Pages 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196 197 198 199 200 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 226 227 228 229 230 231 232 233 234 235 236 237 238 239 240 241 242 243 244 245 246 247 248 249 250 251 252 253 254 255 256 257 258 259 260 261 262 263 264 265 266 267 268 269 270 271 272 273 274 275 276 277 278 279 280 281 282 283 284 285 286 287 288 289 290 291 292 293 294 295 296 297 298 299 300 301 302 303 304 305 306 307 308 309 310 311 312 313 314 315 316 317 318 319 320 321 322 323 324 325 326 327 328 329 330 331 332 333 334 335 336 337 338 339 340 341 342 343 344 345 346 347 348 349 350 351 352 353 354 355 356 357 358 359 360 361 362 363 364 365 366 367 368 369 370 371 372 373 374 375 376 377 378 379 380 381 382 383 384 385 386 387 388 389 390 391 392 393 394 395 396 397 398 399 400 401 402 403 404 405 406 407 408 409 410 411 412 413 414 415 416 417 418 419 420 421 422 423 424 425 426 427 428 429 430 431 432 433 434 435 436 437 438 439 440 441 442 443 444 445 446 447 448 449 450 451 452 453 454 455 456 457 458 459 460 461 462 463 464 465 466 467 468 469 470 471 472 473 474 475 476 477 478 479 480 481 482 483 484 485 486 487 488 489 490 491 492 9827 result(s) returned

6.2 Catalytic mechanisms

In general terms, the following mechanisms operate at the active site of an enzyme to bring about the conversion of substrate to product:

  1. Charged groups at the enzyme active site alter the distribution of electrons in the substrate. By affecting the electron distributions in key atoms in the substrate, the enzyme can destabilise existing bonds and favour the formation of new bonds. This principle is illustrated below, using as an example the hydrolysis
    Author(s): The Open University

    License information
    Related content

    Except for third party materials and/or otherwise stated (see terms and conditions) the content in OpenLearn is released for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share

6.1 Introduction

Among those proteins of known function, the majority are enzymes. Enzymes act as catalysts, i.e. they increase the rates of reactions, making and breaking bonds, without themselves undergoing any permanent change. They are highly specific for particular reactions and are excellent examples of how a protein's function is entirely dependent on its structure.

First of all, a protein must bind its substrate (or substrates) in a specific fashion; it must then convert the substrate(s) into th
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and/or otherwise stated (see terms and conditions) the content in OpenLearn is released for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share

5.5 Summary of Section 5

  1. Proteins are dynamic molecular machines. All proteins bind to other molecules, whether ions, small molecules or macromolecules, and these interactions are critical to the protein's function. The activity of proteins is regulated by changes in conformation.

  2. In allosterically regulated proteins, binding of one ligand affects the conformation of a remote part of the protein, thereby regulating interaction with a second ligand. Cooperative binding
    Author(s): The Open University

    License information
    Related content

    Except for third party materials and/or otherwise stated (see terms and conditions) the content in OpenLearn is released for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share

5.3.3 Phosphorylation of proteins as a means of regulating activity

Phosphorylation is an important mechanism for regulating the activity of many proteins, either switching on or switching off some activity of the protein.

  • What protein that we have already discussed is both positively and negatively regulated by phosphorylation?

  • Src kinase activity is switched on by dephosphorylation of
    Author(s): The Open University

    License information
    Related content

    Except for third party materials and/or otherwise stated (see terms and conditions) the content in OpenLearn is released for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share

5.3.2 Cooperative binding

A feature of some proteins comprising more than one subunit is that binding of a ligand to its binding site on one subunit, can increase the affinity of a neighbouring subunit for the same ligand, and hence enhance binding. The ligand-binding event on the first subunit is communicated, via conformational change, to the neighbouring subunit. This type of allosteric regulation is called cooperative binding.

Haemoglobin, as we have already discussed, is a tetramer consisting of two
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and/or otherwise stated (see terms and conditions) the content in OpenLearn is released for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share

5.3.1 Allosteric regulation

In many proteins, the binding of a particular ligand at one site affects the conformation of a second remote binding site for another ligand on the same protein. This effect is called allosteric regulation and it is an important mechanism by which a protein's binding capacity and/or its activity are regulated. Thus the switch between two different protein conformations can be controlled by binding of a regulatory ligand.

Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and/or otherwise stated (see terms and conditions) the content in OpenLearn is released for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share

5.2 All proteins bind other molecules

All proteins bind to other molecules (generically termed ligands). Ligands that can bind to proteins include:

  • ions, e.g. Ca2+;

  • small molecules, e.g. H2O, O2 and CO2, glucose, ATP, GTP, NAD;

  • macromolecules, i.e. proteins, lipids, polysaccharides, nucleic acids.

These interactions are specific and key to the protein's function and, of course, are critically d
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and/or otherwise stated (see terms and conditions) the content in OpenLearn is released for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share

4.3 Conserved protein domains

By comparing the extensive protein databases, it is possible to identify many thousands of conserved domains. For example, within eukaryotes, over 600 domains have been identified with functions related to nuclear, extracellular and signalling proteins. The majority of conserved domains are evolutionarily ancient, with less than 10% being unique to vertebrates.

Author(s): The Open University

4.2 Amino acid sequence homologies and why they occur

Consider two genes encoding proteins that have 50% of their amino acid sequence in common.

  • How can this sequence homology be explained in terms of evolution?

  • The most parsimonious explanation is that the similarities result from the fact that the two organisms share a common evolutionary past and that the genes encoding
    Author(s): The Open University

    License information
    Related content

    Except for third party materials and/or otherwise stated (see terms and conditions) the content in OpenLearn is released for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share

1.6 Fibrous proteins

Most of the proteins described so far have been globular proteins. There are, however, some distinctive features that characterise fibrous proteins and we present here a general overview of these. Elongated fibrous proteins frequently play a structural role in the cell. They do not readily crystallise but tend to aggregate along their long axis to form fibres. X-ray diffraction studies of these fibres, in contrast to analysis of protein crystals, provides only very limited information on the
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and/or otherwise stated (see terms and conditions) the content in OpenLearn is released for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share

8.7 Luminosity functions

Samples of galaxies can be biased due to the flux limit of the sample that is observed. This is the so called Malmquist bias.

Activity 9: Radio-quiet quasars

0 hours 20 minutes

Read Pe
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and/or otherwise stated (see terms and conditions) the content in OpenLearn is released for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share

7.9 Compton scattering

Electromagnetic radiation interacts strongly with electrons. If a photon encounters an electron, there is a high probability that a scattering interaction will occur. In the low-energy non-relativistic regime, i.e. where h Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and/or otherwise stated (see terms and conditions) the content in OpenLearn is released for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share

7.4 Faraday depolarization

Radiation of wavelength λ which starts off linearly polarized in a particular direction and travels through a plasma has its direction of polarization rotated by an angle

where ne is the electron density, B| | is the component of the m
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and/or otherwise stated (see terms and conditions) the content in OpenLearn is released for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share

Learning outcomes

After studying this unit you will know more about:

  • the way that prion molecules cause diseases such as BSE and vCJD, and how the key discoveries about prions were made;

  • the patterns of BSE and vCJD in populations, and how this information is used to predict the number of cases there may be in future (and to assess the accuracy and precision of such predictions);

  • how science can make important contributions to managing episodes such as BSE/vCJD, and
    Author(s): The Open University

    License information
    Related content

    Except for third party materials and/or otherwise stated (see terms and conditions) the content in OpenLearn is released for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share

3 Reproduction in marsupials

The study of mammals requires you to deal with measurements, which we call numerical ‘data’, and you will get practice with compiling and analysing data if you work through all the units in this series. We assume only that you can add, subtract, multiply and divide. In this section, we ask you to use units
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and/or otherwise stated (see terms and conditions) the content in OpenLearn is released for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share

1.5.2 Instantaneous acceleration

The procedure of Question 15 for determining the instantaneous velocity of the car can be carried out for a whole set of different times and the resulting values of vx can be plotted against t to form a graph. This has been done in Figure 28, which shows how the velocity varies with time. At time t = 0 s, the car has zero velocity because it starts from rest. At later times, the velocity is positive because the car moves in the direction of in
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and/or otherwise stated (see terms and conditions) the content in OpenLearn is released for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share

1.4.5 Velocity–time and speed–time graphs

Just as we may plot the position–time graph or the displacement–time graph of a particular motion, so we may plot a velocity–time graph for that motion. By convention, velocity is plotted on the vertical axis (since velocity is the dependent variable) and time (the independent variable) is plotted on the horizontal axis. In the special case of uniform motion, the velocity–time graph takes a particularly simple form – it is just a horizontal line, i.e. the gradient is zero. Ex
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and/or otherwise stated (see terms and conditions) the content in OpenLearn is released for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share

1.1 The description of motion

The concepts that have been developed to allow the description of motion – concepts such as speed, velocity and acceleration – are now so much a part of everyday language that we rarely think about them. Just consider the number of times each day you have to describe some aspect of motion or understand an instruction about motion; obey a speed limit or work out a journey time. We may take the description of motion for granted, but the concepts involved are so fundamen
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and/or otherwise stated (see terms and conditions) the content in OpenLearn is released for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share

Acknowledgements

Video Materials

This extract is taken from S809 © 2005 The Open University.

All written material contained within this unit originated at the Open University.


Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and/or otherwise stated (see terms and conditions) the content in OpenLearn is released for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share

2.6 How can we find out more about Europa?

There are currently no scheduled missions to Jupiter's moons, since NASA's Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) was cancelled in 2005, but Europa remains a high priority target for both NASA and ESA, so a mission with simlar objectives to JIMO seems likely by about 2020. On arrival at Jupiter, JIMO would have gone into orbit first round Callisto, then Ganymede and finally Europa.

The main objectives of JIMO at Europa would have been to:

  1. Determine the
    Author(s): The Open University

    License information
    Related content

    Except for third party materials and/or otherwise stated (see terms and conditions) the content in OpenLearn is released for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share

Pages 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196 197 198 199 200 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 226 227 228 229 230 231 232 233 234 235 236 237 238 239 240 241 242 243 244 245 246 247 248 249 250 251 252 253 254 255 256 257 258 259 260 261 262 263 264 265 266 267 268 269 270 271 272 273 274 275 276 277 278 279 280 281 282 283 284 285 286 287 288 289 290 291 292 293 294 295 296 297 298 299 300 301 302 303 304 305 306 307 308 309 310 311 312 313 314 315 316 317 318 319 320 321 322 323 324 325 326 327 328 329 330 331 332 333 334 335 336 337 338 339 340 341 342 343 344 345 346 347 348 349 350 351 352 353 354 355 356 357 358 359 360 361 362 363 364 365 366 367 368 369 370 371 372 373 374 375 376 377 378 379 380 381 382 383 384 385 386 387 388 389 390 391 392 393 394 395 396 397 398 399 400 401 402 403 404 405 406 407 408 409 410 411 412 413 414 415 416 417 418 419 420 421 422 423 424 425 426 427 428 429 430 431 432 433 434 435 436 437 438 439 440 441 442 443 444 445 446 447 448 449 450 451 452 453 454 455 456 457 458 459 460 461 462 463 464 465 466 467 468 469 470 471 472 473 474 475 476 477 478 479 480 481 482 483 484 485 486 487 488 489 490 491 492