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1.7 Interlude

Now that we have covered the features found in igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic rocks, and seen how these features can be explained by the processes that formed the rocks, here is a useful point at which to have a break before continuing with the next section. Before returning, you might like to see for yourself what types of rock you can find in your area. Can you identify their texture, or spot any fossils? Surfaces that haven't been obscured by grime or lichens are by far the best, as
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Introduction

This unit is an adapted extract from the course Practising science (SXR103)

This unit introduces you to the types of activities undertaken by students of the earth sciences and ecology. You will learn how data is collected and analysed.


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2.1.1 Prisms and the refraction of light

The simplest way to disperse light is to use a prism. When light enters a prism, it is no longer travelling in a vacuum, and its speed decreases. If the incident wavefront is travelling at an angle to the surface of the prism, which is easy to arrange because of its angled faces, then the propagation of the part of the wavefront in the prism is retarded, thus bending the wavefront and changing its direction of propagation through the prism (Author(s): The Open University

1.8 Primordial nucleosynthesis

Time: 100 s to 1000 s

Temperature: 109 K to 3 × 108 K

Energy: 300 keV to 100 keV

As the temperature continued to decrease, protons and neutrons were able to combine to make light nuclei. This marked the beginning of the period referred to as the era of primordial nucleosynthesis (which literally means ‘making nuclei’). The first such reaction to become energetically favoured was that of a single proton and neutron comb
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1.7 The hadron era

Time: 10−5 s to 100 s

Temperature: 3 × 1012 K to 109 K

Energy: 1 GeV to 300 keV

From the time that the temperature fell to about 3 × 1012 K, at about 10−5 s after the Big Bang, stable baryons (protons and neutrons) began to form from the up and down quarks that remained after the annihilation of matter and antimatter.

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1.6 The quark-lepton era (contd)

The next stage of the story is to look at how and when the original mixture of all types of quark and lepton that were present when the Universe was 10−11 s old, gave rise to the Universe today, which seems to be dominated by protons, neutrons and electrons.

Question 8

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Acknowledgements

The content acknowledged below is Proprietary (see terms and conditions) and is used under licence.

Unit Image

Calum Davidson

All other materials included in this unit are derived from content originated at the Open University.

1. Join the 200,000 students currently studying withAuthor(s): The Open University

Learning outcomes

After studying this unit, you should be able to:

  • demonstrate an understanding of problems associated with defining the Nature of Science;

  • write in an informed way about the purposes of compulsory science education;

  • be aware of the educational complications and implications associated with the phrase ‘the public understanding of science’;

  • show an ability to comment critically on curriculum proposals that aim to promote science citi
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Parliament and the law
How are rules made and who can influence this procedure? This unit will introduce you to the rule-making processes in of the UK Houses of Parliament in Westminster. You will examine how laws are enacted and how it is possible for unelected bodies and people to influence the content of such laws. First published on Wed, 15 Jun 2011 as Author(s): Creator not set

9.3 Linear notes

This is the most common form of note-taking. It involves writing in sequence the points you want to note. As with all note-taking, the aim is to pick out and record the most important points. Avoid simply writing out most or all of the text again.

Try to write your notes in your own words as this will help you understand what you have been reading about. Also add a reference to which page(s) of the text your notes refer so you can easily find your way back to the relevant part of the te
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3.3.6 The House of Lords

The House of Commons and the House of Lords must finally agree on the text of a Bill. If a Bill started life in the House of Commons it is now passed to the House of Lords where it goes through all the stages outlined above. "If the House of Lords votes against a Bill it can go back to the House of Commons and become law if the House of Commons passes it for the second time. The reason for this is that the House of Lords is not an elected body and its function is to refine and add to law rath
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3.1 Types of Bill

Figure 7
Figure 7 The Houses of Parliament.

An Act of Parliament starts off as a Bill. A Bill is a proposal for a new piece of legislation that
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15 Appendix: multiplication tables

If you want to be able to do division without using a calculator, you need to know by heart what you get if you multiply any two numbers up to 10. All the possible combinations can be shown in a multiplication table (also called a times table), like the one below.

Figure 37
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1 The importance of evidence

The gathering, presentation and assessment of evidence are crucial and indeed inescapable parts of the practice of social science, hence the crucial role of evidence in the circuit of knowledge (see Figure 1).

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Copyright © 2013 The Open University

7.4 Elixirs of the nervous system: neurotrophins

According to Section 7.2 axons obtain an elixir from targets at their synapses.

Confirmation that there is indeed an elixir came from a series of events that reveals how much of science really works. Elmer Bucker, working with Hamburger in the mid-1940s, had removed a limb bud from a chick and replaced it with a tumour from
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Copyright © 2016 The Open University

Drawn from Courtly India: The Conley Harris and Howard Truelove Collection
December 6, 2015 - March 27, 2016: This exhibition presents masterful drawings from the royal courts of northern India. Lovingly amassed by artist Conley Harris and architectural designer Howard Truelove, the collection features practice sketches, preparatory drawings, subtly modeled scenes, and lightly colored compositions created between the 1500s and 1800s. With images at different stages of completion, the collection allows for a fascinating look at Indian workshop practice. Alth
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Student killed in clashes with police in Egypt
A student is reportedly killed in clashes between university student protesters and police in Cairo. Rough Cut (no reporter narration). Subscribe: http://smarturl.it/reuterssubscribe More Breaking News: http://smarturl.it/BreakingNews Reuters tells the world's stories like no one else. As the largest international multimedia news provider, Reuters provides coverage around the globe and across topics including business, financial, national, and international news. For over 160 years, Reuters ha
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Pratiques innovantes en enseignement - apprentissage, l'exemple d'Innovalangues (Vidéo)

Monica Masperi

Maître de Conférences (Université Grenoble Alpes)

Pratiques innovantes en enseignement - apprentissage, l'exemple d'Innovalangues


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Darwin Now Awards
Janice Ansine is a recipient of a Darwin Now Award. She is currently working on a variety of projects in Jamaica, looking at contemporary responses to Darwin and Into the historic role of Jamaica in providing material for his research.
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Spanish Review Course
The ALTEC Spanish Refresher is a self-paced non-credit online Spanish review course. The course used to be teacher-led but was transformed into a free self-paced course in 2014.  The course reviews important aspects of the curriculum of the first two years of college Spanish while giving students a head start on third year courses. Every week deals with a new cultural topic and provides students with opportunities to engage in a variety of speaking, writing, reading and listening activ
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