How to control nerves when speaking in public

Many people say that speaking in public is one of the most nerve-racking things they have to do. Here are a few techniques to help you control your nerves.  First, be prepared; the more prepared you are the less nervous you will be.  Next, stretch on your neck and arms.  Third, do lips and jaw exercises; these will help you relax.  And lastly, focus on the audience.  Public speaking is a great activity for kids of all ages.  Thi
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Public Speaking - Organize Main Idea
Nervous about standing in front of your classmates to make a speech? Identify the main ideas of a speech and make an outline. This is a clip from a larger segment. (01:21)
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Exploring the Nervous System
A lesson that focuses on the Autonomic Nervous System and includes sympathetic and parasympathetic processes of the body.
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Review, evaluate and present financial management process improvements
This task looks at how to make sure that the quality of your information keeps up with the demands of your organisation. This learning pack contains information and activities for various ways to review, evaluate and present financial management process improvements covering collection and organising of information; analysing information; presenting information; and contingency planning.
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Organise personal work priorities and development
This unit covers the knowledge and skills required to organise your own work schedules, monitor and obtain feedback on your work performance, and maintain required levels of competence. Topics include goal-setting, organisation, self-evaluation and professional development.
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Provide human resources consultancy services
Defines human resources services in an organisation as either strategic or operational. Describes how operational services can be devolved to others in the organisation while human resources consultants concentrate on the strategic. Strategic services are identified through a needs analysis, delivered and promoted, monitored, maintained and evaluated by those in the consultant role.
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54th BFI London Film Festival Vodcast Day 11
Day 11 of the 54th BFI London Film Festival saw Colin Firth's organisation Brightwide hold their second annual event at BFI Southbank. The featured film was Christy Turlington Burns' documentary No Woman No Cry which investigates maternal mortality and pregnancy care worldwide. Darren Aronofsky gave an American Express Screen Talk, discussing a life in pictures. At the filmmaker tea we caught up with a number of international directors, including Jamie Thraves (Treacle Jr) and Kim Longinotto (Pi
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6.1 Introduction

Whatever else they may be, religions grow in historical and social settings. The present form of a religion has its roots in the past. Religion can exercise a strong influence upon society and the cultural forms of a society, but religion itself is no less affected by changes and pressures within society. Religion gives meaning to a pattern of living and may even be responsible for establishing a certain lifestyle or distinctive social organisation or institution. At the same time, religion o
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The North Atlantic Treaty Organisation’s New Strategic Concept
The North Atlantic Treaty Organisation (NATO) is a politico-military alliance of countries from Europe and North America. It provides a unique link between these two continents for consultation and…
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Commonwealth of Learning Copyright Audit
To a significant extent, copyright law governs the production, dissemination and consumption of knowledge and culture. In an "information society" it is particularly important to ensure that the gates of learning are kept wide open. It is in this context that an examination of copyright law with respect to education becomes crucial. When performing an audit of copyright law, it is essential to keep in mind international treaty obligations: particularly, the Berne Convention, the Agreement on tra
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4 How do organisations become market leaders?

Drucker (1992) wrote:

The five most important questions you will ever ask about your organization [are]:

  • What is our business?

  • Who is our customer?

  • What does our customer consider value?

  • What have been our results?

  • What is our plan?

Can you answer these questions for your own organisation? I don't expect you to know all the answers now. Try to think about them
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3.3 Implications of market orientation

An organisation that develops and performs its production and marketing activities with the aim of satisfying the needs of its customers is market oriented. However, using market-led ideas in the non-profit sector requires a fundamental shift in organisational philosophy. Identifying those people who add value to the service means renaming some users ‘customers’. It also means that you have to establish what they want before you begin the planning processes and you have to con
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3.2 Who is the customer?

Customers are people who buy our products and services, and may or may not use them. The key to defining these people as ‘customers’ is that each engages in an exchange relationship that adds value to the organisation providing the product or service. Consumers do not give any value to organisations – there is no exchange relationship. They use products and services, but do not buy them.

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3.1 The NSPCC's 'FULL STOP' campaign

An example of a marketing communications campaign is given below. This National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Childred (NSPCC) campaign was named a ‘Campaign of the Year’ in the CIM&Sol;Marketing Week's 1999 marketing effectiveness awards.

Example 3 NSPCC's 'FULL STOP' campaign

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2.4 Marketing as a management process

This last definition is the one that most modern marketing writers support. Piercy (1997) makes a distinction between ‘marketing plan marketing' – the activities that traditional marketing departments do – and the concept of ‘going to market’ – a much more general management issue. He writes:

‘Marketing’ belongs to marketing specialists but ‘going to market’ is a process own
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2.2 Marketing as a job title

The term ‘marketing’ became common in the UK during the 1960s. During that time it was quite common for businesses to rename their sales departments marketing departments. Communications and sales managers became marketing managers. Stephen King called this ‘thrust marketing’ (King, 1985). Although the functional name changed, managers typically still placed an emphasis on selling what the organisation made or the services it offered, cutting costs and manipulating prices, r
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2.1 Three approaches to marketing

This section has been written with the assumption that you have some prior marketing knowledge. As a brief revision you will read how marketing can be described both as an organisation-wide customer-orientated philosophy and as a functional department that handles activities concerned with understanding and satisfying customers’ needs. Studies show a direct link between the success of an organisation and the extent of its market orientation. These marketing concepts are applicable to both f
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5 Summary

The aim of this Unit has been to give you an introductory overview of operations management. Operations is one of the central functions of all organisations The first learning outcome was that you should be able to ‘define “operations” and “operations management”’. I took the view in this session that operations embraces all the activities required to create and deliver an organisation's goods or services to its customers or clients.

The secon
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4.1 The boundary of the operations system

The simple transformation model in Figure 1 provides a powerful tool for looking at operations in many different contexts. It helps us to analyse and design operations in many types of organisation at many levels.

This model can be developed by identifying the boundaries of the operations system through which an organisation's goods or services are provided to its customers or clients. Figure 3, shows this boundary an
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3.4 Transformation processes

A transformation process is any activity or group of activities that takes one or more inputs, transforms and adds value to them, and provides outputs for customers or clients. Where the inputs are raw materials, it is relatively easy to identify the transformation involved, as when milk is transformed into cheese and butter. Where the inputs are information or people, the nature of the transformation may be less obvious. For example, a hospital transforms ill patients (the input) into health
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