3 Sharing the workload

The new terms of reference for the premises committee of one nursery school were clear. The committee would meet three times: in October, February and June. In October they would tour the school with the headteacher and agree what improvements could be made to the school environment. In February they would check how the work was progressing, identify the money that was to be available from the budget in April, and agree thei
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and/or otherwise stated (see terms and conditions) the content in OpenLearn is released for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share

4.4.1 Do – anticipate that there may be disabled students

Every subject area is likely to have potential disabled students. Regardless of any feeling that you may have that students with particular disabilities will never want to do your course, you have to consider that they might apply and that you have a duty to consider your response.


Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and/or otherwise stated (see terms and conditions) the content in OpenLearn is released for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share

Reading and writing

Currently, over 97 per cent of primary schools use a commercial reading scheme and most have programmes for teaching phonics. Beginning readers commonly take words and reading books home to practise. Many schools use class and group novel studies to extend, or in the upper primary stages, to replace the reading scheme. Schools also supplement reading schemes with a variety of reading activities structured around the 5–14 strands.

Reading schemes are used in attainment groups, but whol
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and/or otherwise stated (see terms and conditions) the content in OpenLearn is released for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share

Acknowledgements

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see terms and conditions), this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence

Author

Sue Platt has been a school governor for 21 years, at both primary and secondary
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and/or otherwise stated (see terms and conditions) the content in OpenLearn is released for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share

Learning outcomes

By the end of this unit, you will have:

  • an awareness of methods of introducing film music to secondary school pupils;

  • an understanding of how the concept of music accompanying image can be applied to skills of composition;

  • an awareness of how to develop techniques of appraising and analysing film music through classroom activities.


Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and/or otherwise stated (see terms and conditions) the content in OpenLearn is released for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share

References

Claiborne, R. (1983; this edition 1990) The Life and Times of the English Language: The History of our Marvellous Native Tongue, Bloomsbury.
Tolkien, J. R. R. (1954; this edition 2003) The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers, HarperCollins.
Bodmer, F. (1943) The Loom of Language, London: Allen & Unwin (republished Merlin Press, 1981).
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and/or otherwise stated (see terms and conditions) the content in OpenLearn is released for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share

Acknowledgements

Author Details

Professor David Lambert is Chief Executive of the Geographical but remains Research Associate of the Institute of Education (London). He is a former secondary geography teacher (for 12 years) and developed a scholarly interest in assessment issues following the introduction of the national curriculum. He also has a research interest in the way teachers select and use textbooks with pupils. He has a long-standing concern with mo
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and/or otherwise stated (see terms and conditions) the content in OpenLearn is released for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share

Acknowledgements

Author Details

Amanda Burrows is a graduate of Laban and gained an MA in Education from The Open University. She has taught dance in secondary schools, FE colleges, universities and in community settings. Amanda is currently Head of Curriculum for Visual, Performing Arts and Media at Grantham College, and has produced materials for the Open Univerity's Teachandlearn.net, repurposed here for openlearn.

Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and/or otherwise stated (see terms and conditions) the content in OpenLearn is released for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share

4 Performance skills

Performance skills are those aspects that set dancing apart from mechanical movement. Often, our attention is drawn to the dancer who is using a range of performance skills effectively, because they stand out from the rest.

Performance skills are aspects such as:

  • focus;

  • projection;

  • musicality;

  • timing;

  • emphasis;

  • expression.

All of these aspects a
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and/or otherwise stated (see terms and conditions) the content in OpenLearn is released for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share

1.3 Warm-up activities

A variety of actions might be included in warm-up activities, and there is good reason for keeping these simple and repetitive. If the brain and muscles have to concentrate on learning new and complex patterns of movement, then this takes attention away from raising the core body temperature by 1 or 2 degrees and increasing the heart rate enough to perspire.

Movements might include:

  • walks gradually increasing in speed to a small run;


  • Author(s): The Open University

    License information
    Related content

    Except for third party materials and/or otherwise stated (see terms and conditions) the content in OpenLearn is released for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share

Acknowledgements

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see terms and conditions), this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence

Author Details

This unit was originally prepared for TeachandLearn.net by Diane Ne
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and/or otherwise stated (see terms and conditions) the content in OpenLearn is released for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share

4.1 Introduction

Evidence about teaching and learning is now collected for many purposes: systematic teacher appraisal, induction training for newly qualified teachers, developing the skills of initial trainees or honing those of more experienced practitioners as they work towards threshold targets. Much of this evidence is gained through observations of lessons and conversations or interviews with teachers, student teachers and pupils. As Wragg (1994) has suggested, if lessons are worth observing they are al
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and/or otherwise stated (see terms and conditions) the content in OpenLearn is released for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share

2.2 Working together to support and challenge

Planning and evaluation are essential aspects of teaching, but very difficult to observe. Through working together and collaboratively planning teaching and evaluating lessons, the student teacher can learn how experienced teachers carry these out. This phase is an important transition between the student teacher supporting the mentor in the classroom, and taking full responsibility for the class. Involving student teachers in the minutiae of lesson planning is an important part of helping th
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and/or otherwise stated (see terms and conditions) the content in OpenLearn is released for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share

1.3.12 Internet resources

There are many websites where you will find useful information for education. With all information on the internet you need to make a judgement on the reliability of the information.

UCAS (Universities and Colleges Admissions Service for the UK) Site contents include course information
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and/or otherwise stated (see terms and conditions) the content in OpenLearn is released for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share

3.3 Distinctive contributions

In Activity 1 you looked at brief descriptions of the duties of classroom support staff working in eight schools across the UK. Despite the brevity of information, there is sufficient to suggest that teaching assistants in these schools have wide ranging roles, and that their different titles relate to different types of responsibilities. Let us now consider the essential nature of the work that assistants do and the way they contribute to the totality of work in a classroom.

Are teachi
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and/or otherwise stated (see terms and conditions) the content in OpenLearn is released for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share

1.4 Ways of working and contributing

The physical design of most primary schools certainly reflects the expectation that teachers work in classrooms with large numbers of children. In fact, given their large classes, most schools feel quite crowded. The employment of teaching assistants has doubled the number of adults working in some classrooms and, as Schlapp and Davidson note in the pdf document attached in Author(s): The Open University

6.5 Espejo Cultural

Actividad 6.4

This activity will help you think about some of the possible differences between public places in Spain and Latin America, and in your own country.

1 Think of the different public places in Spain and Latin America that
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and/or otherwise stated (see terms and conditions) the content in OpenLearn is released for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share

5.2 Actividad

Actividad 5.1

1 Look at this photo of a bar in Havana, Cuba. What can you see? Below it is a list of objects, some of which appear in the photo. Tick the ones you can see. Look up the words you don’ t understand in the dictionary.


Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and/or otherwise stated (see terms and conditions) the content in OpenLearn is released for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share

4.8.1 Using grammatical information in the dictionary

Your dictionary is very useful for finding out which grammatical category a word belongs to. For example, the entry for precioso reads as follows:

precioso ADJETIVO

beautiful ¡Es precioso! It's beautiful!

The entry tells you that precioso is an adjetivo , in English an adjective, and that it therefore describes a noun. If you want to know more about what the different grammatical categories are, read the information at the beginning of y
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and/or otherwise stated (see terms and conditions) the content in OpenLearn is released for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share

4.4 Actividad


Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and/or otherwise stated (see terms and conditions) the content in OpenLearn is released for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share

SAYING WHERE YOU ARE GOING
To say where someone is going, use the verb ir ( ‘to go’ ) followed by the preposition a ( ‘to’).
Note that the verb ir is irregular (i.e. it does not follow a regular pattern).
IR