3.6 Stage 5: Understanding and learning the course material

Simply reading and re-reading the course materials will take you more time than you can afford, and is not an effective way of learning material for an exam. Adopt what is called an active approach to learning for your exam. Different subjects demand different active methods but, generally speaking, this approach involves you in manipulating or doing things with the material in a way that helps it to stick, so you can recall it later.

The first thing you need to do is to reduce t
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8.6 Research skills

This kind of work teaches some very valuable skills:

  • how to set about an enquiry

  • how and where to find source material and information

  • how to make your own investigations

  • strategic planning

  • time management

  • cutting corners and being pragmatic

  • analysing and interpreting primary and secondary source material

  • forming your own conclusions<
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4.8.3 Mode

The mode, or modal value, is the most popular value in a set of numbers, the one that occurs most often. However, it is not always possible to give the mode as some sets of values do not have a single value that occurs more than each of the others. Like the median, the mode can help us to get a better feel for the set of values. Retailers find the mode useful when they want to know which item to restock first.

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1.2.3 Stage 1: Preparation

Numbers and diagrams are highly abstract and condensed summaries of the world. They require a degree of mental effort to bridge the gap between them and the aspects of the ‘real’ world they stand for. Approach them slowly and with care, allowing yourself time to get the feel of what you are looking at. Don't assume you already know what you are looking at.


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1.2.2 Stages in reading numbers and diagrams

Having established roughly what we are looking at when we see a table of numbers or a diagram, how do we read it systematically? It may be best to think of this as a process with several stages.


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1 The importance of evidence

The gathering, presentation and assessment of evidence are crucial and indeed inescapable parts of the practice of social science, hence the crucial role of evidence in the circuit of knowledge (see Figure 1).

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7.3 Internalizing and interrogating key ideas

In addition to revisiting your notes at different times throughout the year, you might also look for opportunities to discuss key ideas with someone else - either a fellow student or someone outside of The Open University who is interested in contemporary social science debates. This can provide a helpful stimulus to internalizing them. Debating issues with someone else may well help you to generate further questions and critical observations, all part of processing and interrogating m
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4 Taking the point: identifying key ideas

As earlier activities have demonstrated, active reading and note taking often come hand-in-hand. In order to read effectively we often have to jot down the main ideas and key words introduced in the text. We might also note down one or two questions as we go along to assist in the ‘thinking’ part of the process. But, like reading, note taking comes in all shapes and sizes, and different kinds of notes can be useful for different purposes. Moreover, good note taking, like purposeful, activ
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Starting with psychology
The most 'important and greatest puzzle' we face as humans is ourselves (Boring, 1950, p. 56). Humans are a puzzle, one that is complex, subtle and multi-layered, and it gets even more complicated as we evolve over time and change within different contexts. When answering the question 'what makes us who we are?' psychologists put forward a range of explanations about why people feel, think and behave the way they do. Just when psychologists seem to understand one bit of 'who we are' up pops some
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Acknowledgements

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see terms and conditions), this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence

Grateful acknowledgement is made to the following sources for permission to reproduce materia
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Conclusion

This free course provided an introduction to studying Education, Childhood & Youth. It took you through a series of exercises designed to develop your approach to study and learning at a distance, and helped to improve your confidence as an independent learner.


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Introduction

This unit draws attention to the value of a sociocultural understanding of spoken language in the processes of teaching and learning. It focuses upon how language can be used for persuasion, control and argument, and how dialogue can act as an aid to development. Along with some background reading and activities this unit offers opportunities for the evaluation of some selected classroom talk.

This material is from our archive and is an adapted extract from Language and literacy in a
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2.1 Escritorio

En esta sesión vas a trabajar los textos descriptivos y para ello aprenderás a describir un lugar usando recursos expresivos como las comparaciones o analogías y metáforas.

Actividad 6

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4.2 Actividad

Actividad 4.2

Patricio, the architect from Chile, is working in Valencia. He has a busy schedule.

1 Read the following e-mail message with his diary, as sent to his secretary. Put the different places listed into the
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3.1 Listening to and taking notes from a telephone call

In this section you practise obtaining information on the phone. You describe a relocation site as part of the more detailed research into the advantages of possible locations.

In the next activity you listen to a telephone call between Steve Vance who works for the Reloc agency and an employee of the Commission for New Towns (CNT), an agency whose task is to promote the development of a number of new towns and provide information for companies that wish to relocate.

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2.1 Making a shortlist of locations

Once a company has decided to relocate it needs to research possible locations.

This section considers locations in terms of size, facilities, communications, population and amenities. You will collect information and work on descriptions, summaries and question forms.

The first step in the relocation process is to make a shortlist of locations that match the organisation's needs. This means considering the advantages and disadvantages of each site. Masito Electronics is consideri
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The science of nutrition and healthy eating
This free course, The science of nutrition and healthy eating, looks at the science behind nutrition, covering aspects of biology, chemistry and physics as well as giving some insight into healthier eating. Reading food labels, choosing healthier foods, hydrating appropriately and understanding how we taste food will allow you to be more informed about the choices you make about the food you eat. Author(s): Creator not set

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4.6 Gender and power in the workplace

Activity 16

0 hours 20 minutes

If you are, or have been, employed in a health and social care service, think about the ways in which gendered power ‘works’ in
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3.3 Care: a contested word

You have seen that the words used to label people who are seen as needing care can stigmatise them. By picking them out as unlike ‘normal’ people, people who do not need care, they can feel belittled, de-humanised and deprived of respect. But it is not just the labels like ‘mentally handicapped’, ‘lunatic’ or ‘mentally ill’ that are at issue. ‘Care’ as a word is itself under attack:

The t
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2.4.3 abelling

The term ‘informal carer’ is a label. It was coined to describe people who take on unpaid responsibility for the welfare of another person. It is a term which has meaning only when the public world of care provision comes into contact with the private world of the family where caring is a day-to-day, unremarked-upon activity, like reminding a young child to clean her teeth. Labelling yourself as an informal carer requires a major shift in the way you see yourself, a shift neither Arthur n
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