Genghis Khan: A Ruthless Legacy
Genghis Khan founded the Mongol Empire and raided most of Eurasia. He developed the most advanced professional army ever seen in Asia. He was known as "the Great Khan." Genghis Khan died in 1227 soon after the submission of the Xi Xia. The exact reason is uncertain. In this video clip, learn more about the legacy Kahn left in history. (4:01)
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Neil deGrasse Tyson on Finding Krypton
During a roundtable discussion with journalists, Hayden Planetarium Director Neil deGrasse Tyson explains how he helped Superman find his home planet of Krypton. Tyson appears as a character in the recent DC Comics' ACTION COMICS #14, "Star Light, Star Bright." In real life, he consulted a star index and found a real star that supported the backstory of the comic. The red dwarf star designated for having the ability to support a Krypton-like planet is located in the constellation Corvus 27.1 l
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How to Draw a Water Drop  - Step-by-Step
Take a look at the video and learn from the producer of the video as he shows you step by step on how to draw a water drop.  (04:27)
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Lesson 08 - One Minute Romanian
In lesson 8 of One Minute Romanian you will learn to count from one to ten. Remember - even a few phrases of a language can help you make friends and enjoy travel more. Find out more about One Minute Romanian at our website - http://www.oneminutelanguages.com. One Minute Romanian is brought to you by the Radio Lingua Network and is ©Copyright 2008.Author(s): No creator set

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Panel 3: The Cost of Low Priced Energy

Recorded 11/16/12


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Fall 2012 Capstone Presentation - Group #1
On December 13th, students from the Fall Capstone class presented their projects. Taught this semester by Prof. Gavin Shatkin, the Capstone is a required course that all Master's students in the LPP and MURP programs take in their final semester. This semester's students worked with Street-Works and the City of Quincy on a plan for the redevelopment of the Quincy Center MBTA Station.
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Economic Update: "Inconvenient Economic Truths"
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4.1 The rate of evolution

I now want to move away from looking at the challenges facing all aquatic mammals, to examine very briefly what we know about the evolutionary history of the cetaceans. This group has travelled furthest from its terrestrial roots and made the fullest adaptation to life in the sea.

Since mammals evolved on land, it has long seemed reasonable to suggest that the origin of whales must have involved an evolutionary transition from the land to the water. But how can we explain the fact that
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2.1 Land versus water

Mammals share a number of biological characteristics that mark them out as members of the class Mammalia. Many of these are adaptations to a life on land. For example:

  • Mammals give birth to young at a relatively advanced stage of development and feed their young on milk.

  • Most mammals have hair, or fur, covering part or all of the body.

  • Mammals have a high metabolic rate and maintain a relatively high and constant body temp
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2.3.1 Try some yourself

1 Write the following as one number to a single power:

  • (a) 23 × 24

  • (b) 32 × 34

  • (c) 42 × 43 × 44<
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1.3 Square roots

Given any number, you now know how to find its square. But, given the squared number, how do you find the original number?

Example 3

1.1 Squares

In general, to square a number, multiply it by itself. This is denoted by writing a small ‘2’ to the top right of the number,

e.g. 4 squared, written 42, is 4 × 4 = 16.


Author(s): The Open University

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4 Open Mark quiz

Now try the quiz  and see if there are any areas you need to work on.


Author(s): The Open University

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Introduction

This unit introduces the topic of vectors. The subject is developed without assuming you have come across it before, but the unit assumes that you have previously had a basic grounding in algebra and trigonometry, and how to use Cartesian coordinates for specifying a point in a plane.

This is an adapted extract from the Open University course Mathematical methods and models (MST209)
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1.4.1 Bearings

In the following subsections, we apply the vector ideas introduced so far to displacements and velocities. The examples will feature directions referred to points of the compass, known as bearings.

The direction of Leeds relative to Bristol can be described as ‘15° to the East of due North’, or N 15° E. This is an instance of a bearing. Directions on the ground are typically given like this, in terms of the directions North (N), South (S), East (E)
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Introduction

This unit is aimed at teachers who wish to review how they go about the practice of teaching maths, those who are considering becoming maths teachers, or those who are studying maths courses and would like to understand more about the teaching process.

This unit is from our archive and is an adapted extract from Teaching mathematical thinking at Key Stage 3 (ME624) which is no longer taught by The Open University. If you want to study formally with us, you may wish to explore other cour
Author(s): The Open University

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1.4.8 Summary

In this section we have introduced you to the PROMPT checklist as a useful tool for assessing the quality of any piece of information. If you use it regularly you will find that you develop the ability to scan information quickly and identify strengths and weaknesses. As a closing exercise you might like to pick one of the websites below or any of your own choice and try to evaluate it using the PROMPT criteria. To make it easier for you we have provided a printable checklist (see below).


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4.2.1 Eco-efficiency = money in the bank

Business can profit from taking the environment into account (generally called eco-efficiency). Poor environmental performance is seen as a reflection of poor business practice in general. Eco-efficiency promotes the economic benefits of energy and materials savings, at the same time being first to market with new technologies or products. Since business sustainability lobbies promoted eco-efficiency in the early 1990s, the creed has gained rapid acceptance, and with good cause. There
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Acknowledgements

The material acknowledged below is Proprietary and used under licence, see terms and conditions). This content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence

Grateful acknowledgement is made to the following:

Figures

Figur
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References

Alley, R. B. (2000) The Two Mile Time Machine, Princeton, Princeton University Press.
Arnakak, J. (2000) ‘What is Inuit Qaujimajatuqangit?’, Nunatsiaq News, 25 August, p. 11.

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