2.4 The body's different components

Looking at the body this way means thinking about things as small as atoms and molecules, and as large as whole body parts. This allows us to think about how everything works at an appropriate level. If we want to understand breathing, for example, we need to think about tiny things such as the oxygen molecules that are absorbed in the body. Similarly, if we want to understand eating, we have to think of complicated internal structures such as the stomach. If we want to understand how the bod
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Introduction

This unit is from our archive and it is an adapted extract from The professional certificate in management (B615) which is no longer in presentation. If you wish to study formally at The Open University, you may wish to explore the courses we offer in this curriculum area.

In this session we look at the first stage of ma
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6 Conclusion

Here is a summary of the main learning points from this course:

  • The vast majority of people only become donors by being asked.

  • Acknowledging your own feelings about asking is an important step in becoming confident in this key skill.

  • A behavioural approach to asking concentrates on analysing and performing a sequence of activity: choosing the moment, setting the participants at ease, establishing mutuality, explanation, re
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References

Alley, R. B. (2000) The Two Mile Time Machine, Princeton, Princeton University Press.
Arnakak, J. (2000) ‘What is Inuit Qaujimajatuqangit?’, Nu
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2.2 The origins of a rights discourse

In some form, the ideas of ‘rights’ and ‘justice’ could probably be found in all societies and cultures. They are moral concepts because they are concerned with moral ideals; with how things should be rather than describing how things are. However, the notion of rights now has a prominence in political debate in a way it has not had in other times and places. In the political thought of the ancient world, for example, a key question was how individuals could best contrib
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5.1.1 How much trust can I put in this text?

You would generally assume that any set texts for a are trustworthy. But when you find a text through your own research you need to run a few checks to assess the soundness of its content.

Who is the publisher?

If an article is from an academic journal, you can assume that its quality has been vetted by the journal's editors. Also if a book is published by a major academic publishing house, you would expect it to be ‘respectable’. And if it's a book from an academic ser
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4.2 Naturalism and reductive explanation

There is a widespread commitment among contemporary philosophers and scientists to a naturalistic view of the world. In broad terms, naturalism is the view that everything is scientifically explicable – to put it crudely, that there are no miracles. (Note that I am using ‘naturalism’ here for a metaphysical position – a view about the nature of the world. It is also used for a methodological position – a view about how the world, or some aspect of it, should be
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1.2 Different perspectives on the creation of music

If a simple division into composition and improvisation is not going to be adequate, particularly when considering music beyond the Western art tradition, then what can we usefully say about the different ways in which music is created? A starting point might be to remind ourselves of the similarities between composition and improvisation. Both the improviser and the composer create music. Both of them, in doing so, draw on a range of skills and experience: their musical training and k
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2.5 Non-Linearity

A linear system can be defined in two ways: (1) one which obeys the principle of superposition, and (2) one possessing the frequency-preservation property.

If we consider an optical fibre with electromagnetic field as the input and output, then provided that the power level of the input signal is not too great (less than 1 mW, which is 0 dBm), the fibre may be well modelled by a linear system for most purposes.

When fibre is used for a single point-to-point link to convey a digita
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6 Conclusion

This unit has presented a series of themed video clips that demonstrate how the Plus organisation in Stirling, Scotland, has worked in a variety of ways with children and young people.

Activities in this unit have focused on communication, identity, play and risk. These have helped you explore and identify the various skills necessary to work effectively with children, young people and other practitioners.


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1.2.1 Positive and negative meanings

Many people spend a lot of time at home, they invest part of themselves within it, both materially and emotionally. So what does it mean?

Activity 1: What does home mean?

  1. The g
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3.2 Parts of the gamelan salendro

The next set of video sequences feature a type of Sundanese ensemble called gamelan salendro. You will need to know that this music is based on a pentatonic scale, also called salendro. The Sundanese use various methods to describe this scale, the simplest of which is a numerical system in which each note of the scale is assigned a number from 1 to 5. One aspect of the system which may take a bit of getting used to is that the Sundanese assign the numbers to a descending
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3.5 The language of law

A potential barrier to understanding, which those new to law can find off-putting, is the use of specialist terminology. This contributes to the perception of law as an elitist and difficult area of study and is something that requires further explanation. Many professions (and social groups) develop their own forms of language to communicate effectively and, in some cases, to signify group membership. In this sense legal language is not unique, but is does have a formal character which can s
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2.1 What makes a good project manager?

The performance of the project manager is crucial to the success of any project, since he or she is the person responsible for ensuring that it reaches a successful conclusion. Although criteria for project success are likely to be expressed in terms of meeting deadlines, budgets and standards, much of the project manager's work will involve achieving these benchmarks through people involved in the project. While the role of the project manager has traditionally been powerful in professions s
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1.4.8 Comment on case studies

Vic was not consulted about his needs and the possibility of his death was never discussed. The uncertainty about his religious needs resulted in a staff member having to make a decision on his behalf and hope that it was the right one. An added dimension to the uncertainty about Vic’s wishes was the relationship which he had with his sons, in which there was a lot of unresolved conflict.

Li did not have a choice about her place of death because she was unable to speak, but previously
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5 Legacy fundraising

Legacies are an extremely important source of income for many charities. In the UK they represent well over a quarter of the total income from individuals of the top 500 fundraising charities, with a particularly strong showing in healthcare and animal charities (Sargeant and Jay, 2004). Slightly fewer than half of adults in the UK have written wills, but more than one in ten of those who do, leave charitable bequests (Radcliffe, 2007). Figures like this suggest there is plenty of potential t
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1.2 Silences and concealment

Anthropologists and psychoanalysts use the term ‘taboo’ to describe forbidden activities, feelings or relationships. All societies seem to have particular rules and rituals to deal with bodily functions, sexuality and death, sometimes expressed in terms of hygiene or religion, and these keep them separated off from everyday life. When social rules function well they are invisible. We only notice them when we have committed a faux pas and caused embarrassment.

Marie very quick
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Introduction

This unit considers working with people in group care and residential settings. Social workers play a critical role in supporting service users in moves to and from residential care, and they should be capable of assessing needs and the quality of care provision. The activities in the unit focus on the lives of three people living in a nursing and residential home for elderly and disabled people. Although many of the practice examples relate to work with older people, the values and principle
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Baltimore curfew hits local businesses hard
Businesses in Fells Point, a Baltimore neighborhood brimming with bars and restaurants, say the city's new 10 p.m. curfew has hit cash registers hard. Nathan Frandino reports. Subscribe: http://smarturl.it/reuterssubscribe More updates and breaking news: http://smarturl.it/BreakingNews Reuters tells the world's stories like no one else. As the largest international multimedia news provider, Reuters provides coverage around the globe and across topics including business, financial, national, an
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