Nijntje : Spelletjes, kleurplaten en een voorleesverhaaltje
Nijntje.png

Op deze site vinden leerlingen verschillende spelletjes rond Nijntje:

  • muziek maken en beluisteren,
  • kleurplaten,
  • filmpjes bekijken,
  • zoek de verschillen,
  • memory,
  • voorleesboekje,
  • ...

Author(s): No creator set

License information
Related content

Mathematical analysis
This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. It is as taught in 2009-2010. This module introduces mathematical analysis building upon the experience of limits of sequences and properties of real numbers and on calculus. It includes limits and continuity of functions between Euclidean spaces, differentiation and integration. A variety of very important new concepts are introduced by investigating the properties of numerous examples, and developing the assoc
Author(s): Feinstein Joel F. Dr.

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by

4.2 Reports

Let's look at reports first.

Activity 3

Note down in your Learning Journal what you consider to be the purpose of a report.

Discussion


Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2016 The Open University

Parts of Flowering Plants
This video shows the parts of a flowering plant. This video discusses the four main parts of the plant, roots, stem, leaves, and the flower. In this discussion it includes what each part does. Great basic video.  Video is good for elementary level students. Run time 03:46.
Author(s): No creator set

License information
Related content

3.4 Decreasing by a percentage

Discount can be calculated in the same way as an increase by a percentage. For example, £8 with 15% discount means you actually pay

  £8 less (15% of £8)

  15% of 8 = × 8 =
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2013 The Open University

21L.017 The Art of the Probable: Literature and Probability (MIT)
"The Art of the Probable" addresses the history of scientific ideas, in particular the emergence and development of mathematical probability. But it is neither meant to be a history of the exact sciences per se nor an annex to, say, the Course 6 curriculum in probability and statistics. Rather, our objective is to focus on the formal, thematic, and rhetorical features that imaginative literature shares with texts in the history of probability. These shared issues include (but are not limited to)
Author(s): Jackson, Noel,Raman, Shankar,Kibel, Alvin

License information
Related content

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative C

Learning outcomes

After studying this course, you should be able to:

  • demonstrate an awareness of the roles and responsibilities of the modern scientist

  • demonstrate an insight as a scientist into the social and ethical aspects of scientific research

  • understand the rationale and role of certain contemporary tools for science governance, especially public and stakeholder engagement/consultation

  • recognise opportunities to contribute to discussion and debat
    Author(s): The Open University

    License information
    Related content

    Copyright © 2016 The Open University

References

Adams, B., Breazeal, C., Brooks, R. and Scassellati, B. (2000) ‘Humanoid robots: a new kind of tool’, IEEE Intelligent Systems, 15, 25–31.
Block, N. (1995) ‘On a confusion about a function of consciousness’, Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 18, 227–47.
Block, N., Flanagan, O. and Güzeldere, G. (eds) (1997), The Nature of Consciousness: Philosophical
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2016 The Open University

2.2 Surfaces in space

In this section we present a wide range of examples of surfaces in space.


Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2016 The Open University

1.6.6 Professional bodies and societies

Consider joining a learned society or professional organisation. They can be very useful for conference bulletins as well as in-house publications, often included in the subscription. Don't forget to ask about student rates. Try looking for the websites of learned societies associated with your subject area (e.g. The Royal Society, the Author(s): The Open University

4.2 Subdivisions

In this subsection we formalise the idea of a net by introducing a useful concept called a subdivision of a surface. This is a standard kind of net drawn on a surface, and is defined in terms of vertices, edges and faces. It leads to the idea of the Euler characteristic of the surface.

All surfaces obtained from polygons by identifying edges arise from a net (of sorts) consisting of a single polygonal face, together with the edges and vertices that remain aft
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2016 The Open University

Alien Encounter Answer
Mathematical logical puzzle.
Author(s): No creator set

License information
Related content

3.3 What can genres do for you?

Think of it like this: each genre novel suggests certain char
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2016 The Open University

1.4 Summary of Unit A2

In this unit, you have learned about boxplots and about ways of dealing with data given in tabular form.

A boxplot is a way of presenting certain summary statistics and other characteristics of a data set in graphical form. It gives a quick graphical impression of the location, dispersion and the general pattern of skewness in data set, as well as drawing attention to unusually large or small values. In comparing two or more data sets, it is often useful to draw comparative boxplots (th
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2013 The Open University

3.1.1 Try some yourself

Activity 19

In a supermarket the bill comes to £8.70, and you have discount coupons worth £3.50. The assistant says ‘that will be £12.20 please’. Is she right?


Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2016 The Open University

TALAT Lecture 1601: Process modelling applied to age hardening aluminium alloys
This lecture describes the methodology for physical modelling of materials problems, with particular emphasis on heat treatment and welding of age hardening alloys materials; it establishes mathematical relations between different process variables (e.g. alloy composition, heat treatment procedure, welding conditions) and the alloy strength or hardness, based on sound physical principles (e.g. thermodynamics, kinetic theory, dislocation mechanics); it motivates faster process development, optimi
Author(s): TALAT,Ø Grong, The Norwegian Institute of Technol

License information
Related content

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

3.3 Initial position and the intercept of the position-time graph

The uniform motion of a particle is such a simple form of motion that apart from enquiring about the particle's velocity, the only other kinematic question you can ask is 'where was the particle at some particular time?' The most common way of answering this question is to specify the initial position of the particle, that is, its position at time t = 0 s.

Although it is common to refer to the position at t = 0 as the 'initial position' it is also possible, and some
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2016 The Open University

1.3.1 Try some yourself

Activity 1

Round the numbers below:

  • (a) to the nearest 10.

  • (b) to the nearest 100.

  • (c) to the nearest 1000.

 
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2016 The Open University

Using and managing waste
Do you know what happens to the things you throw away? Sustainable management of municipal and industrial waste is essential in any society, but is particularly crucial for a future in which we face diminishing resources and a growing population. This album considers the issues that are driving the waste management industry across the EU, looking in depth at processes of recycling, landfill, incineration, obtaining energy from waste, and composting. In the bonus audio tracks Professor Andrew Por
Author(s): The iTunes U team

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2

George Washington Carver: "I'm a Peanut, Let Me Be!" | SUNG HISTORY
George Washington Carver was a great friend of the farmer... but he's a peanut's worst nightmare! (02:27)
Author(s): No creator set

License information
Related content