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4 Questions

Now try to answer the following questions, to remind you of some of the things you have learned and test your understanding of them.

Question 9

To the nearest order of magnitude, how much greater is the estimated
Author(s): The Open University

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Festival of Britain AA001685

*

Royal Festival Hall, Belvedere Road, South Bank, Lambeth, London. The hall and shot tower from Hungerford Bridge. The tower was built in 1826 and incorporated into the development of the bank for the Festival of Britain in 1951. It was demolished shortly afterwards. Photographed by S W Rawlings.
© Historic England


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2.6.1 course summary

  1. Laws summarise regularities observed in Nature. They can summarise large numbers of similar phenomena and make it possible to predict the course of particular phenomena.

  2. In physics, many of the laws are expressed mathematically and concern measurable quantities. This aids precision and clarity, and it supports rational argument.

  3. Newtonian mechanics is based on equations (Newton's laws of motion, Newton's law of universal gravita
    Author(s): The Open University

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30. Another Central Plan Fails
<img src="http://mises.org//media/poster/6858" vspace="4" hspace="4" style="margin: 10px;" /><br />

8.3.1 Identify opportunities for using problem-solving skills

Where and how will you use problem-solving skills over the next 3–4 months? What opportunities do you have to develop your skills? For example, you may be working on a course project with a defined goal but the best route to that goal is not clear; you might be involved in contributing to the design of a system, improving its performance or investigating the feasibility of ideas; you may be involved in resolving resource or staffing difficulties, or in planning a major event.

Problems
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1.5.6 Copyright - what you need to know

An original piece of work, whether it is text, music, pictures, sound recordings, web pages, etc., is protected by copyright law and may often have an accompanying symbol (©) and/or legal statement.. In the UK it is the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988 which regulates this.

In most circumstances, works protected by copyright can be used in whole or in part only with the permission of the owner. In some cases this permission results in a fee.

However, the UK legislation inc
Author(s): The Open University

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3.2.1 Try some yourself

1 Convert each of the following to percentages. Round off the percentages to whole numbers.

  • (a)

    • (i) 0.8

    • (ii) 0.21

    • (iii) 0.70


      Author(s): The Open University

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6.1 What are aims and objectives/outcomes?

It is best to start to settle on the aims and objectives/outcomes (these terms are variously used around the world but are largely interchangeable) of your free course as soon as possible. You looked at the intended learning outcomes of some courses in Section 1. The difference between aims and objectives is that the aim is the general statement of what you hope the course will achieve, usually expressed in terms of what you will be presenting in the course; the objectives are what you intend
Author(s): The Open University

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The Economist asks: Tony Blair
Can Brexit be stopped? 29th March is the trigger day for Britain leaving the EU. Former British prime minister Tony Blair has put himself at the helm of a fightback. But can he succeed and are "liberal elites" an answer or the problem? Anne McElvoy hosts.
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4.2 ATM layers

In this section I shall briefly review some of the main functions of the ATM layers but I shall not go into too much detail because at this stage we are interested in only the general points about protocols.


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4.13.3 Scrutiny

Again, connected to the accountability issue is the problem of adequate scrutiny. The detailed, technical and specific nature of much-delegated legislation means that, on the whole, Members of Parliament (the elected representatives) do not have the expertise to consider proposed legislation effectively. In addition, you have already noted that the scrutiny committees themselves only have limited powers.


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4.1 First aid

It is not required that students be trained in first aid. It is, however, important that a first aid kit is carried when you are likely to be away from immediate assistance. First aid must be rendered at once, and medical and relief help should be sought if necessary. It is important that appropriate first aid skills for use in the field are understood by those who might need them and that the procedures for enlisting help are known.

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#353: From Proletariat to Precariat: Navigating Uncertainty in a Globalised Economy

American labor historian Leon Fink discusses the rise of the Precariat -- people in developed economies in a permanent state of underemployment or intermittent work due to changes in working conditions since the 19th century. Presented by Elisabeth Lopez.

Author(s): up-close@unimelb.edu.au (University of Melbourne)

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SIFUD-PP Paris 2016 : Utiliser un renforcement prothétique après 80 ans est-il raisonnable ? ...

Conférence d'Experts de la SIFUD-PP du 22 Janvier 2016- Paris

Titre : Utiliser un renforcement prothétique après 80 ans est-il raisonnable ?

Auteur (s) : B. Fatton (Nîmes)

PROGRAMME VENDREDI 22 JANVIER 2016


08h50 OUVERTURE : ...
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3.2 Contexts

On their own, sensory perceptions don't tend to mean that much. They depend on a context in which they can be brought to life: for instance, that of a character. Such sensory perceptions as you've just listed in Activity 4 might hold more meaning if the man who twitches the curtains was the character smelling the smells or touching the surfaces; if his neighbour in the purple sari was the character hearing the noises, tasting the flavours. Sensory perceptions offer dimensions that will enrich
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Learning outcomes

After studying this unit you will be able to:

  • appreciate the historical development of ‘Europe’ as a political and economic entity;

  • understand the rationale for the emergence of the idea of ‘Europe’ in policy making;

  • see the difficulty in defining what Europe is and its limits;

  • understand the contested nature of the idea of Europe;

  • understand that ‘Europe’ is not coterminous with the European Union;


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5.1 Introduction

There are several types of diabetes, including two that are common: Type 1 and Type 2. Type 2 is the most common sort of diabetes. Worldwide, about 90 per cent of people with diabetes have Type 2 and about 10 per cent have Type 1. The other sorts of diabetes account for very small numbers of people.


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DILS: Prime Minister Lamothe (Haiti)
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Capacitaci?n docente en tecnolog?as de informaci?n y comunicaci?n hacia la conformaci?n de redes col
The Academic Upgrade Program (.Capacitaci?n Docente.) is been developed in the contexto of a MECESUP project (government funding assignments for education) at the FAU of Universidad de Chile. This program is about upgrading knowledge and user capabilities in Information and Communication Technologies (IT) of our academic team, in order to improve our pedagogical model, and to include these IT into the learning-teaching process for Architecture, Design and Geography. Considering that new technolo
Author(s): Andr?s Cavieres; Christian Beros; Maria Loreto Flo

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3.2 Understanding James's account

James's thesis is striking, but there are some issues that need to be clarified. Before going on to assess James's argument for his thesis, I will explore his position by raising three questions about his account.

First, what kinds of bodily changes are required for an emotion to take place? James mentions three kinds of change:

  • (a) internal changes (increase in heart rate)

  • (b) involuntary expressive behaviour (weeping)

  • <
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