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2.3 Hibernators as eutherms

Hibernating endotherms are not the easiest animals to study. Thus, until the late 1960s many biologists believed that mammalian hibernation was a process in which thermoregulation was simply ‘switched off’, following the receipt of a set of ‘cues’. These cues included a declining T a, a shortening daylength, the extent of body fat and a lack of food etc. With this model, the hibernator essentially becomes an ectotherm whose T b follows the T
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2.2 Species showing torpor or deep hibernation

Among the birds, torpor occurs in a number of species in the orders Apodiformes (hummingbirds and swifts), Caprimulgiformes (nightjars, nighthawks, goatsuckers and poor wills) and Coliiformes (mousebirds). In all of the hummingbirds (family Trochilidae) studied to date, torpor, if it occurs, takes place on a daily (or more usually nightly) basis. They are able to re-warm themselves independently of T a and show an increased thermogenesis if T a falls below
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2.1 Degrees of torpor

Adaptive hypothermia occurs in at least six distantly related mammalian orders (Table 1) and in several orders of birds. There is a spectrum running from those species which can tolerate a drop in T b by 2° C for a few hours, to the seasonal deep hibernators which maintain a T b as low as 4° C for weeks on end.

Table 1 Groups o
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5.4.1 Summary of Section 5

Several anatomical and biochemical adaptations to living in very cold water have evolved in polar fish, particularly those of the southern oceans, which have evolved in isolation for many millions of years. Cold, turbulent water is rich in oxygen. One family of fairly large fish lacks blood pigments but its blood is less viscous and it has additional respiratory surfaces. Many fish have cryoprotectants in the blood and other body fluids, and the muscles of some contain numerous mitochondria a
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5.4 Fatty acids as indicators of diet

Although polar fish and invertebrates are difficult to study alive for the reasons just described, some information about their diet and habits can be obtained from analysis of the lipid composition of their tissues. At high latitudes, the supply of most kinds of marine food changes with the seasons, just as it does on land, and many fish eat little or nothing for long periods, living off their reserves of triacylglycerols. Lipids are major fuels for polar fish and, although many fish have li
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4.3 Humans in polar regions

Humans evolved in tropical Africa and gradually colonized colder climates during the Pleistocene ice ages. There have been permanent populations in the Arctic for several thousand years, mostly Inuit (Eskimos) in what are now Canada, Alaska and Greenland, and several groups in northern Europe and Russia, such as the Saami (Lapp) in Scandinavia and the Chukchi in Siberia. Such people do not grow crops and keep only a few domestic animals, mostly for transport (e.g. husky dogs or reindeer), not
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3.5 The structure of adipose tissue

Since food is only available seasonally or intermittently at high latitudes, many arctic birds and mammals, including polar bears, Svalbard reindeer, arctic foxes, seals and walruses, naturally accumulate large stores of fat. The quantity of energy stored and the metabolic control of its use are finely adjusted to the habits and habitat of the species. This section is concerned with the cellular structure and anatomical organization of adipose tissue in such naturally obese species. Most labo
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3.3.1 Dormancy in black and brown bears

The dormant state of bears differs from true hibernation in that the body temperature does not fall below 31–35° C and a major disturbance (such as an intruding biologist) can arouse them to full activity in a few minutes. Dormant bears do not eat, drink, urinate or defaecate, the heart rate drops from 50–60 beats min−1 to 8–12 beats min−1, and oxygen consumption is only 32% of that of actively foraging bears. Nonetheless, the rate of protein turnover, as mea
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3.1 Introduction

It is clear from Sections 1 and 2 that seasonal or irregular periods of fasting are an integral part of living at high latitudes, especially for large animals. When people (and many tropical and temperate-zone mammals) lose weight, either because they are eating less or because they are suffering from a digestive or metabolic disorder, protein is broken down in substantial quantities long before the lipid stores are exhausted. Even frequent and vigorous exercise cannot prevent the breakdown o
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2.4.1 Summary of Sections 1 and 2

Large seasonal changes in temperature and sunlight dominate primary plant production and hence the food supply. Food intake is regulated by the endogenous seasonal control of appetite, fattening and activity, as well as by food availability. Energetically demanding activities such as breeding and migration are only feasible during a brief period and must be tightly synchronized to season. Greater accessibility of food suitable for chicks makes long-distance migration to and from high arctic r
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4.3.4 Removal of NO

Laboratory experiments have shown that, under the conditions in the catalytic converter, the decomposition of NO to O2 and N2 over noble metal catalysts is too slow to be significant. When the A/F ratio is stoichiometric (or below stoichiometry), NO can be removed by reduction with CO and/or hydrocarbons. For simplicity we shall consider only reduction with CO, as with the oxidation reaction, the situation with hydrocarbons is considerably more complicated.

In prin
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4.3 Exhaust emission characteristics

Before we consider how the three-way catalyst functions in any detail, it is important to understand how the emissions of CO, HC and NOx, from the engine depend on the ratio of air (A) to fuel (F) – the air/fuel ratio (or A/F ratio). The significance of this will become clear when we see that the ratio at which the three-way catalytic converter operates is crucial for its success.

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4.1 Exhaust pollutants

The most important chemical reaction in a petrol engine – that is, the one that provides the energy to drive the vehicle – is the combustion of fuel in air. In an ‘ideal’ system, combustion would be complete so that the only exhaust products would be carbon dioxide and steam. In practice, the complete oxidation of the fuel depends on a number of factors: first, there must be sufficient oxygen present; second, there must be adequate mixing of the petrol and air; and finally, there must
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References

Blakemore, C. and Cooper, A. (1970) Development of the brain depends on visual environment, Nature, 228, pp. 477–8.
Caspi, A., McClay, J., Moffitt, T. E., Mill, J., Martin, J., Craig, I. W., Taylor, A. and Poulton, R. (2002) Role of genotype in the cycle of violence in maltreated children, Science, 297, pp. 851–4.
Caspi, A., Sugden, K., Moffitt, T. E., Taylor
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End of unit questions

Question 1

Explain your reasons for agreeing or disagreeing with each of the following sentences.

(a) If a disease has a genetic basis and someone has the (abnormal) alleles for the disease, then that person will have the symptoms of the d
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10 Unit summary

The unit began by considering what factors contribute to individual differences. The case was made, with the spiders, and later with genetic diseases, that the genome was very important. Subsequent sections revealed that the external environment (e.g. maternal care, the presence of light) and the internal environment (e.g. hormones and drugs) were very important and that they can both shape and determine the development of the organism. Environmental factors, in the form of hormones and drugs
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9.4 Summary of Section 9

This section has illustrated what has to be done, by way of a long-term study, to yield meaningful information on the relationship between genes and development and the behaviour of the organism. It also illustrates the hugely complex nature of the relationship between genes and development and the behaviour of the organism. Yet this complexity is not the exception, it is the rule.


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9.2 Antisocial behaviour disease

The psychological arena is hugely complex because there are additional issues of responsibility and treatment. Briefly, society takes a more lenient attitude towards the behaviour of someone who is ill (diseased) compared to someone who is well. The diseased person is not fully responsible for their actions (‘They can't help it’). Therefore any individual with antisocial (aggressive) behaviour who is diagnosed as having a disease is largely absolved of blame. Having a disease, means, at l
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8.4 Fragile X syndrome

Fragile X syndrome is the final example of a genetic disease considered here.

Activity 21

What does the term ‘genetic disease’ mean?

Answer

Genetic disea
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8.3 Lissencephaly

Lissencephaly, literally meaning ‘smooth brain’, is characterised by the absence of sulci and gyri, and by a four-layered cortex, instead of the usual six layers, with the majority of cortical neurons in layer four (Figure 22). Babies born with lissencephaly have a very poor prognosis; the disease proving lethal be
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