4.1 Introduction

I'll now look at what these components do in the communication system, using the mobile phone system as an example.


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7.3 Summary of Section 7

  • The historian Linda Colley locates the birth of ‘Britain’ after 1707. She mentions three main factors that contributed to establishing the British nation: war, religion and the prospect of material advantage.

  • The creation of the UK was not free from conflict, resistance, war and military intervention.

  • The British Empire generated a unique opportunity for most UK nations to participate and enjoy some of the benefits it brough
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Protecting architectural world heritage from earthquakes
Dr Dina D'Ayala discusses the fundamental concepts of earthquake engineering and recent research developments in the field of earthquake protection.
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Facilitating creative thinking
How do you solve your problems? This album follows two facilitators as they lead a 2-day workshop in creative problem-solving, providing a chance to adopt a new approach to the difficulties we encounter in our daily lives. Their reflections on time-keeping and good facilitation provide insight whilst the group tackle problems they’ve experienced at work, using different processes and techniques. This material forms part of The Open University course B822, Creativity, innovation and change.
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Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2

4.4 Using information

Our use of information is often biased in important regards. First, we pay more attention to information that is easily available (the availability heuristic). Second, we overweight memories which are more easily retrievable – usually because they are emotionally vivid or have personal relevance (the retrievability heuristic).

We pay selective attention to information, often in a self-serving way. We will often give greater weight to information which shows us in a favou
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2.3 Globalisation

Economic globalisation maybe defined as the increasing interdependence and integration of economic activity in different countries (Thompson, 2000, p. 92). Interdependence means that the production of goods in one country is affected by the production of goods in another. For example, the import of Japanese cars into the UK has affected the UK car industry by taking sales away from it. Integration is a closer relation than interdependence, implying that production processes in different count
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4.12.1 Communities of practice and technology

Communities of practice are technical and social networks which set the context in which new knowledge arises in daily work, and determine how it is shared and interpreted, what counts as important knowledge and how people become recognised as members of that community:

A good deal of new technology attends primarily to individuals and the explicit information that passes between them. To support the flow of knowledge,
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Learning outcomes

After studying this course, you should be able to:

  • discuss how the gas mixture expelled from the engine, and the conversion performance of the three-way catalytic converter, depend on the air/fuel (A/F) ratio

  • list the chemical reactions whereby the three-way catalyst removes carbon monoxide (CO), hydrocarbons and oxides of nitrogen (NOx) from petrol vehicle exhausts

  • interpret the results of experimental studies (involving activity
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4.1.1 Mapping who knows what

One of the most widespread ways to represent what you know is to represent who knows what. This avoids the complications of codifying or storing the knowledge in great detail – you simply map the relevant people to a high-level taxonomy, leaving them to give contextualised answers when asked. Initiatives to provide corporate ‘yellow pages’ which map an organisation by what people know rather than by where they work, or alphabetically, have been reported to be extremely popular and succe
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Introduction

This course covers a few key topics that will help you to think in broad ways about how you and others take decisions; we shall also introduce you to some themes in social science which have direct relevance to managerial decision making. The approach of this course is descriptive: rather than prescribing how you should make decisions we look at frameworks that will help you to understand how decisions are actually made. We aim to help you to develop greater insight into both your own
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1.3 Searching for information on business and management

How well does the following statement match what you do when you begin a new search for information?

Before I begin a new search for information (maybe for an assignment, or to help you choose your next holiday destination), I spend some time thinking about what I already know, what the gaps in my knowledge are, and the best types of information to meet my needs.

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1.1 1 Why include a global dimension in science education?

Western science drew on a world heritage, on the basis of sharing ideas.

Sen (2002)

The global dimension refers to approaches to education … which focus on global issues, events and interdependence. … pupils will develop … an understanding of different cultural and political perspectives, as well as knowledge of
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1.3.7 Encyclopedias

Encyclopedias can be useful reference texts to use to start your research. There are some available online, such as:

WikipediaA freely available collaborative encyclopedia.
Encyclopedia Brita
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5.5 Summary of Section 5

  • The phase of a material is characterised by its physical state (e.g. solid, liquid or gas), a distinctive arrangement of the atoms, and its chemical composition.

  • Material properties can change suddenly as the temperature increases or decreases, corresponding to changes of phase and the degree of order associated with the arrangement of atoms.

  • Shape memory alloys are examples of a wide range of useful engineering materials t
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IDS350 Gardens of California #10 Spring 2015
An examination of the relationship between environment and the flora that surrounds us with Jerry Turney www.YouTube.com/csuDHTV [Please Subscribe]
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References

Cooper, Lord (1991) Scottish Legal Tradition, Edinburgh, Saltire Society.

Robertson, G. (1998) The Justice Game, London, Chatto & Windus.

Scottish Case Digests ‘Adams and others v The Scottish Ministers’, hearing date 28 May 2004 taken from LexisNexis Legal Database.

Walker, D. (1981) The Scottish Legal System, 5th edn, Edinburgh, W Green & Son Ltd.


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Keep on learning

Study another free course

There are more than 800 courses on OpenLearn for you to c
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3.2 Maturity

The maturity of an investment is the date when the investor is contractually entitled to demand repayment of the investment and the associated return. Some investments (such as company shares, as discussed in Section 3.1) actually have no contractual maturity. Others – such as demand deposits at banks – are subject to contractual repayment
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Research plan discussion: The socio-technical construction of MOOCs and educator practices in HE
Research plan discussion: The socio-technical construction of MOOCs and educator practices in HE - Steve White Keywords:Research Seminar , research , WAIS Research Seminar , Web , Computer Science
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Learning outcomes

After studying this course, you should be able to:

  • practise identification of ‘indigenous’ identity and culture

  • practise identification of ‘Roman’ identity and culture

  • study the development of Romano-African culture.


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