8.2 The diversity of Hinduism

The complex tradition now known as Hinduism has emerged largely from the coming together of four main elements:

  1. The traditions of the original inhabitants of India, some of which may still continue in the cultures of India's more remote tribal peoples.

  2. The influences of the Indus Valley civilisation that flourished in northwest India until approximately the middle of the second millenium bce.

    <
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USAWC celebrates Army Birthday
With a loud and thunderous, "Hooah," and a mighty, but controlled, swing of a 1902 cavalry saber replica, the U.S. Army War College cut a ceremonial cake and celebrated the Army's 237th Birthday by honoring Soldiers, veterans, and civilians and family members past and present today at the Army Heritage and Education Center.
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7.4 Understanding RFID tags

An RFID tag consists of a microchip and an antenna and some kind of encapsulation, such as epoxy resin, to bind the two together and protect them. Tags come in a variety of shapes and sizes (Figure 20), and are generally one of two main types: active or passive. You'll be lea
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1 Developing modelling skills

The main teaching text of this course is provided in the workbook below. The answers to the exercises that you'll find throughout the workbook are given in the answer book. You can access it by clicking on the link under the workbook.

Click the link below to open the workbook (PDF, 0.2 MB).

workbook

Click the link below to open the answerbook (PDF, 0.1 MB).<
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7.4 Evaluating your strategy and assessing your work

Present a reflective summary that gives details of:

  • a judgement of your own progress and performance in the IT skills you set out to improve, including an assessment of where you feel you have made the greatest progress; discuss your use of criteria and feedback comments to help you assess your progress;

  • those factors that had the greatest effect on you achieving what you set out to do; include those that worked well to help you improve
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Quantum field theory
This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. Last taught in Spring Semester 2006 A compilation of fourteen lectures in PDF format on the subject of quantum field theory. This module is suitable for 3rd or 4th year undergraduate and postgraduate level learners. Suitable for year 3/4 undergraduate and postgraduate study. Dr Kirill Krasnov, School of Mathematical Sciences Dr Kirill Krasnov is a Lecturer at the University of Nottingham. After studying physic
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Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by

3.2.1 Remarks

  1. By ‘contains’, we mean that we can find part of the surface that is homeomorphic to a Möbius band. The edge of the Möbius band does not need to correspond to an edge at the surface, so that a surface without boundary can be non-orientable (as we shall shortly see).

  2. When seeking Möbius bands in a surface, it can be helpful to look at all possible closed curves on the surface and thicken these into bands.

  3. Remember, fro
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5.3.4 Recommendations and opinions

These have no binding force and therefore are ineffective as Community law. However, they can have ‘persuasive authority’. If a recommendation or opinion is ignored, it may later be followed up with a stronger legislative initiative, such as a decision or directive.

Activity 4 The EU law-making process
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6.2 Turning the spotlight on your work

Having established some general principles, try now to subject your own work to the same scrutiny.

Activity 14

Take one of your most recent essays or reports and ask yourself, ‘What does it look like?’ That is, d
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5: Conclusion

In this course, you have been introduced to a number of ways of representing data graphically and of summarizing data numerically. We began by looking at some data sets and considering informally the kinds of questions they might be used to answer.

An important first stage in any assessment of a collection of data, preceding any numerical analysis, is to represent the data, if possible, in some informative diagrammatic way. Useful graphical representations that you have met in this cour
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3.1.4 (D) Cause and correlation

Pupils should be taught to distinguish between two types of relationship in science – causal, where there is a known mechanism relating an effect to a cause; and correlational, where identified variables are associated statistically but for which there is no well-established causal link.


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3.1.3 (C) Scientific methods and critical testing

Pupils should be taught that science uses the experimental method to test ideas, and, in particular, about certain basic techniques such as the use of controls. It should be made clear that the outcome of a single experiment is rarely sufficient to establish a knowledge claim.


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2 What is science?

In all subjects – and science no less so than others – definitions are problematic. At one level, science is a body of knowledge about the natural world. But this begs the question: what is peculiar about scientific knowledge as opposed to, taking just one example, an explanation of the origin of the Universe rooted in folklore and superstition? Others might argue that the scientific approach is unique – that the processes involved in doing science are distinct. That might
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1 Course overview

In this course we'll be concerned with what type of science forms the basis of science education, and for what purpose. You'll explore these issues by reading the text that follows and by tackling the activities that are included; there are also a number of readings. In the latter part of this course (Sections 10–14) we'll consider some of the practical problems involved in delivering an effective curriculum in science and look at key questions relevant to all three educational tiers
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4 Reflection on this course

To review and consolidate the learning which you have gained from studying this course, you might like to consider the following questions:

  • Has studying the course changed your ideas in any way about what a ‘business’ is?

  • Why do you think that different ways of running a business have developed under English law (e.g. sole trader, partnership, company)?

  • What do you think are the advantages and disadvantages of running
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3.5.1 Review of skills

Activities 5, 8 and 9 allowed you to demonstrate numeracy s
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3.5 Review of learning outcomes

Decide for yourself, by working through the table below, whether you have satisfied the learning outcomes for Part B.

I am confident that I have a sufficiently comprehensive understanding to enable me to move on.I am sufficiently confident in my understanding to enable me to move on, but I am aware that I need to revisit the material later.I
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3.4.2 Key characteristics of a partnership

In Part B, Section 2, we noted some of the key characteristics of being a sole trader. You may wish to briefly review that section before proceeding, as in the remaining activities in Part B, we will consider those same characteristics in the context of a partnership. First, we will look at those characteristics which give rise to issues as between the partners
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3.4.1 What is a partnership?

Persons who run a business together are said to be in partnership. Partnership is the second form of business organisation at which we shall look, and we will explore what a partnership is, in the eyes of the law, in the next activity.

Activity 6: Nature of a partnership

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