2.3.2 Why are boys more vulnerable to some conditions?

In some conditions that affect more males than females (such as colourblindness), the explanation has been found to lie in genes on the X chromosome. Most females have two X chromosomes (one inherited from each parent) while most males have an XY combination. This means that if someone should inherit an X-linked gene predisposing to a particular condition, compensation for this will be easier for a female (whose other X chromosome may have a ‘normal’ copy of the gene) than for a male. How
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1.7.2 Differentiating within dyslexia – acquired versus developmental dyslexia and the search

There has also been continued debate regarding the variability within any dyslexic population, the apparent variety of forms that dyslexia can take. Given the complexity of the skills required to develop fluent reading and spelling perhaps this is not surprising. The variability within dyslexia may simply reflect the fact that this complex process can go wrong in different ways and for different reasons.

The term ‘dyslexia’ was originally used to refer to the acquired dysl
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1.5.1 Different ways of working

Composing for an entire film is an intense and intensive experience, which must usually be completed in a very short time. Composers are always the last people to work on a film, and cannot begin writing the score until the final edit of the film is ready, often only a few weeks before the film is to be released.

Composers work in many different ways: David Arnold (the current James Bond composer) uses an electronic keyboard and computers to record and manipulate his ideas, which are or
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4.4 Summary

In this section, you have had the opportunity to work on some mathematical activities yourself. This should have enabled you to:

  • reflect on how you approach mathematics and what helps you to work on a piece of mathematics;

  • remind yourself of those pieces of mathematics that you can work at successfully;

  • identify aspects of mathematics that you can strengthen as you work through the later blocks of this course;


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2.6 Context and language variation

As well as contributing to meaning, context can also influence the actual words and sentences that we use. Do you sometimes say ‘Hi’ and at other times say ‘Good morning’? Do you have a ‘telephone voice’? This variation in language may be done deliberately, but often it is not. There are two main reasons as to why we adjust the way we speak:

  • to fit in with our audience or what we feel they expect of us; you may use ‘professional’ langua
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3.8 The impact of 'racialisation'

Activity 7

0 hours 20 minutes

Imagine that you are a white advice worker who has had little contact with African–Caribbean families. Your view of African–Carib
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5 Distance and closeness

A lot of emotional labour is concerned with getting the right balance between being close, friendly and warm, and maintaining a proper distance. Lawler writes about learning emotional control by sticking to a set procedure and cultivating an ‘air of detachment’ (1991, p. 126). In terms of care work it is never quite clear which side to err on – being too cold would be seen as unprofessional, but so is being too familiar.

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3 Silences and concealment

Anthropologists and psychoanalysts use the term ‘taboo’ to describe forbidden activities, feelings or relationships. All societies seem to have particular rules and rituals to deal with bodily functions, sexuality and death, sometimes expressed in terms of hygiene or religion, and these keep them separated off from everyday life. When social rules function well they are invisible. We only notice them when we have committed a faux pas and caused embarrassment.

Marie very quick
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3: Testing the limits

Choosing Jim and Marianne as the central case study in the course was a deliberate strategy to enable you to consider conflicts at the very heart of health and social care:

  • the rights of the individual versus the rights of the community

  • the nature of community for people who have no settled abode

  • dilemmas about apportioning limited resources.

Following their story is a way of testing the limits of hea
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1.2.5 Together Forever

At the opposite end of the spectrum stand Paul and Gemma Massey, the British co-ordinators of Together Forever, an affiliation of the Flame Foundation, a group of self-proclaimed physically immortal people in Arizona. The Foundation began some 30 years ago after an Evangelical minister, Charles Paul Brown, claimed to have had a ‘cellular awakening’ in which Christ told him that physical immortality was the true Christian message.

The group claims to have about 2,000 members world-wi
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3.1 Introduction

This section builds upon the previous two by encouraging you to critically examine the importance of language in constructing social work relationships. The activities highlight key messages about the power of talk in helping people to make sense of their experiences, take control and make changes to their lives. The ‘power of talk’ applies as much to social workers as to the service users with whom they work. However, the reality of social work practice suggests that ‘making sense, tak
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1.2 Hearing about critical practice

Activity 2

1 hour 0 minutes

Listen to the following audio clips, ‘Panel discussion on critical practice’, Part 1: Critical practice.

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Acknowledgements

The content acknowledged below is Proprietary (see terms and conditions) and is used under licence.

Grateful acknowledgement is made to the following sources for permission to reproduce material in this course:

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3.2 Racism in mental health services

Research has shown that people from particular minority ethnic groups are over-represented in some psychiatric diagnostic categories compared with others. One of the most hotly debated issues concerns what appears to be the relatively high number of African-Caribbean men who receive a diagnosis of schizophrenia, compared with white or other minority ethnic groups. Given what you have seen about the difficulties in defining mental health and illness, it will be no surprise to learn that
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3.1 Understanding stigma

In the first half of Section 3, the focus is on the nature of the stigmatisation and discrimination which can be experienced by people with mental health problems. The section then turns to consider racism in mental health services and the impact this has on black service users.

The ‘stigma’ of mental illness and distress refers to the idea that such experiences are a disgrace or an embarrassment, not only to the person concerned, but also to those around them. To be mentally distre
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2 Social work skills: empowerment and advocacy

Qualified social workers are expected to have the necessary skills to empower service users to participate in assessments and decision making and also to ensure that service users have access to advocacy services if they are unable to represent their own views. The requirement for these skills can be found in the key role ‘Support, representation and advocacy’. Both empowerment and advocacy are concerned with power and the ways in which it is distributed between people. Empowerment and ad
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4.4 Observing play

Observing children's play offers an important way in which adults can monitor and assess children's progress.

Logging children's use of a particular activity or play scenario helps practitioners monitor how children use their time, their particular interests and any gaps in their experiences, so that practitioners can plan a balanced curriculum that takes note of children's strengths, interests and needs.

(QC
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Middle School Portal: Math and Science Pathways (MSP2)
This resource discusses how scientists and engineers study biological systems to develop artificial systems, in this case artificial olfaction. The sense of smell is extremely complex, and scientists working on artificial olfaction have had to study this biological system extensively to extract some basic principles upon which to build their devices. Disciplines of emphasis will involve biology, chemistry, electronics, and teamwork. Copyright 2005 International Technology Education Association
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