Traffic Paradoxes and Route Guidance: Effective Ways of Reducing Congestion Effects?
It is well know that we cannot engineer our way out of traffic congestion by building new roads. In fact, expanding the road network may paradoxically attract new traffic, and increase gridlock. Andreas Schulz provides a mathematical explanation for this conundrum. Using Nash equilibria and related game-theoretic concepts he
Author(s): No creator set

License information
Related content

6.251J Introduction to Mathematical Programming (MIT)
This course offers an introduction to optimization problems, algorithms, and their complexity, emphasizing basic methodologies and the underlying mathematical structures. The main topics covered include: Theory and algorithms for linear programming Network flow problems and algorithms Introduction to integer programming and combinatorial problems
Author(s): John Tsitsiklis

License information
Related content

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative C

References
The Egyptians are known for being ahead of their time in comparison to some civilisations that came after them. This unit looks at how the Egyptians solved mathematical problems in everyday life and the technology they used. An understanding of this area has only been possible following the translation of the Rosetta Stone.
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2

Learning outcomes
The Egyptians are known for being ahead of their time in comparison to some civilisations that came after them. This unit looks at how the Egyptians solved mathematical problems in everyday life and the technology they used. An understanding of this area has only been possible following the translation of the Rosetta Stone.
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2

Guide to Homeschooling - How to Homeschool
Are you looking for a guide to homeschooling? Inside this video you'll discover how to get started homeschooling.

Topics Covered Include:
Homeschool Methods & Homeschool Styles
Homeschool State Laws
Homeschoolers Guide, Guide to Homeschooling
How to Homeschool
Choosing a Homeschool Curriculum
Homeschooling Guide, Homeschool Manual
Homeschooling Questions
Homeschooling Help
Home Schooling Book
Help with Home Schooling

Author(s): No creator set

License information
Related content

References

Bills, C. (2002) ‘Mental mathematics’ in Haggarty, L. (ed.), Aspects of Teaching Secondary Mathematics: Perspectives on Practice, London, Routledge.
Mason, J. (1988) ‘Imagery, imagination and mathematics classrooms’ in Pimm, D. (ed.), Mathematics, Teachers and Children, Sevenoaks, Hodder and Stoughton.
The Open University (1988) ME234 Using
Author(s): No creator set

License information
Related content

Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

Acknowledgements
This unit is the third in the MSXR209 series of five units on mathematical modellng. It provides an overview of the processes involved in developing models, starting by explaining how to specify the purpose of the model. It then moves on to look at aspects involved in creating models, such as simplifying problems, choosing variables and parameters, formulating relationships and finding solutions. You will also look at interpreting results and evaluating models. This unit assumes that you have pr
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2

Acknowledgements
This unit is the fourth in the MSXR209 series of five units on mathematical modelling. In this unit you will be taken through the whole modelling process in detail, from creating a first simple model, through evaluating it, to the subsequent revision of the model by changing one of the assumptions. The problem that will be examined is one based on heat transfer. This unit assumes you have studied Modelling pollution in the Great Lakes (MSXR209_1), Analysing skid marks (MSXR209_2) and Developing
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2

Learning outcomes
This unit is the fourth in the MSXR209 series of five units on mathematical modelling. In this unit you will be taken through the whole modelling process in detail, from creating a first simple model, through evaluating it, to the subsequent revision of the model by changing one of the assumptions. The problem that will be examined is one based on heat transfer. This unit assumes you have studied Modelling pollution in the Great Lakes (MSXR209_1), Analysing skid marks (MSXR209_2) and Developing
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2

Acknowledgements
This is the fifth and final unit in the MSXR209 series on mathematical modelling. In this unit we revisit the model developed in the first unit of this series on pollution in the Great Lakes of North America. Here we evaluate and revise the original model by comparing its predictions against data from the lakes before finally reflecting on the techniques used. This unit assumes you have studied Modelling pollution in the Great Lakes (MSXR209_1), Analysing skid marks (MSXR209_2), Developing model
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2

Learning outcomes
This is the fifth and final unit in the MSXR209 series on mathematical modelling. In this unit we revisit the model developed in the first unit of this series on pollution in the Great Lakes of North America. Here we evaluate and revise the original model by comparing its predictions against data from the lakes before finally reflecting on the techniques used. This unit assumes you have studied Modelling pollution in the Great Lakes (MSXR209_1), Analysing skid marks (MSXR209_2), Developing model
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2

Learning outcomes
We all encounter symmetry in our everyday lives, in both natural and man-made structures. The mathematical concepts surrounding symmetry can be a bit more difficult to grasp. This unit explains such concepts as direct and indirect symmetries, Cayley tables and groups through exercises, audio and video.
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2

Learning outcomes
Active galaxies provide a prime example of high energy processes operating in the Universe. This unit gives an overview of active galaxies, including the supermassive black holes that power the engines at their centres, and the emission processes by which we detect and study them. It also gives practice in mathematical techniques for analysing data and theoretical models.
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2

Google History
How Google evolved from 'page rank' - a mathematical algorithm. See the idea behind the Master Plan, and its 'Don't be Evil' philosophy. The question of privacy on Google is controversial - and addressed in this video. (3:15)
Author(s): No creator set

License information
Related content

Private Universe Project in Mathematics: Workshop 2. Are You Convinced?
Proof making is one of the key ideas in mathematics. Looking at teachers and students grappling with the same probability problem, we see how two kinds of proof—proof by cases and proof by induction—naturally grow out of the need to justify and convince others.,Englewood, New Jersey—Teachers Workshop Englewood, a town with unsatisfactory student test scores, is implementing a long-term project to improve math achievement. As part of a professional development workshop designed in part to give
Author(s): Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics

License information
Related content

Smithsonian Institution-Astrophysical Observatory "All Rights Reserved"

Learning Content and Interoperability
In the era of Internet and new information and communication technologies one of the most important things is appropriate use of technologies in order to achieve desired results. In present paper, they are compared two case studies – on one hand there they are presented research results about interoperability in two open-source learning environments developed in Sofia University, Bulgaria and, on other hand, there are given results from “South West Wales Interoperability Project”, sponsore
Author(s): Aleksieva Adelina,Petrov Milen,Bontchev Boyan

License information
Related content

Rights not set

A Layered Framework for Evaluating Online Collaborative Learning Interactions
Evaluating on-line collaborative learning interactions is a complex task due to the variety of elements and factors that take place and intervene in the way a group of students comes together to collaborate in order to achieve a learning goal. The aim of this paper is to provide a better understanding of group interaction and determine how to best support the collaborative learning process. To that end, we propose a principled framework for the study and analysis of group interaction and group s
Author(s): Daradoumis Thanasis,Martinez Alejandra,Xhafa Fatos

License information
Related content

Rights not set

Never enough time - Electronic literary exercises in an Italian lower secondary school.
Not available,Unpublished ethnographic material, Université de Liège - Laboratoire d'Anthropologie de la Communication
Author(s): Magli Rossella

License information
Related content

Rights not set

Environnements interactifs d'apprentissage et démonstration en géométrie
Not available,Habilitation à diriger des recherches de l'université de Rennes I, juillet 2001.
Author(s): Py Dominique

License information
Related content

Rights not set

Un questionnaire dynamique pour le suivi et l'analyse de l'activité et des productions d'élèves e
L'argumentation des réponses fournies par l'apprenant est-elle riche de sens pour aider à 'établissement d'un diagnostic sur ses connaissances ? L'activité de simulation faite par les élèves peut-elle être un élément déstabilisateur de conceptions ? Une remédiation peut-elle s'opérer par le biais d'un scénario pédagogique? Autant de questions auxquelles nous tenterons de répondre dans cet article.
Author(s): Michelet Sandra,Luengo Vanda,Adam Jean-Michel

License information
Related content

Rights not set