3.4.1 Try some yourself

Activity 24

For each of the following calculations make suitable rough estimates before doing the calculation on your calculator and check the result.

  • (a) 22.12 ÷ 4.12


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How to Use the Quadratic Formula to Solve Algebraic Equations 
Using the quadratic formula to solve equations may bring one, two, or no algebraic solutions. The quadratic formula is special to quadratic equations. Run time 03:24.
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3.3.1 Try some yourself

Activity 22

A friend has been quoted a price of £25.50 per square yard for tarmac surfacing of his yard. The yard measures 6 yards by 10 feet. Here is his calculation of the total cost. What is wrong with it?

cost =
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3.2 Relationship between complex numbers and points in the plane

We have seen in Section 2.2 that the complex number system is obtained by defining arithmetic operations on the set R × R. We also know that elements of R × R can be represented as points in a plane. It seems reasonable to ask what insight can be obtained by representing complex numbers as p
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2.3 Measuring mass

The basic SI unit for mass is the kilogram, symbol kg

The tonne (t) which is equivalent to 1000 kg and is a metric unit is often used alongside the SI units.

The animation below illustrates how to convert between the most commonly used units of mass, the metric tonnne (t); the kilogram (kg); the gram (g); the milligram (mg) and the microgram (μg).

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1.5 Decimals

Quantities can be smaller than one (such as 0.5 kg) or take values between whole numbers (such as a height of 1.65 metres). Numbers smaller than one are expressed as decimals or as fractions. Decimals are often easier to work with (especially when using a calculator). Decimals are explained in this section, and fractions following that (Section 1.7).

Decimals can be indicated on the number line in between whole numbers. 0.5 and 1.65 are indicated on the figure below.

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Long Vowels Song – Learn to Read – Learning Upgrade
From the Reading Upgrade course.  (01:55)
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Learning outcomes

By the end of this unit you will be able to:

  • divide one number by another;

  • divide using decimals;

  • practise your division skills.


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Exploring equality and equity in education
This free course, Exploring equality and equity in education, considers the complexity of social justice as applied to education and reflects on the different purposes of, and value ascribed to, education in different countries and cultures. It discusses different conceptions of 'justice' and the distinction between equity and equality. First published on T
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Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2

Introduction

Requires that Windows desktop be used in parallel with reading the book.

Tables and charts are a great way to present numerical information in a clear and concise form. This unit explains how to use the Windows calculator to carry out basic operations and calculate percentages. You will then learn how to use charts and tables to represent and interpret information.

This material is from our archive and is an adapted extract from Networked living: exploring information and commu
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Virtual Reality: an approach for building Makkah?s architectural identity
This paper explores a new approach in the architectural design process aiming to construct Makkah's architectural identity. Makkah, which is a city of unique sacred values, has been losing its battle to preserve it heritage buildings. Traditional districts with their heritage buildings have been cleared in order to construct skyscrapers to accommodate the increasing number of pilgrims. While some argue for preserving heritage buildings others insist in building more skyscrapers. Within these con
Author(s): Al-Barqawi, Wadia

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2.5 Defining surfaces

In Section 2.1 we gave a provisional definition of a surface. The aim of this section is to formalise that definition. To do that, we need to specify three further requirements of a candidate topological space, beyond those given in the provisional definition.

The first requirement is that the surface should be in
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4.5: The mode

The USA workforce data in Table 2 were usefully summarised in Figure 6, w
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Física I (2015)
El temario de la asignatura de Física I tiene como objetivo sentar las bases de las leyes y principios de la Mecánica Clásica. Se trata de una asignatura de carácter básico y aplicado dentro de la Física General centrada en la formación científico-técnica del alumno. El enfoque que se le da a la Mecánica siendo básico se haya orientado a la aplicación de esta materia al futuro mundo profesional de los ingenieros aeroespaciales. De esta manera se incide notablemente en el estudio del
Author(s): José Carlos Jiménez,Santiago Ramírez de la Pisc

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Copyright 2009, by the Contributing Authors

5.1 Introduction

We have seen some of the difficulties that Mrs Biggs has faced when formulating a sufficiently general and sufficiently specific rule to deal with the conduct of the visitors to her garden. In Part D we take things a step further by looking at some of the difficulties which may arise when it comes to interpreting rules such as the one developed (with your help) by Mrs Biggs. In particular, we will be exploring the way in which our understanding of the language used in rules affects our interp
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Learning outcomes

After studying this course, you should be able to:

  • understand and use the following terms: boxplots, box, whisker, upper and lower adjacent values, rate, time series, line plot

  • demonstrate an awareness of the idea that the general pattern of a set of data, in terms of location, dispersion and skewness, can be graphically represented in a boxplot

  • understand that boxplots can be used to provide a quick and simple comparison of data sets


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Pop Quiz: Parent Involvement
How well are you doing at being involved in your child's education?  (01:31)
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8.2 The diversity of Hinduism

The complex tradition now known as Hinduism has emerged largely from the coming together of four main elements:

  1. The traditions of the original inhabitants of India, some of which may still continue in the cultures of India's more remote tribal peoples.

  2. The influences of the Indus Valley civilisation that flourished in northwest India until approximately the middle of the second millenium bce.

    <
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2.2.2 Hollow tubing surfaces

In their doughnut-shaped representation, toruses can be thought of as being hollow tubes. Many other surfaces in space can also be drawn as if they were made of hollow tubing. Figure 15 shows two such examples.

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4.2.1 First computer (your computer)

In the block diagram, the computer receives data from the user and sends it into the network. It will manipulate and also store and retrieve data.

If you send a message to a FirstClass conference, your computer receives the message from you as data via the keyboard. The computer manipulates the data into a form that can be sent into the network, in this case the internet via your internet service provider (ISP). Your computer will also store or retrieve relevant data, such as details of
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