Choral Vespers Worship Service - 2/12/15
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Conclusion

Session 1

Scattering is a process in which incident particles interact with a target and are changed in nature, number, speed or direction of motion as a result. Tunnelling is a quantum phenomenon in which particles that are incident on a classically impenetrable barrier are able to pass through the barrier and e
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Interaction Between Earth's Core and the Magnetic Field
Part I in the discussion What is the interaction between Earth's core and the magnetic field? Therese Moretto Jorgensen – National Science Foundation reports involvement in a satellite project studying the magnetic field around the Earth and it’s relationship with the Sun. Specifically studying how this affects the aurora. Run time 03:38.
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The emerging SSME agenda
Services science has become one of the major areas of research into the nature of innovation within organisations and within national economies. Judge Business School, in conjunction with IBM, a leading organisation at the vanguard of services science research, recently designed an elective on services sciences for its current MBA class. Key speakers Kevin Bishop, Vice President, Marketing and Communications, Northeast Europe, IBM, Michael Lyons, Manager, BT Group Chief Technology Office, and Da
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2.4.1 Electromagnetism and fields

When Newton wrote about 'The System of the World' in Part 3 of Principia, the only forces he could discuss in any detail were the contact forces that arose when one object touched another, and gravity, which acted at a distance. Even so, Newton thought that there were other forces at work in the world, and hoped they might eventually be brought within his overall scheme just as gravity had been. In fact, Newton wrote:


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6.2.4 The speed and direction of the Earth's motion

The first significant claim to have detected the motion of the Earth relative to the ‘frame of isotropic 3 K radiation’ came in 1977 from a group at Berkeley, California. They concluded that the Earth is moving at a speed of (390 ± 60) km s−1, in a direction towards the constellation Leo, relative to a frame in which the 3 K radiation is isotropic. Their conclusion resulted from observations of a variation of intensity with angle of the form predicted by Equation 14, which w
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1 Attachment to place

In this course we are going to consider the way in which people identify and become attached to places, buildings, objects, and how this attachment can contribute to personal well-being or how we feel about ourselves (Low and Altman, 1992). Looking at why places become important provides a basis for asking questions about what happens when people have to move, a common occurrence for people in need of care services.

The purpose of this course is to focus on the psychological environment
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5.2.2 Continuous variables

Not all numbers are discrete. Consider the following measurements:

  • times to run a marathon

  • temperatures recorded at intervals during a day

  • weight of each bunch of grapes sold at a supermarket yesterday.

Time, temperature and weight are all examples of numerical data, but there is not a restricted set of values that they can take. Whereas you can have 2 or 3 children in a family but not 2.5, with tempe
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5 The characteristics of ‘good’ information

Have you ever seen a set of published accounts for a company? If you haven’t or, even if you have, take a look at some now. (They are often called the annual report.)

A large range of information is available online at your fingertips. Some of it is useful, most of it is not. Accountants are increasingly having to deal with growing quantities of information and many are having to search for relevant information as part of their jobs. Some of these activities are designed to dev
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3.1 Background

In practice, there is almost always some element of risk (in the technical sense of ‘uncertainty’) in any investment return. There is in finance the theoretical concept of a truly risk-free asset, but at the moment it is sufficient just to be aware of the main factors causing risk or uncertainty in practice. These are:

  • maturity

  • liquidity

  • variability of income

  • default or credit risk

  • <
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9.01 Introduction to Neuroscience (MIT)
This course is an introduction to the mammalian nervous system, with emphasis on the structure and function of the human brain. Topics include the function of nerve cells, sensory systems, control of movement, learning and memory, and diseases of the brain.
Author(s): Bear, Mark,Seung, Sebastian

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Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative C

7.391 Concept-Centered Teaching (MIT)
Do you like teaching, but find yourself frustrated by how little students seem to learn? Would you like to try teaching, but are nervous about whether you will be any good at it? Are you interested in new research on science education? Research in science education shows that the greatest obstacle to student learning is the failure to identify and confront the misconceptions with which the students enter the class or those that they acquire during their studies. This weekly seminar course focuse
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1.3.3 Reverse turns and loops

In compact globular proteins, a polypeptide often makes a sharp turn called a reverse turn. For instance, these turns often link adjacent strands in antiparallel β pleated sheet (as represented in Figure 12a). Also known as β bends, reverse turns involve four amino acid residues with a hydrogen bond between the C=O group of the
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Keep on learning

Study another free course

There are more than 800 courses on OpenLearn for you to c
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4.4.1 The map isn't the territory

The expression ‘the map isn't the territory’ draws attention to the difference between complex reality and simplified models of it. Normally, the territory is relatively stable and different maps are produced for different purposes; the territory shapes the maps, not vice versa. However, when the ‘territory’ comprises people who know that they – or their work activities – are being mapped, we find ourselves in a reflexive loop: the people can see how they and their work are
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Regents Park Mosque DP148098

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The Islamic Cultural Centre and The London Central Mosque, 146 Park Road, Regents Park, Westminster, London. <br> Photographed from the south-west in February 2012.
© Historic England Archive


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11.5 Programming languages

A computer program is written in a programming language and contains the instructions that tell the computer what to do. Developers write new software using specialised programming languages. The resulting programs (or 'source code') can be converted into the low-level instructions understood by the processor. There is a wide range of programming languages to suit different types of task; if you look at advertisements for programming jobs in newspapers or online you will get an idea of
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Lesson 03 - One Minute Romanian
In lesson 3 of One Minute Romanian you will learn to say that you can speak a little Romanian. Remember - even a few phrases of a language can help you make friends and enjoy travel more. Find out more about One Minute Romanian at our website - http://www.oneminutelanguages.com. One Minute Romanian is brought to you by the Radio Lingua Network and is ©Copyright 2008.Author(s): No creator set

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2.6.2 Cohere

Cohere is an experimental knowledge mapping tool that runs on the web, connecting you and your ideas to other learners with common interests.


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7.2.11 Dynamic pricing

The dynamic pricing model is one which has a number of different instantiations. Basically, such models treat the price of a product or service (primarily a product) as variable and open to negotiation.

The name-your-price instantiation of this model is where the customer of a site offers the price that he or she thinks is reasonable for a product or service. The administrator of the website will pass on this bid to the provider of the product or service who will decide whether t
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