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References

Berry, W. L., Hill, T. and Klompmaker, J. E. (1999) ‘Aligning marketing and manufacturing strategies with the market’, International Journal of Production Research, Vol. 37, No. 16, pp. 3599–618.
The Chartered Institute of Marketing, Marketing Glossary, accessed 9 July 2008.

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8.3.6 Deep silicon etching

MEMS structures often require etching to a much greater depth than is needed for microelectronics. A rate of 1–2 μm min−1 may be quite sufficient for making transistors less than 1 mm deep, but to etch through 600 mm of silicon to form an accelerometer would take all day. The advent of MEMS and wafer-level packaging applications, therefore, brought a need for yet faster anisotropic etches, requiring advances both in the process and in the etching equipment.

Capacitive co
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7.4.3 Chemical vapour deposition (CVD)

If step coverage or equipment cost is more critical than purity, then PVD is supplanted by CVD.

There are many variants on the chemical vapour deposition technique, but the concept is simple: gases adsorb onto the wafer surface where a chemical reaction forms a solid product. Any other products are gases, or at least volatile liquids, and are pumped away.

There is one obvious restriction: the wafer surface must be the only place where the reaction can occur. If it is not, particle
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7.4 Depositing compounds

As well as conducting metal layers, device fabrication requires dielectric, insulating materials and these are mostly chemical compounds rather than simple elements or alloys. By far the most widely used of these is silicon oxide (either as a glass or as crystalline quartz), but other oxides and nitrides are also common, plus polymers and a selection of more exotic materials.

Such compounds generally have very high melting points, or decompose under heating, so cannot be deposited by ev
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7.3.3 Plasmas

More control can be achieved in vapour deposition if a plasma is generated. A plasma is simply a gas where a proportion of the molecules have been ionised. The ions remain in an uneasy equilibrium with the electrons they have released, prevented from recombining only because the electrons are hot and fast-moving, and so are difficult to trap.

Plasmas are widely used in materials processing, with pressure ranging from 10−3 mbar to 1 mbar and typically up to 1% of the molecul
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3.1.5 Digital media for medical X-rays

Digital cameras have revolutionised the family album. However, the initial driver for CCD imagers in particular was specialised applications such as the capture of high-quality astronomical images, especially on remote satellites and space probes, from where it is unfeasible to collect film and from where continuous, real-time, high-bandwidth data streams are impractical. The CCD camera system, with its combination of high-sensitivity image capture, high-fidelity read-out and long-term storag
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4.8 Assess and review again

If you've been following the stages of our problem-solving map, then the chances are you're ahead of me here (Figure 19). Yes, if it works, hurrah; if it doesn't then off we go again, all the way back to ‘possible solutions’ and selecting the best of the rest. Or maybe even going back to the be
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4.7 Build prototype/demonstrator

The physical models we talked about earlier are prototypes or demonstrators of a sort. However, for the purposes of making a clear distinction in the process, I'm referring here to prototypes or demonstrators as functioning preliminary models of the essential finished product or construction or service, bringing together all the elements of the design that may or may not have been previously physically tested (Author(s): The Open University

5.1 Overview

The enquiry team set up by the Board of Trade, and sitting in Dundee Court House, held an initial session lasting several days starting on Saturday 3 January 1880. There were three members chaired by Mr Rothery, Commissioner of Wrecks. The others were Colonel Yolland, the Inspector of Railways, and Mr W H Barlow, president of the Institute of Civil Engineers, and a distinguished practising civil engineer.

Henry Rothery was a mathematics graduate but trained as a barrister. He had been a
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1.1 Overview

Why are disasters important? They attract public attention because there is great loss of life, or because the event happened suddenly and quite unexpectedly, or because the accident occurred to a new project that had been regarded as completely safe. Certainly, the aspect of suddenness is one that features in many catastrophes, and indeed, it is this feature by which a catastrophe is defined.

Great disasters are always traumatic, especially for those who endure them and come through al
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5.7 Vibrating air column: reflection at the end of an air column

When a sound wave reaches the end of an air column, it is clear that it will be reflected if the tube end is closed. You only have to imagine yourself standing some distance, let's say 50 metres, away from a flat wall. If you shout, you will hear an echo – the reflection of the sound wave you projected.

There is one difference, though, between the reflection of a sound wave and the reflection of the wave on a string that you met previously. When a sound wave is reflected from a closed
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5.5 Vibrating string: pitches of notes produced by stringed instruments

When a string is bowed, plucked or struck, energy is supplied that starts the string vibrating. The string doesn't just vibrate in one single mode; instead, it vibrates in a combination of several modes simultaneously. The displacement along the string is the superposition of the standing-wave patterns corresponding to those modes. For example, if the string vibrated only in the first and second modes, the displacement at a given instant of time might appear as shown in Author(s): The Open University

5.2 Vibrating string: speed of wave propagation

If standing waves are set up when two travelling waves moving in opposite directions interact, then how are standing waves set up on a string and why are they set up only at certain frequencies?

To help answer these questions, I want you first to imagine a length of string that is fixed at one end and held in someone's hand at the other. Suppose the person holding the string flicks their end of the string in such a way that an upward pulse is sent along the string.

As the pulse pa
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6.3 Root-mean-square amplitude

One drawback of the amplitude as I have defined it is that although it allows the relative sizes of sine waves to be compared, it does not give a good idea of what a sine wave can deliver in absolute terms. For instance, a sine wave with an amplitude of 10 volts has twice the amplitude of one with an amplitude of 5 volts. But is a power source that delivers a sine wave with an amplitude of 10 volts as powerful as, say, a 10 volt battery? Could you use it to drive a bulb and get the same illum
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4.2 Frequency, wavelength and the speed of sound

The speed of sound has a joint relationship with both the wavelength and the frequency of the sound. To see why, recall that at the end of Section 2.5, in connection with the wave produced by a tuning fork, I said ‘in the time it has taken for the source to go through one cycle of oscillation, the wave h
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2.7 Summary

Pressure in the air is related to how closely packed the molecules are. Other things being equal, more closely packed molecules are at a higher pressure than more dispersed molecules. Sound is associated with fluctuations of the air pressure caused by local disturbance. Fluctuations of pressure travel outwards away from the disturbance, carrying energy imparted by the disturbance.

A simple form of local disturbance to air pressure is a vibrating tuning fork. It generates a pressure wave
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5.9 Developing other systems methods

There are many more methods that are regarded as systems approaches for managing complexity (e.g. Rosenhead, 1989a; Flood and Carson, 1988; Flood and Jackson, 1991; Mingers and Gill, 1997; Francois, 1997; Flood, 1999; Jackson, 2000). The systems practitioners responsible for developing these come from a varied background, but in the main their experiences are similar to those described for Checkland, Beer, Espejo and the T301 team. All wanted to be able either to take action that stakeholders
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5.5 Experiences that motivated the development of systems methods

I have already introduced various systems methods. Behind all of these methods, there has generally been a champion, a promoter aided by countless co-workers, students, etc. To paraphrase the French sociologist of technology, Bruno Latour: we are never confronted with a systems method, but with a gamut of weaker and stronger associations; thus understanding what a method is, is the same task as understanding who the people are.

A method, like any social technology, depends on many peopl
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5.3 Purposeful and purposive behaviour

It is possible, as observers, to ascribe a purpose to what we or others do, the actions we take. How particular actions, or activities are construed will differ from observer to observer because of their different perspectives, which arise from their traditions of understanding. For example, in Author(s): The Open University

4.2 Articulating your appreciation of complexity

Initially, I would like you to notice whether and how your appreciation of the phrase ‘managing complexity’ has changed since you started the unit. As you work through Section 4 you will encounter a number of ways of thinking about complexity that may be new to you, so it becomes important to record your developing understanding. To help you with this, return to your notes on Author(s): The Open University

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