Pages 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196 197 198 199 200 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 226 227 228 229 230 231 232 233 234 235 236 237 238 239 240 241 242 243 244 245 246 247 248 249 250 251 252 253 254 255 256 257 258 259 260 261 262 263 264 265 266 267 268 269 270 271 272 273 274 275 276 277 278 279 280 281 282 283 284 285 286 287 288 289 290 291 292 293 294 295 296 297 298 299 300 301 302 303 304 305 306 307 308 309 310 311 312 313 314 315 316 317 318 319 320 321 322 323 324 325 326 327 328 329 330 331 332 333 334 335 336 337 338 339 340 341 342 343 344 345 346 347 348 349 350 351 352 353 354 355 356 357 358 359 360 361 362 363 364 365 366 367 368 369 370 371 372 373 374 375 376 377 378 379 380 381 382 383 384 385 386 387 388 389 390 391 392 393 394 395 396 397 398 399 400 401 402 403 404 405 406 407 408 409 410 411 412 413 414 415 416 417 418 419 420 421 422 423 424 425 426 427 428 429 430 431 432 8637 result(s) returned

5 Conclusion

Are we now better equipped to answer the three questions posed in Section 1.1?

How are identities formed?

We present ourselves to others through everyday interactions, through the way we speak and dress, marking ourselves as the same as those with whom we share an identity and different from those with whom we do
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The Politics of Memorials [Audio]
Speaker(s): Michelle Codrington-Rogers, Dr Margaret O’Callaghan, Dr Rahul Rau | Memorials have been fiercely debated in recent times. What roles do memorials play in a society and how do these acts of remembering contribute to a communities’ sense of identity? What gets remembered and what forgotten, and who decides? When, if ever, should memorials be removed? The panel will discuss past and present controversies around public memorializing, from Ground Zero to Confederate monuments, from Rh
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Learning outcomes

After studying this course, you should be able to:

  • conduct searches efficiently and effectively

  • find references to material in bibliographic databases

  • make efficient use of full text electronic journals services

  • critically evaluate information from a variety of sources

  • understand the importance of organising information.


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References

Beetham, D. (1999) Democracy and Human Rights, Cambridge, Polity Press.
Brown, C. (2001) ‘Human rights’ in Baylis, J. and Smith, S. (eds) The Globalization of World Politics: An Introduction to International Relations, Oxford, Oxford University Press.
Caney, S.(2001) ‘International distributive justice’ Political Studies, vol. 49, pp. 974–97.
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1.6.1 Working in ambiguous situations

So far the focus has been on discussing scenes played out in the highly structured settings of hospitals and doctors’ surgeries. However, a lot of care takes place in settings where structures are much less clear – where the meaning of a scene can be highly ambiguous, and where any working consensus between participants is fragile.

When a social worker goes into a family home, for example, the members of the household may not agree at all with the social worker’s definition
Author(s): The Open University

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Daily GK Updates Feb 2016

Video link (see supported sites below). Please use the original link, not the shortcut, e.g. www.youtube.com/watch?v=abcde

Author(s): Srinivas

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Rights not set

"Ecology, Human Rights, and Large Dam Projects in South Asia"
Kathleen Morrison is Professor, Department of Anthropology; Director, Center for International Studies, The University of Chicago. There is little doubt that climate change, deforestation, erosion, and the unequal distribution of natural resources around the globe are of pressing importance everywhere, but these problems are perhaps most acute in Asia, home to 64 percent of the world’s population. Much of this population (1 and 1.3 billion, respectively) is concentrated in India and China, tw
Author(s): The Center for International Studies at the Univer

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Rights not set

The Energy Song by Bo
Sing and learn about Work and Mechanical Energy with Bo! This is an AP Physics 1 topic. (03:23)

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7.2 Frameworks

A framework is a set of classes with well-defined interactions which are designed to solve specific problems. Frameworks are usually developed for a specific domain of application, say financial management or document preparation. They go some way towards a complete solution, but require some degree of customisation, usually through the creation of subclasses within the framework or by overriding operations. Coplien suggests:

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Learning outcomes

After studying this course, you should be able to:

  • distinguish between parenthood and parenting

  • outline some of the reasons why parenting may require support from outside the immediate family

  • demonstrate how individual, environmental and structural factors can have an impact on parenting

  • challenge the notion that ‘problem’ parents and ‘problem’ families can be readily identified

  • demonstrate the development of ke
    Author(s): The Open University

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5.1 Domain, specification and design modelling

Building quality software is often a complex and lengthy task. Software developers build models that represent what is important, devoid of unnecessary detail. These models help them to deal with the complexity and to understand what is being developed.

This is not unlike other forms of design. For instance, when an architect develops model of a house as a set of drawings they will probably show where the walls and windows are and their relative sizes, but not any details about t
Author(s): The Open University

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8.1 Actividad

Actividad 8.1

In this activity you are going to find out about two hotels, one in Havana and one in Valencia, what they look like and where they are situated.

1 Look at the pictures of the two hotels. Decide which wo
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4.1 What is a data flow diagram?

A data flow diagram (DFD) is a graphical description of the ebb and flow of data in a given context. A DFD allows you to identify the transformations that take place on data as it moves from input to output in the system. (DFDs pre-date UML diagrams, but still have a complementary role to play in describing systems.)

The Case Study below provides an example of a DFD used to describe the Open University's eTMA system (electronic Tutor Marked Assignment system). It uses the
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7.2.1 E-shop

This is the most ubiquitous form of commerce on the World Wide Web. It involves a company presenting a catalogue of its wares to internet users and providing facilities whereby such customers can purchase these products. Almost invariably such a site will contain facilities for ordering and paying for products by means of credit cards. The sophistication of sites described by this business model range from just the simple presentation of a static catalogue to the presentation of an interactiv
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Lecture 14, February 28
Marketing - MKTG 25010 Lectures - Lecture 14, February 28 - Kent State University > COLLEGES > College of Business Administration > COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION > Marketing > MKTG 25010 Lectures > Lecture 14, February 28
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"The Hot Air Show" Episode 2: October 29
What happened in China at the climate talks leading up to the UNFCCC's Sixteenth Conference of the Parties in Cancun and what does it mean? An update on domestic policies in Congress and the EPA. Preview of the Upcoming Elections and the impact that will have. What is the future of pre-compliance carbon investment in offsets?
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What is the 14th Amendment?
The history of civil rights, and controversial cases in law history and historical events leading to the 14th amendment.
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La Victoire de Samothrace, du chef d’oeuvre à la matière (audio)

La restauration de la Victoire de Samothrace en 2013-2014 a permis de mettre en œuvre une campagne d’analyses et d’examens sans précédent pour mieux en comprendre son état de conservation et la nature des marbres employés ou encore repérer quelques vestiges de polychromie antique invisibles à l’œil nu. Une fois les ...
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2.7 Propagation delay

The time taken for a signal to travel from its source to its destination is known as propagation delay. This is derived from the verb 'propagate' which in a physics context means 'spread' or 'travel'. The propagation delay depends on a number of factors, including the distance the signal has to travel and the signal's speed.

Contemporary physics states that nothing can travel faster than the speed of light (or any electromagnetic wave) in a vacuum which, to the nearest metre, is
Author(s): The Open University

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London Pride AA51_06866

*

Festival of Britain 1951, Lambeth, London. The sculpture 'London Pride' by Frank Dobson at the South Bank Exhibition site. Photographed by M W Parry.
© Historic England


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