4.2 Actividad

Actividad 4.2

Patricio, the architect from Chile, is working in Valencia. He has a busy schedule.

1 Read the following e-mail message with his diary, as sent to his secretary. Put the different places listed into the
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2016 The Open University

3.1 Listening to and taking notes from a telephone call

In this section you practise obtaining information on the phone. You describe a relocation site as part of the more detailed research into the advantages of possible locations.

In the next activity you listen to a telephone call between Steve Vance who works for the Reloc agency and an employee of the Commission for New Towns (CNT), an agency whose task is to promote the development of a number of new towns and provide information for companies that wish to relocate.

Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2016 The Open University

2.1 Making a shortlist of locations

Once a company has decided to relocate it needs to research possible locations.

This section considers locations in terms of size, facilities, communications, population and amenities. You will collect information and work on descriptions, summaries and question forms.

The first step in the relocation process is to make a shortlist of locations that match the organisation's needs. This means considering the advantages and disadvantages of each site. Masito Electronics is consideri
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2016 The Open University

The science of nutrition and healthy eating
This free course, The science of nutrition and healthy eating, looks at the science behind nutrition, covering aspects of biology, chemistry and physics as well as giving some insight into healthier eating. Reading food labels, choosing healthier foods, hydrating appropriately and understanding how we taste food will allow you to be more informed about the choices you make about the food you eat.Author(s): Creator not set

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2

4.6 Gender and power in the workplace

Activity 16

0 hours 20 minutes

If you are, or have been, employed in a health and social care service, think about the ways in which gendered power ‘works’ in
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2016 The Open University

3.3 Care: a contested word

You have seen that the words used to label people who are seen as needing care can stigmatise them. By picking them out as unlike ‘normal’ people, people who do not need care, they can feel belittled, de-humanised and deprived of respect. But it is not just the labels like ‘mentally handicapped’, ‘lunatic’ or ‘mentally ill’ that are at issue. ‘Care’ as a word is itself under attack:

The t
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2016 The Open University

2.4.3 abelling

The term ‘informal carer’ is a label. It was coined to describe people who take on unpaid responsibility for the welfare of another person. It is a term which has meaning only when the public world of care provision comes into contact with the private world of the family where caring is a day-to-day, unremarked-upon activity, like reminding a young child to clean her teeth. Labelling yourself as an informal carer requires a major shift in the way you see yourself, a shift neither Arthur n
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2016 The Open University

2.4.2 Duration and frequency

The second complication associated with identifying carers is related to how much caring they do and how often they do it. This aspect came to the fore when carers were first identified in the 1985 General Household Survey, an annual statistical survey carried out by the Office of Population, Censuses and Surveys in the UK (Green, 1988). From answers to a question in the survey which asked if respondents took on ‘extra responsibilities’ for someone who was ‘sick, handicapped or elderly
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2016 The Open University

4.2 People knowledge

Stacey (1994) has made a passionate plea to understand the ‘power of lay knowledge’ which she prefers to call ‘people knowledge’. Stacey claims that two fundamental assumptions underline the importance of listening to lay voices. One is that all people are of equal worth and so their views should be heard. The other is that people are health producers as much as they are health consumers. She maintains that patients do a great deal of hard work, whether it is direct as with labouring
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2016 The Open University

2.4.2 Holism and ideas about the body

Reductionist medical approaches have been criticised for providing a fixed, mechanistic view of the body, which fails to capture the patient's experience. The power associated with biomedical diagnoses and expertise means that patients’ explanations for their illnesses are often overlooked or dismissed. Does holism, which seeks to treat the mind, body and spirit, fare any better in giving patients a sense of control or ownership of what their illness means? This question is often reframed i
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2015 The Open University

3.2 Fossil fuels

So what are the principle energy systems used by humanity at present, and how sustainable are they?

Until quite recently, human energy requirements were modest and our supplies came either from harnessing natural processes such as the growth of plants, which provided wood for heating and food to energise human or animal muscles, or from the power of water and wind, used to drive simple machinery.

But the nineteenth and twentieth centuries saw a massive increase in global energy us
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2016 The Open University

Introduction

The course uses the example of climate change to highlight the dynamic and volatile character of the planet, and how globalisation links together, in often unequal ways, people and places across the world. The course focuses on the potentially momentous impact of global environmental change on Pacific Islands like Tuvalu. It introduces students to geographical ways of thinking about the world.

This OpenLearn course is an adapted extract from the Open University course Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2016 The Open University

3.1 (4A) Exploring dynamic relationships using sign graphs

Here is where things start getting really interesting in terms of system dynamics! So far, most of your modelling work has been pretty static, with a limited sense of how things change over time. In fact, the behaviour of complex systems is rarely stable. Sometimes change is exponential (e.g. the growth of the World Wide Web); sometimes systems crash and burn (e.g. extinction of populations); but often systems demonstrate repetitive patterns of behaviour (e.g. economic boom and bust cycles).
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2016 The Open University

2.7 Representing feedback through system dynamics diagrams

System dynamics diagrams, also sometimes called ‘stock flow’ diagrams, can be derived from causal diagrams, although in some cases it might be easier to start directly with the system dynamics diagramming technique, especially if you need to explore around one particular object’s attribute, such as population number.

System dynamics diagrams are drawn using four symbols: boxes representing attributes or ‘stocks’ of objects (e.g. level of water in a tank); valves representing
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2016 The Open University

2.3 Negative feedback and stability

If positive feedback results in change, then another mechanism must exist that creates stability. This is negative feedback.

What stops water hyacinth from taking over the world? Clearly, it is the lack of tropical freshwater. As the number of water hyacinth reaches the limits of their water body, there is a sudden increase in the death rate as offspring compete for the ever decreasing levels of sunlight. The sudden overcrowding allows the establishment of a negative feed
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2016 The Open University

2.2 Positive feedback and change

Simple positive feedback loops are easily illustrated since they are the mechanism through which anything changes rapidly. Take for example the explosion of water hyacinth when introduced into new environments:

Water hyacinth is a floating plant that has spread from South America to waterways around the world. It can cover the water so completely that it obstructs the movement of boats. Imagine a lake that is 10
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2016 The Open University

Acknowledgements

This free course is adapted from a former Open University course called 'Engineering: mechanics, materials, design (T207).'

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see terms and conditions), this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommerc
Author(s): The Open University

References

Collins, S., Ghey, J. and Mills, G. (1989) The Professional Engineer in Society, London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.
Foster, J., with Corby, L. (illustrator) (1996) How to Get Ideas, San Francisco: Berrett-Koehler Publishers, Inc.
Haaland, J., Wingert, J. and Olson, B. A. (1963) 'Force required to activate switches, maximum finger pushing force, and coefficient
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2016 The Open University

5.1 The development of the bicycle

Section 4 has looked at how we can follow a logical route or map, from the expression of a need, to arrive at possible solutions to a problem. In Sections 5 and 6 we look in more detail at two quite different examples of engineering problems. Our first example is the historical development of the bicycle frame; the second concerns a vital component of a car's airbag system.

The weight of a bicycle frame is a major burden that the cyclist has to bear. There have certainly been times when
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2016 The Open University

Acknowledgements

The following material is Proprietary and is used under licence:

Naughton, J. (1998) ‘Arts: Internet: It's free and it works. No wonder Bill Gates hates it’, Observer, 8 November 1998, © Guardian News and Media Ltd 2005;

Wilkins, E. (1994) ‘Rescued from £1 a day for girl's upkeep’, The Times, 31 January 1994. Copyright © Times Newspapers Ltd 1994;

‘Agency demands 1p from father’, The Times, 22 December 1993. Copyright © Times Newspapers
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2015 The Open University