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World War I: Germans Attack U.S. Navy Boats
In this History Rewind video clip, take a step back in time to the beginning of World War 1. The repeated sinking of American ships caused President Wilson to declare war. Watch the historic black and white footage of some of the attacks, but there is no sound so it lacks depth.
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Learning outcomes

After studying this course, you should be able to:

  • explain the meaning of the emboldened terms and symbols, and use them appropriately

  • state the equation of continuity and use it in simple problems

  • state the conditions under which Ampère's law is true and explain why it does not apply more generally

  • state the Ampère–Maxwell law and explain why it has a greater domain of validity than Ampère's law

  • state and name the
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1.1.5 Late-onset single-gene disorders

An individual might know that a late-onset disease such as Huntington's disease (HD) is present in their immediate family and that they might have inherited the disease gene(s). The problems of genetic testing for HD revolve around the fact that it is pre-symptomatic.

One dilemma is the long delay between testing positive and developing the clinical symptoms of the disorder in middle age. Is it better not to know and live in hope, or as one victim cried ‘get it over, I'm so tir
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8 Paired samples T-Tests

Activity 7

0 hours 20 minutes

This activity introduces the paired samples t-test. It is also known as the ‘within participants’ or ‘related’ t-test. It is used when your design is within pa
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5 Designer babies?

A character under genetic influence where the distinction between treatment and enhancement is hard to draw is height. Treatment of short stature – with human growth hormone made in genetically manipulated bacteria – has already given rise to controversy about how short a child needs to be for treatment to count as meeting a medical need. That is, how tall is tall enough?

As we identify genes that have effects on many other human characters, from appearance to, perhaps, intelligence
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Acknowledgements

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see terms and conditions), this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence

Grateful acknowledgement is made to the following sources for permission to reproduce materia
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4.6 P is for Provenance

The provenance of a piece of information (i.e. who produced it? where did it come from?) may provide another useful clue to its reliability. It represents the 'credentials' of a piece of information that support its status and perceived value. It is therefore very important to be able to identify the author, sponsoring body or source of your information.

Why is this important?

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Introduction

This unit explores school geography, focusing upon how geography is currently being taught and understood. While studying this unit you will read about the significance of geography as a subject, considering what are the defining concepts for school geography and its educational value. The unit also includes a lesson plan and a look at definitions of geography as a medium of education.


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01B - Introduction à la culture numérique (CN16-17) (suite) (audio)

Cours commun de culture numérique 2016-2017 - Hervé Le Crosnier

Cours commun M1-DNR2i, Licence Professionnelle ATP, M1-EMT, M1-ESPE, M2-MDS, M2-Green

Cours 1
16 septembre
- Introduction : qu’entend-on par culture numérique

Cours 2
23 septembre
- Histoire technique et sociale de l'informatique et de l'internet

Cours 3
30 septembre - Le ...
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2.1.1 The morality play

Before looking at the play's opening scene I should add a brief note on the medieval morality play, the type of drama on which Marlowe draws in adapting The Damnable Life for the stage. After the Prologue and Faustus's long opening speech, you may have been startled by the appearance of the Good and Evil Angels. Even if you had expected to find supernatural beings in a play about a man who sells his soul to the devil, the Good and Evil Angels may have struck you as strange, perh
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3.5 Summary

Phenomenologists focus on how bodies are experienced at a subjective and intersubjective (relational) level. Phenomenological psychologists seek to transcend the mind-body dualism, arguing that all we have is an intelligent body, with the body and mind one and the same: not simply biology; we are our body and, through this, perform selfhood. This bodily experience is also often pre-reflective and extra-discursive – we experience and use our body before we think about it. And it is through u
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4.2 Frequency, wavelength and the speed of sound

The speed of sound has a joint relationship with both the wavelength and the frequency of the sound. To see why, recall that at the end of Section 2.5, in connection with the wave produced by a tuning fork, I said ‘in the time it has taken for the source to go through one cycle of oscillation, the wave h
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8 Part B: Evidencing your IT skills

This Part requires you to present a portfolio of your work to demonstrate that you have used and integrated your IT skills within your study or work activities to achieve the standard required. For example, you might include learning about new software for a particular task, using databases and other resources more effectively in searching for information, setting up and using different ways of communicating and sharing information, setting up and using computer-based models to predict, expla
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1 6. Conclusion

This unit has explored the ways in which moving and still images may motivate and inspire pupils in their understanding of music. You may find it helpful to share your experiences of using images with your peers, perhaps through a short presentation to your department.


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355 GG Subject Object
Why "I love you" is the easiest way ever to remember the difference between subject and object.
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Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Olmsted County, Minnesota, 1976-2008.
By: WentzMR Dr. W. Ray Kim, Associate Professor of Medicine and Hepatologist at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN, discusses his article appearing in the January 2012 issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings, reporting on a 2-fold increase in the incidence of liver cancer during the past 3 decades, primarily in conjunction with the rate of hepatitis C infection. Available at: http://www.mayoclinicproceedings.org/article/S0025-6196(11)00004-8/fulltext
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Hoover Dam and Hydroelectric Power Plant Tour Part 2
This is a series of video clips taken when visiting the Hoover Dam and Hydroelectric Power Plant back on December 28, 2008. Hoover Dam is located at Lake Mead at the Arizona and Nevada State line and just East of Las Vegas on US Highway 93. The highway goes over the dam, but a by pass bridge is being built across the Colorado River just down stream from the dam due to be completed in September of 2009.
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2.1 Reading

Before you begin your interrogation of a text, though, you have to get to know it in a general way. In a sense, you can ‘see’ visual texts (such as paintings, sculptures and buildings) all at once; there they are before you. You can move around them, looking at them from different angles. But with written, aural and moving image texts – in which words, sounds or images follow on from one another – you cannot become familiar with the whole thing until
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Sinking of the Lusitania
In this clip from the Discovery Channel’s special "Sinking of the Lusitania," learn the world wide reaction to the sinking of the British ship. (02:17)
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