


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1.1.7 Using the memory buttons

Calculations involving several operations can also be carried out in stages. One way to do this is to use the ‘=’ key part way through the calculation. You can also use the calculator's memory.

The Windows calculator has a number of memory buttons, shown in Figure 2, to hel
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1.1.4 Simple arithmetic operations

To perform a simple arithmetic calculation:

  1. Enter the first number in the calculation (for example ‘123’) using one of the following methods:

     

    • Using your computer keyboard's numeric keypad, which (if you have one) is on the right of your computer keyboard. Check to see whether the Num Lock indicator light is on and if it is not press the NUM LOCK key.

    • Using your computer keyboard'
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1.1.3 Keeping the calculator running on your Windows desktop

When performing a number of calculations whilst using other programs on your computer, it's convenient to keep the calculator running in the background.

To do this click on the ‘Minimise’ button of the calculator's window (the leftmost button in the top right corner). When you are ready to start working with the calculator again, click the ‘Calculator’ button in the Windows taskbar. (The taskbar is usually at the bottom of the screen; it contains the ‘Start’ button.)


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Introduction

Your course might not include any maths or technical content but, at some point during your course, it’s likely that you’ll come across information represented in charts, graphs and tables. You’ll be expected to know how to interpret this information, and possibly encouraged to present your own findings in this way. This unit will help you to develop the skills you need to do this, and gain the confidence to use them.

This unit can be used in conjunction with, and builds on the Op
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Introduction

Information technology is an integral part of courses. It's used to enable students to learn about their subject, contact one another, and find resources.

Using a computer for study can be useful for students on any course. For example, about a half of all Open University courses expect students to use a computer.

In this unit, you'll look at:

  • the different ways you might be asked to use a PC in your course;

  • top tips to ge
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3.2 Answering the question

An essay can be good in almost every other way and yet be judged poor because it ignores the question in the title. Strictly speaking, I should say ‘it ignores the issues presented in the title’ because not every essay title actually contains a question. But, in fact, there is usually a central question underlying an essay title, even when it takes the form of a quotation from a text followed by the instruction ‘Discuss’. And you need to work out what that underlying question is, beca
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2.5.1 Sentences

We can see that Philip knows what a sentence is because he writes some perfectly good ones. For example:

In many ways going into urban life from the countryside was beneficial to woman of the upperclass.

This sentence begins with a capital letter and ends with a full stop. It has a subject (urban life) and a main verb (was). As any sentence is, it is a self-contained ‘unit of meaning’. It m
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5 Further reading

Claridge, G. (1985) Origins of Mental Illness: Temperament, Deviance and Disorder, Oxford, Blackwell.

A classic text on ‘abnormal’ psychology.

Faludy, T. and Faludy, A. (1996) A Little Edge of Darkness: A Boy's Triumph Over Dyslexia, London, Jessica Kingsley.

This is the personal account written by Alexander Faludy and his mother, Tanya, of their experiences of understanding and managing Alexander's dyslexia.

Miles, T.R. and Miles, E. (1999) Dyslex
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3.3.1 Multisensory teaching for students

Guyer et al. (1993) tested the effectiveness of the Wilson Reading System for improving spelling in higher education students with dyslexia. They compared this technique to a non-phonic approach that teaches visual memory techniques to help students to remember frequently misspelled words. A control group of students with dyslexia but who had specifically requested no intervention formed the control group. Both intervention groups were tutored in the given technique for two, one-hour sessions
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3.1.1 Treatment or management?

In the preceding paragraph you will notice that we talked generally about the treatment of conditions, but referred to ‘managing’ dyslexia. Why did we do this? It relates to the following important general issues:

Is treatment (i.e. intervention) warranted? We mentioned this issue when we were discussing sociocultural or personal distress based definitions of abnormality. Intervention is not always desi
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3.1 Thinking about intervention

So far we have looked at issues relating to how we define ‘abnormal’ behaviour, and how we think about explanations. Now we will consider the more practical issue of how to approach the treatment of such difficulties. As in the previous section, we will discuss behavioural, cognitive and biological perspectives on treatment and consider specific techniques from each perspective that are applicable to the management of dyslexia.


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2.4.2 Differences in sensory, perceptual and motor function

As we saw in our discussion of cognitive explanations, there has been longstanding debate over the possible contribution of perceptual problems to dyslexia. Subjectively, many children and adults with dyslexic difficulties do report ‘visual symptoms’ when trying to read. These include letters and words appearing to move or ‘blur’ on the page, particular difficulties with small, crowded print, and complaints of ‘glare’ or other kinds of visual discomfort (see Figure 5).


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2.2.1 The phonological processing deficit

Recall Alexander Faludy's difficulties in learning to read and write, and the other behavioural characteristics associated with having dyslexia. You might have noticed that many features of dyslexia point to a difficulty with some aspects of memory. That is, people with dyslexia have difficulty with tasks that require short-term memory processing such as mental arithmetic, writing and learning new information. However, these tasks have an additional feature in common: they contain a phonologi
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1.8 Reflecting on definitions of ‘abnormality’

The main thing to remember is that the way that ‘abnormality’ is defined will have consequences for the method of identification. It will also impact on people's expectations of their future development. For example, we discussed the way that dyslexia is defined in relation to a person's IQ. Does that mean that if someone has a low IQ and an even lower reading age we should adjust our expectations of what that person can achieve with help, or let IQ influence how much help is offered? Sim
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Introduction

Target setting for pupil attainment is seen as being a means of raising standards in schools through placing pupil achievement at the core of school planning. This unit will help governors of secondary schools ensure that realistic yet challenging targets are set and provide guidance on assessing the data that needs to be evaluated to come to such decisions.


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Acknowledgements

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Author

Sue Platt has been a school governor for 21 years, at both primary and secondary p
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5.2.1 Technical and usable accessibility

An online resource needs to be usable for disabled users as well as accessible. Lawton Henry (2002) makes the distinction between ‘technical accessibility’ and ‘usable accessibility’. We will illustrate this distinction with two examples.

  1. In a web-based example, a blind user listening to a screen reader may technically be able to access the data presented in a table, i.e. the screen reader may be able to read the content of each cell in
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