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Introduction

Target setting for pupil attainment is seen as being a means of raising standards in schools through placing pupil achievement at the core of school planning. This unit will help governors of secondary schools ensure that realistic yet challenging targets are set and provide guidance on assessing the data that needs to be evaluated to come to such decisions.


Author(s): The Open University

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Acknowledgements

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Author

Sue Platt has been a school governor for 21 years, at both primary and secondary p
Author(s): The Open University

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5.2.1 Technical and usable accessibility

An online resource needs to be usable for disabled users as well as accessible. Lawton Henry (2002) makes the distinction between ‘technical accessibility’ and ‘usable accessibility’. We will illustrate this distinction with two examples.

  1. In a web-based example, a blind user listening to a screen reader may technically be able to access the data presented in a table, i.e. the screen reader may be able to read the content of each cell in
    Author(s): The Open University

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4.8 Activity task

1. Read through the four scenarios below and choose one to answer the associated questions.

Work out your answers to the questions posed.

You will find your list of challenging activities and solutions useful here. In a real situati
Author(s): The Open University

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4.1.1 Disability discrimination legislation

This activity uses the UK Disability Discrimination Act (DDA) Part 4 as the basis for discussing the concept of making reasonable adjustments. The DDA may not apply to you directly, but many countries have similar legislation. We feel the underlying principles of such legislation reflect the moral standpoint or the right thing to do, regardless of whether or not legislation exists.


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3.14 References

BBC (2005) ‘Men's health’, London, British Broadcasting Corporation, http://www.bbc.co.uk/health/mens_health/index.shtml (Accessed 31 July 2007).

British Dyslexia Association (2005) ‘What is dyslexia?’. Reading, British Dyslexia Association, http://www.bdadyslexia.org.uk/extra329.html (Accessed 31 July 2007).

RNIB (2005) ‘About sight loss – changing the way we think about blindness’ [online], London, Royal National Institute of the Blind (Accessed 31 July 2007).


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3.3.3 Screen readers and speech synthesisers

A screen reader monitors the information sent from the computer to the screen. It makes decisions about which part of the screen to read and in what order, then passes this information to either a speech synthesiser or a Braille display. All screen readers support speech synthesisers and most support Braille displays.

The first speech synthesisers were hardware, usually a small box that sat on the desktop and had its own speaker, or a card that fitted inside the computer and used extern
Author(s): The Open University

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2.5 Resources

Barnes, C. (1992) Disabling Imagery and the Media, The British Council of Organisations of Disabled People, Halifax, Ryburn Publishing.


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2.2 Defining disability

So, what do we mean by the term ‘disability’? The Open University doesn't define the term, but offers services to any person with ‘a disability, health problem, mental-health difficulty or specific learning difficulty (such as dyslexia) that affects their ability to study’ (Open to Your Needs booklet, pdf file, 2005).

In the UK the main legislation used to improve the treatment of disabled people and to manage resources is the Disability Discrimination Act (DDA).

T
Author(s): The Open University

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2.1.3 Handicap

A disadvantage for a given individual, resulting from an impairment or disability, that limits or prevents the fulfilment of a role that is normal (depending on age, sex and social and cultural factors) for that individual.

If you are interested in political aspects of disability awareness, the DEMOS ‘Disability Awareness’ module is a good place to start. This topic also studied in two OU courses: K222 Care, Welfare and Community for Social Workers and D218 Social Policy:
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1.5.4 References

CSR Europe (undated) ‘Disability: facts and figures’ [online], Brussels, CSR Europe, www.csreurope.org/csrinfo/csrdisability/DisabilityFactsandfigures/ (Accessed 14 August 2007).

National Disability Team (2000–2005) ‘Statistics – On Course’, Chelmsford, National Disability Team, (Accessed 14 August 2007).


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References

Hughes, M. (1991) Closing the Learning Gap, Network Educational Press Ltd.
Lucas, W. (2001) Power Up Your Mind, Nicholas Brearley Publishing.
Rose, C. (1985) Accelerated Learning, Accelerated Learning Systems Ltd.
UNESCO (1977) Suggestive, accelerative learning and teaching: A manual of classroom procedures base
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1.2 Challenges to child-centredness: the curriculum and assessment 5–14 programme

In Scotland, the Scottish Curriculum and Assessment 5–14 Programme is an essential part of the initiative that has been promoted by HM Inspectorate as upholding and maintaining the standard of pupils' achievements in Scottish schools. A Scottish Education Department (SED) consultative paper enjoined the inspectorate to ‘pay particular attention in their inspection of schools to the extent to which schools and education authorities have had regard to the national curricular policies’ (SE
Author(s): The Open University

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1.1 Introduction

In this unit you will find a discussion of the national curricula framework in Scotland. This is discussed in terms of the literacy curricula, and compared to the framework set up in England and Wales.

This comparison reveals differing emphases on a number of themes. For example, individual child-centred approaches are evident in the Scottish Curriculum Guideline developments. However, a uniform approach to all children is privileged in the whole-class approaches in the English Nationa
Author(s): The Open University

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Introduction

In this unit you will find a discussion of the national curriculam framework in Scotland. This is discussed in terms of the literacy curricula, and compared to the framework set up in England and Wales.

This comparison reveals differing emphases on a number of themes. For example, individual child-centred approaches are evident in the Scottish Curriculum Guideline developments. However, a uniform approach to all children is privileged in the whole-class approaches in the English Nation
Author(s): The Open University

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4.3 Formats

OpenLearn units can be downloaded or taken away in several formats:

  • Print Format

  • Unit Content XML

  • Unit Content RSS

  • OU XML Package

  • IMS Content Package

  • IMS Common Cartridge

  • Plain Zip

  • Moodle Backup

At the asset level the major formats you will find are:

  • text in XML or PDF

  • animation
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2 Online learning – What does the research tell us?

Marion Coomey and John Stephenson review a range of research to try to set out what designers of online learning should learn from experience.

Activity 2

1 hour 0 minutes

Read the article by
Author(s): The Open University

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1.2 Copyright and OER

I assume that you are reading this unit because you would like to create a unit similar to the materials that you can find on the OpenLearn website. You therefore have a teaching purpose and are particularly interested in the use of online tuition. Hopefully you are also keen to share your teaching materials with others in OpenLearn Works. But why bother creating a new Open Educational Resource? Surely there is so much material already available for free on the web anyway!

I would answe
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Acknowledgements

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see terms and conditions), this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence

Author details

Sue Platt has been a school governor for 21 years, at both primary and sec
Author(s): The Open University

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