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What's Inside an Elephant Trunk?
Elephant trunks are the most impressive noses in the animal kingdom. Made almost entirely of muscle, elephant trunks can lift hundreds of pounds, suck up gallons of water, and sniff out landmines. But, what's on the inside of an elephant trunk? (03:00)

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The Slaves That Built the White House
(08:24)
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Reinventing Museums for the Digital Generation
Penn Museum Director Julian Siggers is leading a digital transformation of the institution to make it relevant to younger generations.
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Can Restructuring Sears Fix a Catalog of Problems?
The latest revival plan for Sears could benefit the hedge fund that controls it, instead of boosting the retailer, say experts.
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Why Fake News Campaigns Are So Effective
Social media have been "weaponized" with fake news to maximize social discord, writes Wharton professor Eric K. Clemons in this opinion piece. Why does it work so well?
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Can Dolce & Gabbana Recover from Its Mistakes in China?
Italian fashion house Dolce & Gabbana is trying to clean up a public relations mess in China that highlights the importance of cultural sensitivity in a global marketplace.
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Keep on learning

Study another free course

There are more than 800 courses on OpenLearn for you to choose from o
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Base pairing

Nucleic acid folding patterns are dominated by base pairing, which results from the formation of hydrogen bonds between pairs of nucleotides. In nucleic acids, as in proteins, the highly directional nature of this hydrogen bonding is the key to secondary structure.

SAQ 5

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1.2 Nucleic acids: genetic, functional and structural roles in the cell

The first role that one immediately thinks about for nucleic acids is that of an inherited genetic material, principally in the form of DNA. In some cases, the inherited genetic material is RNA instead of DNA. For example, almost 60% of all characterised viruses have RNA genomes and these are more common in plant viruses than in animal viruses. There is considerable variation in the amount of genetic material present within organisms (Author(s): The Open University

7.5 Control measures

7.5.1 Control measures to avoid exposure

There are four main methods of exposure to chemicals:

  1. Inhalation – This is the main method of exposure to volatile solvents and gases.

  2. Skin absorption – Certain chemicals possess the ability to penetrate through pores of skin (for example, mercury compounds and hydrofluor
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References

Huse, M. and Kuriyan, J. (2002) The conformational plasticity of protein kinases, Cell, 109, pp. 275–282.
Lipscomb, W. N., Reeke, G. N. Jr, Hartsuck, J. A., Quiocho, F. A. and Bethge, P. H. (1970) The structure of carboxypeptidase A. 8. Atomic interpretation at 0.2 nm resolution, a new study of the complex of glycyl-L-tyrosine with CPA, and mechanistic deduction
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Keep on learning

Study another free course

There are more than 800 courses on OpenLearn for you to
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Conclusion

This free course provided an introduction to studying Science. It took you through a series of exercises designed to develop your approach to study and learning at a distance and helped to improve your confidence as an independent learner.


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6.1 Basic isotropy

As we have said, the photons in the 3 K background have been practically free from interaction with anything since about 4 × 105 years after the instant of the big bang. The present angular distribution of the microwave radiation – the way in which it is spread across the sky – is therefore almost the same as it was then. The spectrum we find today depends on the temperatures at that time – for the intensity of the radiation in a particular region of the early Unive
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1.2.6 Defining global markets

Global markets for manufactured goods, as opposed to, say, primary commodities such as oil and timber, arose largely in the second half of the twentieth century as trade between countries intensified. The lowering of transport costs and the relative fall in trade barriers enabled firms in one country to compete with a domestic rival in another. The supply of manufactured goods across the globe as a result of worldwide demand, principally from the affluent economies, thus heightened competitio
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2.2 What is a team?

Activity 1

Write your own definition of a 'team' (in 20 words or less).

You probably described a team as a group of some kind. However, a team is more than just a group. As noted above, wh
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1 course outline

The focus of this course is on relating to groups of other people rather than one-to-one relationships. Reading 1 develops some general concepts about 'groups' and 'teams', not just those at work. The later readings look at groups from particular perspectives or contexts, with the aim of discovering ideas about how to make them function more effectively.

This is, in fact, the main aim of this course: to help you understand how you might function more effectively in a group by improving
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3.5 Napoleon Visiting the Field of the Battle of Eylau

Napoleonic propaganda painting was very tightly controlled. In 1806, for example, the list of subjects was devised by Denon in consultation with Napoleon. The exact moment to be depicted was specified in several cases; as the above examples indicate, this could be crucial in ensuring that any too overt representation of violence was avoided. Artists were simply allocated the subject that they were to paint, and were also required to submit sketches of their proposed compositions to Denon for
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Learning to learn: Exploring learning
In this free course, Learning to learn: Exploring learning, we encourage you to consider two additional perspectives that can illuminate your learning. The first is the perspective that other people you know can provide; the second is the perspective that can be provided by academic theories about learning. We think that these two perspectives can help you prepare for personal change. PLEASE NOTE: this course is currently being reviewed. An updated and improved version of the course can be found
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Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2

1.2.3 Stage 1: Preparation

Numbers and diagrams are highly abstract and condensed summaries of the world. They require a degree of mental effort to bridge the gap between them and the aspects of the ‘real’ world they stand for. Approach them slowly and with care, allowing yourself time to get the feel of what you are looking at. Don't assume you already know what you are looking at.


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