1 A history of Bedforshire Mencap

Mencap (ENABLE in Scotland) is one of the UK's largest and best-known voluntary organisations. It was founded in 1946, when Judy Fryd, the mother of a daughter with learning difficulties, wrote to the magazine Nursery World, asking other parents of children with learning difficulties to write to her (Shennan, 1980). They did, in large numbers. One parent, Rene Harris, recalled the impact Judy Fryd had on her:

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Introduction

This unit is from our archive and it is an adapted extract from Care, welfare and community (K202) which is no longer in presentation. If you wish to study formally at The Open University, you may wish to explore the courses we offer in this curriculum area.

A major pressure for change in the way that social welfare services were provided and organised in the latt
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4 Gaynor and Liz comment on Anne's situation

Activity 4

In this final clip, you will Gayor and Liz talk about their views on Anne's situation. Listen to their comments and add any additional points to the notes you began in the previous section.

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3 Anne's experiences

Figure 1
Anne

Anne has arthritis and depression. She is a retired social worker who retired early on health grounds. Her assessment was carried out
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7 Audio clip 4: Paul

Paul was 30 years old when he was interviewed. He had been in and out of homelessness for most of his adult life, but had become a volunteer with the Cyrenians. He was living in a shared house with some other volunteers.

Paul spent much of his childhood in a caravan in Happy Valley, near the sea, with his parents, brothers and sisters. At 21, when he was living with his girlfriend and her parents, his daughter was born. When she was two months old, they were kicked out, and Paul went to
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Activity 2

Shared values for children’s participation

1 hour 0 minutes

In the extract you have read in Activity 1, Leverett identifies a set of shared values developed as part of the ‘Hear by Right’ standa
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Activity 1

Introductory reading on children’s participation

6 hours 0 minutes

Read Chapter 5: ‘Children’s participation’ from Foley and Leverett (2008) Connecting with children: developing working rel
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4.1 Introduction: the social context of social work

Extract 1 discussed the four components of good practice: Knowledge, Skills, Values and Process. From Extract 2 you will now have an understanding of ‘individual people’ in soci
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1.1.1 Frequency

Frequency refers to how often or how frequently someone should exercise. The American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) recommends an exercise frequency of three to five days per week to improve or maintain VO2max (ACSM, 2006). They suggest that people training for sport may need to exercise more frequently.


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Introduction

Some elite athletes in the United Kingdom are provided with financial support to allow them to train and prepare for competition. Where does the money come from to finance this? This unit will examine this question by looking at the funding of elite sport in the UK.

This unit is an adapted extract from the Open University course Introduction to sport, fitness and management (E112)
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3.4 Pharmaceuticals for mental health: a brief history

The ‘revolution’ in drug therapy is widely credited with causing the mass closure of psychiatric hospitals in the 1950s and 1960s, meaning that patients who had previously been considered too much of a danger to themselves or others could be safely housed ‘in the community’ as long as they took the medication. However, the trend for a reduction in numbers was already evident at the time the drugs in question began to be available, and academics such as Joan Busfield and Andrew Scull a
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3.1 Introduction

In this extract you consider mental health as a business. This is not the way mental health services are usually regarded, as it is more common, at least in the UK, to regard them as public services. However, ideas about being more businesslike in health and social care have gained prominence in recent years. What does being a business, or more businesslike, mean? For one thing, it implies a profit motive: goods or services delivered to make money for private companies and their shareholders.
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1.1.1 Assessing your current level of knowledge

If you explore all the resources and activities in this unit, you might need to allow between two and nine hours to complete it.

Before you read this guide, why not use the self-assessment questions on the next screen to rate your current level of knowledge?

Print or save these questions and for each question, mark the most appropriate number on the scale. When you have finished, you can review your answers. A score of three of less might indicate a gap in your knowledge
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References

Baker, C. (ed.) (1998) Human Rights Act 1998: A Practitioner's Guide, London, Sweet and Maxwell.
Bashir, A. (1999) ‘Working in racist Britain’, Community Care, 21–27 October, p. 26.
Biehal, N., Clayden, J., Stein, M. and Wade, J. (1992) Prepared for Living? A Survey of Young People Leaving the Care of Three Local Authorities, London, National Childre
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4.1 Unit themes and social work values

The next activity asks you to consider the relationship between the unit themes and value requirements for social care workers set out below.

Activity 4 Unit themes and social work values

0 hours 20 minutes
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Learning outcomes

On completion of this unit you will have:

  • examined the place play has in the curriculum framework/guidance or documents most relevant to your setting;

  • considered various definitions of play;

  • explored ideas about the value of play and adults' attitudes towards play;

  • considered play in your setting and attempted to access children's perceptions of play;

  • explored issues such as gender and play and children's right to play.
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Acknowledgements

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see terms and conditions), this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence

This extract is taken from D218: Social policy: welfare, power and diversity, produced by the BBC on behalf of the Open Univer
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1 Children's rights: general issues

The audio file in this unit considers the general issues of children's rights, and the possibilities and implications of imagining children as citizens. Within the discussion, ideas about childhood and children's needs are explored. Although the programme focuses specifically on children it is possible to link to the wider issue of social construction of difference and power. Some examples are given in these notes.

This audio file was recorded in 1998 and related to a TV programme on ch
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Learning outcomes

After studying this unit you should be able to:

  • define the broad issue of children as citizens.


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4.7 Summary

  • Piaget proposed that all children pass through an ordered sequence of stages of cognitive development. This development arises through the processes of intrinsic motivation, assimilation and accommodation and equilibriation.

  • Children's actions on the environment are the basic building blocks of development.

  • Piaget argued that children reason differently to adults, as their mental representations of the world are initially c
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