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1.2 A Babylonian mathematical problem

Before seeing how our knowledge has been acquired, let us get into the spirit of things by ascertaining what a problem looks like once the modern cuneiform scholar has translated a tablet. The following example is taken from a tablet (see Figure 2), now at Yale University, translated by Otto Neugebauer and Abraham Sachs. Words in square brackets are their suggested reconstructions of what the tablet presumably says (where it is damaged), and words in parentheses are the translator's additions
Author(s): The Open University

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Care of Patients in the Postpartum Period

Content Type: 
Resource

These are reference Open Educational Resources selected for residents in obstetrics and gynecology. This collection was developed in response to a request from the 1000+ OBGYN Consortium for supplemental learning materials based on topics from
Author(s): kludewig

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8 What are the chances that scientific literacy will prevail?

So far, we've looked at some intellectual and pedagogic challenges about delivering a syllabus driven by the demands of scientific literacy. We've acknowledged benefits, but also touched on concerns about over-ambition, perhaps especially with regard to those other areas of knowledge besides science that have to be taken on board. The real and imagined barriers to using school science to promote scientific literacy are the focus of the next reading.

Author(s): The Open University

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Introduction to group theory
This free course is an introduction to group theory, one of the three main branches of pure mathematics. Section 1 looks at the set of symmetries of a two-dimensional figure which are then viewed as functions. Section 2 introduces an algebraic notation for recording symmetries and calculating composites and inverses of symmetries. Section 3 introduces definitions and looks at how to check axioms for a group. Section 4 looks at how to prove that some properties of groups already looked at are gen
Author(s): Creator not set

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3.2 Multiplying and dividing

To multiply and divide by 10, 100, 1000, etc., write the digits in their place value columns. To multiply, move the digits to the left (replacing the numbers on the right with zeros) and to divide move them to the right (putting in a decimal point, and any zeros necessary for the place value).

Multiplication and division by whole numbers in general can be carried out by combining this technique with a knowledge of the multiplication tables up to 10.

Author(s): The Open University

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1 Modelling pollution in the Great Lakes

The main teaching text of this course is provided in the workbook below. The answers to the exercises that you'll find throughout the workbook are given in the answer book. You can access it by clicking on the link under the workbook. When prompted to watch the video for this course, return to this page and watch the clips below. After you've watched the clips, return to the workbook.

Click the link below to open the workbook (PDF, 0.6 MB).

Author(s): The Open University

Try some yourself

Question 1

Find the unknown angles in each of these diagrams, which represent part of the bracing structure supporting a marquee.

Author(s): The Open University

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2.3 Geometric shapes – circles

All circles are the same shape – they can only have different sizes.

In a circle, all the points are the same distance from a point called the centre. The centre is often labelled with the letter O.

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2.1 Geometric shapes – triangles

This section deals with the simplest geometric shapes and their symmetries. All of the shapes are two-dimensional – hence they can be drawn accurately on paper.

Simple geometric shapes are studied in mathematics partly because they are used in thousands of practical applications. For instance, triangles occur in bridges, pylons and, more mundanely, in folding chairs; rectangles occur in windows, cinema screens and sheets of paper; while circles are an essential part of wheels, gears a
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Try some yourself

Question 1

Find α and β in each of the diagrams below.

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1.3.1 Try some yourself

Activity 3

A local supermarket sells a popular breakfast cereal in a ‘Large Pack’ and ‘New Extra Large Pack’. They are both being sold at ‘knock down’ prices. The large pack contains 450 g of cereal priced at
Author(s): The Open University

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1.2.2 Content

School mathematics curricula often focus on lists of content objectives in areas like number, arithmetic, statistics, measurement, geometry, trigonometry, and algebra. A typical list of content objectives might contain over one hundred objectives to be introduced or revisited and learned each year. These can be seen as hierarchical in nature but many textbooks do not attempt to organise the objectives in ways that enable the bigger underpinning ideas to become apparent to the pupils. In addit
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Studying mammals: Return to the water
Some of the most unusual and versatile of all the mammals are the groups that live, feed and reproduce underwater. In this free course, Studying mammals: Return to the water, we will see how these formerly land-based mammals adapted to a return to the water, discussing such challenges as breathing, movement and communication. This is the seventh course in the Studying mammals series. Author(s): Creator not set

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Biofuels
This free course, Biofuels, investigates what is meant by a biofuel and covers the advantages of using biofuels compared with fossil fuels. The different types of biofuel are explored, with particular emphasis on transport biofuels. Finally, the issue of whether biofuels are the complete answer to our future energy needs is considered. First published on Mon, 21 Mar 2016 as
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The environmental impact of teaching and learning
This free course, The environmental impact of teaching and learning, discusses the impact on the environment of carbon based teaching and learning in Higher Education Institutions. It introduces a suite of innovative tools and resources which have been designed to help assess and identify ways to reduce these impacts. First published
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Climate change: transitions to sustainability
Human societies have to take urgent action to end their dependences on fossil fuels. We have to alter the whole path of our development and decision making in order to make our societies both environmentally adaptable and sustainable. This free course, Climate change, takes on the task of trying to chart some of the ways in which it might be possible.Author(s): Creator not set

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Introduction

This unit explores different understandings of nature and environment and the significance these may have for developing responsibility. The problems of connecting human and non-human nature are presented here as being a challenge peculiar to the concerns of environmental responsibility. They provide the impetus for exploring the idea of ‘conversation’ as a metaphor for what matters in environmental responsibility. Using a reading by Stephen Talbott as a foundation, the conversation me
Author(s): The Open University

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Living without oil
Crude oil is currently our most important global source of energy. It is vital in the manufacture of many modern materials. But the worlds supply of oil is finite, its price is unstable and our reliance on oil has damaging environmental consequences. This free course, Living without oil, explains why developing alternatives to oil is an essential and urgent task for humanity. Author(s): Creator not set

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Exploring philosophy: faking nature
Commercial exploitation of nature, such as mining, fracking, or generating hydro-electric power, often damages the way the natural environment looks. What if the environment could be restored to exactly how it looked before? Would that mean that no damage had been done, that the natural environment was as valuable as it had been before the commercial exploitation? This free course, Exploring philosophy: faking nature, examines ‘the restoration thesis’, and provides an insight into philosophi
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The science of nuclear energy
This free course, The science of nuclear energy, will delve into the science behind nuclear power and explain what happens inside a nuclear reactor and what it means for an element to be radioactive. It will explore some of the risks of producing nuclear power and examine the arguments for and against including it in future energy planning as well as looking at other potential future solutions. Author(s): Creator not set

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