1.1 ‘Technology’?

In knowledge management literature the term ‘technology’ is assumed to mean digital media and networks: software and hardware that comprise today's ICTs. However, it is important to remember that pens and paper are forms of technology, along with whiteboards, sticky notes, and the other non-digital media that make up the infrastructure of our daily lives at work. These are not about to disappear: paper is robust and portable, text on paper is easily read and annotated, and most organisati
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Memory of Maestro Charles Vest
President Charles Vest conducting the "Stars and Stripes Forever" at Tech Night at the POPS during MIT's Reunion Week, June, 2004. A video reprise.
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3.6.6 Teach to learn

One of the most successful ways to learn something well is to teach it. Select a topic that you feel you know well and try teaching it to an imaginary person. As your teaching proceeds, you will quickly realise where there are gaps in your knowledge and understanding. Immediately you will begin to identify clearly what it is you are explaining. You will become aware of any aspects that you are less clear about, and can focus on those. Imagine you are explaining something to someone who keenly
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1.3 The perils of partnership: policy as an adaptive system

Here the focus is on an organic way of understanding the relationship between policy and action. From this perspective, government, public service organisations, contractors, staff and, more recently, the public themselves are viewed not as cogs in a machine but as mutually interacting elements of an adaptive policy system. As in other organic entities – populations, species, even the human body itself – change takes place around an equilibrium point at which the entity is in balan
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3.2 Room to rattle: modelling thermal expansion

In general, as the temperature of a piece of solid is raised the volume it occupies increases. I say 'in general' because as we shall see it is not always the case, and we ought to investigate whether we can exert any control over the phenomenon – which could be useful. Evidently, if a solid expands, the average spacing between its constituent parts must have increased. Since matter is made up of atoms, the issue is really about the volume occupied by the arrangements of atoms that make up
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2.7 Multiple-cause diagrams

As a general rule, an event or outcome will have more than one cause. A multiple-cause diagram will enable you to show the causes and the ways in which they are connected. Suppose, for example, that you were asked to explain why a work group was under-performing. You could use a multiple-cause diagram both to help you to construct the explanation and to present it.

Introduction

School governors need the skills to develop working relationships with the school community. This unit will help you to understand what each stakeholder within the community needs, from headteacher to pupils and parents. Effective interaction between all parties can prevent problems from arising.


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3.3 Limited positive characterization

The painted portrait was, however, perceived to be more than a mere ‘map of the face’. It was also meant to reveal aspects of the inner as well as the outer being.

Figure 10

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2.3.8 Sphere

Surfaces can be constructed in a similar way from plane figures other than polygons. For example, starting with a disc, we can fold the left-hand half over onto the right-hand half, and identify the edges labelled a, as shown in Figure 36; this is rather like zipping up a purse, or ‘crimping’ a Cornish pasti
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Tasting menu: Audio highlights from the December 1st 2018 edition

China still relies on the outside world for its computer chips – how far should America go to maintain silicon supremacy? Also, democratising lunar landings and why it is so difficult to open a pub in Ireland. Christopher Lockwood hosts


Music by Chris Zabriskie "Candlepower" (CC x 4.0)


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Virtual Maths, Brick Density, Water Displacement method video
Video demonstrating how to measure the density of a brick using the water displacement method.
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Virtual Maths, Brick Density - Water Displacement method
Presentation explaining how to calculate the density of a brick using water displacement method.
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Fair Health: Health Inequities Within and Between Countries - A Global Challenge
The 20th century has seen impressive gains in health and life expectancy in many parts of the world – but these improvements are unequally distributed. In every country, poor people and those from socially disadvantaged groups get sicker and die sooner than people in more privileged social positions. Not only is there a gap in health between the best-off and the worst-off in society, there is a gradient in health running between them. This gradient can be linked clearly to social and economic
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2.2 We are part of nature

Take a few minutes to look around at your surroundings before you read on. What do you see? Obviously this depends on where you are at the moment: at home, at work, or perhaps travelling in between, or maybe you have the misfortune to be laid up in hospital. Possibly like me you are at home. I am fortunate to have a study where I do much of my writing and you won't be surprised to hear that I'm looking at a computer screen at the moment. What else can I see? Books and bookshelves, furniture o
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Human Emotion 16.1: Physical Health I (Sleep)
Human Emotion; Professor June Gruber, Yale University 00:00 Chapter 1. Introduction to Lecture 01:45 Chapter 2. Sleep 101 09.30 Chapter 3. What Good is Sleep? 18:50 Chapter 4. Take-Away Questions 19:18 Chapter 5. Expert Interview This course is part of a broader educational mission to share the study of human emotion beyond the boundaries of the classroom in order to reach students and teachers alike, both locally and globally, through the use of technology. This mission is generously suppor
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2.6 Mind mapping

The term mind mapping was devised by Tony Buzan for the representation of such things as ideas, notes and information, in radial tree diagrams — sometimes also called spider diagrams. These are now very widely used — try a web search on ‘Buzan’, ‘mind map’ or ‘concept map’.

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Virtual Maths - 2D Shapes, triangle
Interactive simulation demonstrating calculation of area of a triangle
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A public address by Shinzo Abe, Prime Minister of Japan | Institute of Politics
Japanese Prime Minister, Shinzo Abe, addressed the John F. Kennedy Jr. Forum on a range of policy issues affecting his country and Asian community. Prime Minister Abe discussed Japan's history on the world stage, gender equality, and upcoming economic reforms. The Forum was moderated by Dean David Ellwood.
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3 Orogenies in the Proterozoic

The document attached below includes the third section of Mountain building in Scotland. In this section, you will find the following subsections:

  • 3.1 Introduction

  • 3.2 Palaeoproterozoic rifting, sedimentation and magmatism

  • 3.3 The Palaeoproterozoic Laxfordian Orogeny

    • 3.3.1 Assembly of the Lewisian Complex

    • 3.3.2 Formation of Proterozoic crust


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Exploring the boundaries of international law
This free course, Exploring the boundaries of international law, is designed to provide you with an introduction to key concepts underpinning your study of international law. It introduces the concept of international legal personality, explores the status of the state, the principle of sovereignty and summarises the principles of jurisdiction. First pub
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