Ute Daniel: Goebbels, War and Propaganda. The Media Logic of the "Third Reich"
Gerda Henkel Visiting Professorship Lecture. The notorious speech of the German Minister for Propaganda, Joseph Goebbels, February 1943 in the Sportpalast has been studied by historians a good many times. In this lecture it is analyzed in a slightly different way: as an example which illustrates problems Goebbels had with the media logic of the "Third Reich".
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3.5 Arousal (continued)

Question 9

What alternatives to shivering might act as a source of heat?

Answer

BMR is maintained mainly by a number of tissues with high metabolic a
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4.4.1 Tidal Energy

The energy that causes the slow but regular rise and fall of the tides around our coastlines is not the same as that which creates waves. It is caused principally by the gravitational pull of the moon on the world's oceans. The sun also plays a minor role, not through its radiant energy but in the form of its gravitational pull, which exerts a small additional effect on tidal rhythms.

The principal technology for harnessing tidal energy essentially involves building a low dam, or barrag
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ILP Best Wishes 2013/2014
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Episode 9: Interview with Samantha Kalman | Level Up

Level Up is a show devoted to game development. Each show will recap current news and events in gaming, deep dive with a game industry insider, and cover tips for programming or finding resources to help you with game construction. We would love to hear from you with feedback or suggestions for what you would like to see on the show, or just tell us about the projects you are working on. Write us at LevelUp@microsoft.com

In this episode, Soumow
Author(s): Greg Duncan, Soumow

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Counting to Ten in Chinese (1-10)
Learn how to count to 10 in Chinese.  (03:03)
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Java4585: Getting Started with Search Engines
R.G. (Dick) Baldwin
The purpose of this module is to get you started with Search Engines
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2.6 Mind mapping

The term mind mapping was devised by Tony Buzan for the representation of such things as ideas, notes and information, in radial tree diagrams — sometimes also called spider diagrams. These are now very widely used — try a web search on ‘Buzan’, ‘mind map’ or ‘concept map’.

Author(s): The Open University

3.3 Care: a contested word

You have seen that the words used to label people who are seen as needing care can stigmatise them. By picking them out as unlike ‘normal’ people, people who do not need care, they can feel belittled, de-humanised and deprived of respect. But it is not just the labels like ‘mentally handicapped’, ‘lunatic’ or ‘mentally ill’ that are at issue. ‘Care’ as a word is itself under attack:

The t
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7.342 G-Protein Coupled Receptors: Vision and Disease (MIT)
How do we communicate with the outside world? How are our senses of vision, smell, taste and pain controlled at the cellular and molecular levels? What causes medical conditions like allergies, hypertension, depression, obesity and various central nervous system disorders? G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) provide a major part of the answer to all of these questions. GPCRs constitute the largest family of cell-surface receptors and in humans are encoded by more than 1,000 genes. GPCRs convert
Author(s): Kota, Parvathi

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Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative C

Lesson 04 - One Minute Luxembourgish
In lesson 04 of One Minute Luxembourgish you will learn how to say that you don't understand something. Remember - even a few phrases of a language can help you make friends and enjoy travel more. Find out more about One Minute Languages at our website - http://www.oneminutelanguages.com. One Minute Luxembourgish is brought to you by the Radio Lingua Network and is ©Copyright 2008.Author(s): No creator set

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3.1 Social work values and legal values

Social work practice is founded on and informed by a value base; however, this value base is uncertain and changing (Shardlow, 1998). It is important that practitioners are able to reflect on their values and prejudices and consider the implications of these for practice. The next activity requires you to think about this before going on to look in more detail at what is meant by social work values.

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Técnicas de trabajo cooperativo y aprendizaje cooperativo en ambientes virtuales
Questo modulo introduce e discute metodologie e tecniche per promuovere l'apprendimento cooperativo e collaborativo in ambienti virtuali.,This module introduces and further discusses methodologies and tecniques for promoting cooperative and collaborative learning in virtual learning environments.,Este modulo afronta el tema de la sociedad del conocimiento y de la inteligencia conectiva en la cual los individuos no deberàn “saber todo” sino que deberàn disponer sobretodo de competencias met
Author(s): Banzato, Monica

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2.5 Design implications

The difficulties just described have very practical implications when it comes to designing technologies. Consider the following quotations:

in selecting any representation we are in the very same act unavoidably making a set of decisions about how and what to see in the world …

a knowledge representation is a set of ontological commitments. It is unavoidably so because of the inevitable imperfections of
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Historical Interactions between Science and Religion part two
Talk given by Prof. Colin Russell as part of short course 1
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6 Concluding thoughts

We seem to have come a long way and covered a great deal of ground since I approached this subject by explaining that a mechanism must exist to help us focus on one sound out of many. That clearly is one function of attention, but attention seems to have other functions too. The results of visual search experiments show that attention is a vital factor in joining together the features that make up an object, and the experiences of brain-damaged patients suggest that this feature-assembly role
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1.3.7 Models of adjustment

Here we have talked about changes of place as having a particular impact on an individual's sense of well-being or self-esteem. Relocation and separation from familiar places just like separation from loved ones can be experienced as a form of loss which can have devastating effects for some people. Some authors have seen changes in self-esteem as the key to understanding how people cope with change. For example, Hopson and Adams (1976) suggest that any transition, whatever triggers it, sets
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Health and environment
To be able to understand the importance of the environment for our health, we need to know a little about the interdependence between environment and humankind. This free course, Health and environment, will look at interactions between plants, animals and the physical and chemical environment, as well as considering ways in which humans have altered, and are altering this environment. Author(s): Creator not set

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Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2

Management in Chinese cultures
What can we learn from the way business is done in Asian cultures? The dominant management philosophy in the Asia-Pacific region is a Chinese one, emphasising Confucian values, the family and respect for authority. Does the enduring success of this approach have important lessons for us in the West, or is this management style increasingly redundant, as economies and companies internationalise and mature? This album visits several companies in Asia to explore the relationship between value syste
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1.6 Defining global markets

Global markets for manufactured goods, as opposed to, say, primary commodities such as oil and timber, arose largely in the second half of the twentieth century as trade between countries intensified. The lowering of transport costs and the relative fall in trade barriers enabled firms in one country to compete wit
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