5.2.2 Continuous variables

Not all numbers are discrete. Consider the following measurements:

  • times to run a marathon

  • temperatures recorded at intervals during a day

  • weight of each bunch of grapes sold at a supermarket yesterday.

Time, temperature and weight are all examples of numerical data, but there is not a restricted set of values that they can take. Whereas you can have 2 or 3 children in a family but not 2.5, with tempe
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5 The characteristics of ‘good’ information

Have you ever seen a set of published accounts for a company? If you haven’t or, even if you have, take a look at some now. (They are often called the annual report.)

A large range of information is available online at your fingertips. Some of it is useful, most of it is not. Accountants are increasingly having to deal with growing quantities of information and many are having to search for relevant information as part of their jobs. Some of these activities are designed to dev
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3.1 Background

In practice, there is almost always some element of risk (in the technical sense of ‘uncertainty’) in any investment return. There is in finance the theoretical concept of a truly risk-free asset, but at the moment it is sufficient just to be aware of the main factors causing risk or uncertainty in practice. These are:

  • maturity

  • liquidity

  • variability of income

  • default or credit risk

  • <
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The Ethnographic Dream
In this seminar for the anthropology research group at Oxford on Eastern Medicines and Religions (10 October 2012), Dr Katherine Swancutt discusses 'doing fieldwork among native scholars and shamans', focusing on southwest China.
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9.01 Introduction to Neuroscience (MIT)
This course is an introduction to the mammalian nervous system, with emphasis on the structure and function of the human brain. Topics include the function of nerve cells, sensory systems, control of movement, learning and memory, and diseases of the brain.
Author(s): Bear, Mark,Seung, Sebastian

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Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative C

7.391 Concept-Centered Teaching (MIT)
Do you like teaching, but find yourself frustrated by how little students seem to learn? Would you like to try teaching, but are nervous about whether you will be any good at it? Are you interested in new research on science education? Research in science education shows that the greatest obstacle to student learning is the failure to identify and confront the misconceptions with which the students enter the class or those that they acquire during their studies. This weekly seminar course focuse
Author(s): Khodor, Julia

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Keep on learning

Study another free course

There are more than 800 courses on OpenLearn for you to c
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4.4.1 The map isn't the territory

The expression ‘the map isn't the territory’ draws attention to the difference between complex reality and simplified models of it. Normally, the territory is relatively stable and different maps are produced for different purposes; the territory shapes the maps, not vice versa. However, when the ‘territory’ comprises people who know that they – or their work activities – are being mapped, we find ourselves in a reflexive loop: the people can see how they and their work are
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11.5 Programming languages

A computer program is written in a programming language and contains the instructions that tell the computer what to do. Developers write new software using specialised programming languages. The resulting programs (or 'source code') can be converted into the low-level instructions understood by the processor. There is a wide range of programming languages to suit different types of task; if you look at advertisements for programming jobs in newspapers or online you will get an idea of
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Lesson 03 - One Minute Romanian
In lesson 3 of One Minute Romanian you will learn to say that you can speak a little Romanian. Remember - even a few phrases of a language can help you make friends and enjoy travel more. Find out more about One Minute Romanian at our website - http://www.oneminutelanguages.com. One Minute Romanian is brought to you by the Radio Lingua Network and is ©Copyright 2008.Author(s): No creator set

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2.6.2 Cohere

Cohere is an experimental knowledge mapping tool that runs on the web, connecting you and your ideas to other learners with common interests.


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1.1 ‘Technology’?

In knowledge management literature the term ‘technology’ is assumed to mean digital media and networks: software and hardware that comprise today's ICTs. However, it is important to remember that pens and paper are forms of technology, along with whiteboards, sticky notes, and the other non-digital media that make up the infrastructure of our daily lives at work. These are not about to disappear: paper is robust and portable, text on paper is easily read and annotated, and most organisati
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Memory of Maestro Charles Vest
President Charles Vest conducting the "Stars and Stripes Forever" at Tech Night at the POPS during MIT's Reunion Week, June, 2004. A video reprise.
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3.6.6 Teach to learn

One of the most successful ways to learn something well is to teach it. Select a topic that you feel you know well and try teaching it to an imaginary person. As your teaching proceeds, you will quickly realise where there are gaps in your knowledge and understanding. Immediately you will begin to identify clearly what it is you are explaining. You will become aware of any aspects that you are less clear about, and can focus on those. Imagine you are explaining something to someone who keenly
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1.3 The perils of partnership: policy as an adaptive system

Here the focus is on an organic way of understanding the relationship between policy and action. From this perspective, government, public service organisations, contractors, staff and, more recently, the public themselves are viewed not as cogs in a machine but as mutually interacting elements of an adaptive policy system. As in other organic entities – populations, species, even the human body itself – change takes place around an equilibrium point at which the entity is in balan
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3.2 Room to rattle: modelling thermal expansion

In general, as the temperature of a piece of solid is raised the volume it occupies increases. I say 'in general' because as we shall see it is not always the case, and we ought to investigate whether we can exert any control over the phenomenon – which could be useful. Evidently, if a solid expands, the average spacing between its constituent parts must have increased. Since matter is made up of atoms, the issue is really about the volume occupied by the arrangements of atoms that make up
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4.5.2 n-fold toruses

We can use a similar technique to find the Euler characteristic of a 2-fold torus. If we cut the surface into two, as shown in Figure 95, and separate the pieces, we obtain two copies of a 1-fold torus with 1 hole, each with Euler characteristic −1.

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2.7 Multiple-cause diagrams

As a general rule, an event or outcome will have more than one cause. A multiple-cause diagram will enable you to show the causes and the ways in which they are connected. Suppose, for example, that you were asked to explain why a work group was under-performing. You could use a multiple-cause diagram both to help you to construct the explanation and to present it.

Introduction

School governors need the skills to develop working relationships with the school community. This unit will help you to understand what each stakeholder within the community needs, from headteacher to pupils and parents. Effective interaction between all parties can prevent problems from arising.


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3.3 Limited positive characterization

The painted portrait was, however, perceived to be more than a mere ‘map of the face’. It was also meant to reveal aspects of the inner as well as the outer being.

Figure 10

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