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1.6.4 Blogs

The founder ofTechnorati  claims that the number of ‘blogs’ doubles every five months and that the creation rate is approaching two per second. One estimate I read in July 2010 put the number at 400 million ‘blogs’. Because these online diaries offer instant publishing opportunities, you potentially have access to a wealth of knowledge from commentators and experts (if they blog) in a wi
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1.3.4 Databases

At a basic level, a database is a collection of information which can be searched. It is a way of storing, indexing, organising and retrieving information. You may have created one yourself to keep track of your references – or your friends' names and addresses. They are useful for finding articles on a topic, and can be used to search for many different types of information.

You may find some of the following databases useful for your topic. They contain different types of informatio
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2.12 Faites le bilan: Sessions 6 – 10

Now that you have finished the last five sessions of this unit, you should be able to:


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2.11.1 Revision: choosing and booking hotels

In this session, you will revise choosing and booking hotel rooms, understanding directions, identifying and using dates (years).

Activité 56

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2.1.1 Activité 8

1. In Extract 43 you heard some of the language you will need to book a hotel room. Match the French with the English.

Trouvez les équivalents.


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1.1.3 Activités 2 et 3

Activité 2

Listen to Extract 40 in which you ask Christine where three places are. Speak after each prompt. The first one has been done as an example.

Écoutez l'extrait 40 et parlez dans les pauses.


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Managing to meet service users' needs
Frontline managers are responsible for gathering service user views on their needs. Whose views should be taken into account? How do managers gather views? This unit helps you consider ways of getting feedback from service users, and shows the inclusive approach of a manager of a voluntary sector mental health service. First published on Thu, 14 Jul 2011 as Author(s): Creator not set

Children living in different settings
Most children live with a parent or parents, with siblings and relatives and with family pets in the family home, but many children do not live with their parents or even with their families. They may live elsewhere through choice or necessity, but whatever the event that causes them to move away from their parents or families, the significance of moving in a child’s life can be considerable. This material will be of interest to anyone who supports children who live away from their families in
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Sport media and culture: Who\'s calling the shots?
The media play a huge part in sport; we find out what's happening, how our team is doing and it creates great sporting moments and sports celebrities and stars. This unit looks at the role played by the media in sport and how this has changed with the development of internet and satellite TV. Who calls the shots athletes, teams or the media moguls? How do social scientists explain this relationship between sport and the media?Author(s): Creator not set

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5.2 Technologies of help?

Click view document to read: Technology, Selfhood and Physical Disabilty

View document66.4KB PD
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3.1 ‘Race’, ethnicity and communication

As noted in the Introduction, much of the debate about difference and diversity in health and social care has focused on issues of ‘race’ and ethnicity. It is perhaps the area that first comes to mind when there is discussion about issues of communication and difference in care services, but it is also an area where the arguments are most complex and contentious.

As you saw in Section 1, ‘racial’ or ethnic diversity has often been constructed as a ‘problem’ for health and so
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2.7.5 Identities are negotiated

In constructing their identities, people can only draw on terms that are available in society at that time, which have meanings and associations attached. However, people may attribute different meanings and importance to those labels. This means people always negotiate their identities, in the context of the different meanings attached to them.

Taking this view of identity, as a social process that people engage in, rather than as a fixed essence inside them, is not to deny that partic
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2.6 Reflecting on identity

Activity 3

0 hours 20 minutes

How would you describe your identity or identities? What kind of words would you use to describe yourself in terms of:

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2.2.12 Activity: living through change

Living through changes

  • 1908 – Royal Commission on the Care and Control of the Feeble-Minded

  • 1910 – James Lappin born

  • 1913 – Mental Deficiency Act (England and Scotland)

  • 1915 – Colin Sproul born


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2.2.5 The emergence of asylum professionals

Asylums and institutions were not only sites of care and control, they were also places where people worked as staff and developed professional expertise. The people who worked there also experienced segregation, professionally speaking. In this section we take a brief look at the development of caring professions in the institutions.

Low status patients, frequently paupers, with low status illnesses and conditions, such as mental illness, mental frailty or mental handicap, provided no
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Learning outcomes

After studying this unit you should be able to:

  • use Goffman’s model of ‘the total institution’ to organise and explain information that has been observed and recorded;

  • describe the development of large-scale institutions in the nineteenth century which were designed to segregate, control and in some cases, cure, their inmates.


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Introduction

In this unit we consider some of the issues raised by Howard Mitchell who has made a special study of Lennox Castle Hospital, about ten miles from Glasgow at Lennoxtown. His study is the subject of the video clips that accompany this block. Lennox Castle Hospital belongs to the period of the 1920s and 1930s when separate provision for people with learning difficulties was being developed following the 1913 Mental Deficiency Act.

This material is from our archive and is an adapted extrac
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Introduction

This Unit looks at the work of William Beveridge in reforming the field of social welfare after World War II. Particular attention is paid to the attitude towards women and immigrants to the United Kingdom.

This material is from our archive and is an adapted extract from Understanding Health and Social Care (K100) which is no longer taught by The Open University. If you want to study formally with us, you may wish to explore other courses we offer in this Author(s): The Open University

Acknowledgements

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see terms and conditions), this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence

Grateful acknowledgement is made to the following sources for permission to reproduce material in this Unit:

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A good death?

How would you classify these four deaths? The following comments are from the course testers and authors.

Vic's death was lonely and probably difficult, in that his breathing was laboured as a result of his disease. Seeing his children after five years and being alert enough to recognise them are positive elements in what seemed to be a sad and difficult life.

Li’s death was good in many ways. Her family were with her and prepared, she was not distressed as far as it is possible
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Tell the time
Ask and pay for goods and services
Understand and give directions in a building
Understand what is and is not allowed
Identify and use dates
Use expressions of time