3.3 Members of the UK Parliament

Before we look at what an MP does, have a go at this activity.

Activity 2: The work of a Member of the UK Parliament

0 hours 10 minutes

Take a few moments to think about what you have read s
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7 Review of unit learning outcomes

After studying this unit, you should be able to:

  • explain how Acts of Parliament originate:

     

    • party manifestos, national emergency or crisis, Royal Commissions, the Law Commission, Private Members' Bills

  • discuss the process by which rules become law and the role of Parliament in making legal rules:

     

    • first reading, second read
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The House of Commons

The members of the House of Commons are elected by the public, with the country being divided into constituencies and each of these returning one Member of Parliament (known as an MP). There must be a general election every five years, though an election can be called sooner by the Prime Minister. The Government of the day is generally formed by the political party which has the most MPs elected to the House of Commons. The Prime Minister will usually be the leader of the largest political pa
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2.1 Key themes and learning outcomes

The key themes of Part A are:

  • company;

  • business;

  • capital.

After studying Part A, you should be able to:

  • describe in general terms what a business is;

  • demonstrate an appreciation of the concept of capital.

 

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4 An overview of the legal history of Scotland

To understand the current system of law making in Scotland it is helpful to know from where it originated. The law in Scotland has a complex history, and has been influenced by a wide range of sources. It has a distinct system from that in England and Wales or Northern Ireland, and remains so today. The distinction comes from both historical developments and the current procedures for law making.

Some of the earliest influences on legal Scotland included native customs, Norse law and We
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The relationship between the EC and the EU

The words ‘European Economic Community’ (EEC), ‘European Community’ (EC) and ‘European Union’ (EU) have already been used in this unit, and many texts and journal and newspaper articles use them interchangeably. It is important that you are clear on their relationship and what they mean. This unit will always refer to the current position as the EU, but what is the relationship between the EC, the EEC and the EU?

As mentioned earlier, the Maastricht Treaty (1992) established
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6.7 Intrinsic aids

Intrinsic aids are matters within an Act itself which may help make the meaning clearer. The court may consider the long title, the short title and any preamble. Other useful internal aids may include headings before a group of sections and any schedules attached to the Act. There are also often marginal notes explaining different sections; however, these are not generally regarded as giving Parliament's intention as they will have been inserted after parliamentary debates and are only helpfu
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Acknowledgements

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Grateful acknowledgement is made to the following sources for permission to reproduce material within this product.

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1.6.2 Beware of first impressions

Representing ‘sums of money, and time, by parts of space’, as Playfair put it, may indeed seem obvious and readily agreed, but nevertheless graphics showing the rise and fall of profits, expenditure or interest rates over time often need to be approached carefully. As the inventor of the bar chart (or bar graph), Playfair might well have raised a quizzical eyebrow at the example in Author(s): The Open University

Acknowledgements

Grateful acknowledgement is made to the following sources for permission to reproduce material in this unit:

The content is taken from an activity written by Marion Hall for students taking courses in Health and Social Care, in particular those studying K101 An Introduction to Health and Social Care. The original activity is one of a set of skills activities made available to all HSC students via the HSC Resource Bank.

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see
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4.3: The median

The median describes the central value of a set of data. Here, to be precise, we are discussing the sample median, in contrast to the population median.

The sample median

The median of a sample of data with an odd number of data values is defined to be the middle value of t
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Digital Library Object - Graphics-oriented battlefield tracking systems: U.S. Army and Air Force int
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