How Students Learn: History, Mathematics, and Science in the Classroom
How Students Learn: History, Mathematics, and Science in the Classroom builds on the discoveries detailed in the bestselling How People Learn. Now, these findings are presented in a way that teachers can use immediately, to revitalize their work in the classroom for even greater effectiveness. Organized for utility, the book explores how the principles of learning can be applied in teaching history, science, and math topics at three levels: elementary, middle, and high school. Leading educators
Author(s): Committee on How People Learn

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Metadata is copyrighted by the National Academy of Sciences, 2005. NSDL may modify, reformat and redistribute metadata to function within NSDL systems, services and partners. Resource terms of use: Co

Natural Resources, the Environment, and Ecosystems
This collection of teacher guides includes: Ecosystems and Climate, Wildlife - Just One Piece of the Picture, Integrated Pest Management, Soil and Ecosystems, Sustainable Agriculture, and The Web of Life - Understanding Ecosystems. Each guide includes a subject overview, objectives, and student activities. By the end, students should be able to understand the effect of climate on ecosystems; the interrelationships of animals with components of their natural ecosystem; how ecosystems benefit from
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Copyright 2002 The Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois

Fibonacci Numbers and the Pascal Triangle
Offered in English, German, and Serbian, this site is a good introduction to the mathematical concepts of Pascals Triangle, Fibonacci numbers, and the Golden Section. Because it is operated in Yugoslavia, there are occasional grammatical errors in the English version. Nevertheless, the information presented gives a valuable account of the significance of these topics. The content of the site includes historical perspectives (with brief profiles of the mathematicians who originated the ideas) and
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Why Teach Bioethics?
Adolescents are passionately interested in ethical questions suggesting adolescence may be a critical period for including bioethics in science education. Knowledge arises when the mind interacts with content; an understanding of ethical issues develops as an evolving process around real-life situations. The question is what role should teachers play in the acquisition of this knowledge?
Author(s): Carolyn Csongradi

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American Institute of Biological Sciences,http://www.aibs.org/core/copyright.html

Electromagnetic waves
These pages, part of From Stargazers to Starships, explain electromagnetic waves and sunlight. Information inlcudes physiological and spectral color, spectral lines, the electromagnetic field work by Maxwell, the discovery of radio waves by Hertz, and photons and Einsteins relation. Stargazers also has detailed lesson plans accompanying these sections.
Author(s): David P. Stern

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Phy6.org

Sunlight and the Earth : Climate and Weather
These web pages trace the processes involved in the suns impact on weather. This is an exploration of the importance of radiation and reflection of light, both visible and infra-red, and the greenhouse effect. Convection and the role of water vapor are also considered. Global-scale air flows are described, explaining why wind in the continental US usually blows from the west, while near the equator it comes from the east.
Author(s): David P. Stern

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Phy6.org

Illuminations, National Council of Teachers of Mathematics Vision for School Mathematics
The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics Illuminations Web site is designed to illuminate the new vision for school mathematics as presented in NCTM s Principles and Standards for School Mathematics. The site provides online esources that will help improve the teaching and learning of mathematics for all students, from pre-school through high school.
Author(s): NCTM

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2009, National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. All Content included on this site, such as text, graphics, logos, button icons, images, applets, video and audio clips, and software, is the property

Observe an exploded star at different wavelengths
This Earth science resource enables students to observe and compare the appearance of the Crab Nebula under different wavelengths. The introduction explains how the nebula is the remains of an exploded star (supernova). It also reveals how temperature variations in the nebula are detected by different wavelengths. Students are instructed to move the cursor across the spectrum to see images of the nebula captured using radio and microwaves; infrared, visible, and ultraviolet light; and gamma rays
Author(s): TERC. Center for Earth and Space Science Education

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The future of energy, consumption
The consumption of energy is increasing at an ever-rising rate. This informational piece, part of a series about the future of energy, introduces students to the increasing energy demands of the nation and world. The article defines consumption for the students and discusses energy conservation. Students read that much of their energy consumption is shown to be energy wants, not necessarily energy needs. Thought-provoking questions afford students chances to reflect on what they've read about th
Author(s): Iowa Public Television. Explore More Project

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Copyright 2004, Iowa Public Television.

Observe common objects made of minerals
This interactive Earth science resource lets students first see six images of minerals and then, by placing their cursor over each image, an image of an everyday object made from that mineral. Quartz, gypsum, and fluorite are among the minerals shown, with the corresponding familiar objects being glass, drywall (Sheetrock), and toothpaste. Copyright 2005 Eisenhower National Clearinghouse
Author(s): TERC. Center for Earth and Space Science Education

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Hubble info circuit : follow the path to and from Hubble
This diagram illustrates and describes the steps involved in sending directions to the Hubble Space Telescope, collecting and processing the data collected by Hubble, and delivering the requested data and images back to a scientist on Earth. When users roll over each of the six entities depicted in this sequence, they can read about that entity's involvement in this two-way process. Arrows document the flow of information between entities such as the Space Telescope Sky Institute, the Goddard Sp
Author(s): Exploratorium

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Copyright 2001 The Exploratorium.

Fossil Fuels
How much does the United States depend on fossil fuels? This web page, part of a site on the future of energy, introduces students to fossil fuels as an energy source. Here students read about the uses, benefits, and limitations of fossil fuels. There is also information on how these fuels are distributed geographically and how they affect the U.S. economy through supply and demand. Thought-provoking questions afford students opportunities to reflect on what they've read. Articles about clean co
Author(s): Iowa Public Television. Explore More Project

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Copyright 2004, Iowa Public Television.

Ocean Temperatures
In this lesson students discover that measurements from space can tell us the temperature of the ocean, both on an annual average and as measured on any given date. For the annual average the highest ocean temperatures are near the equator, and drop as one moves either northward or southward from the equator. Students will graph each temperature value as a function of latitude and write a linear equation that best fits the points on their graph. They can choose as data points any point at that a
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Activities are Copyright Rice University, however may be freely copied for educational use so long as headers are not changed. Teachers are encouraged to register using the registration facility so th

Etymologies of Algebra, Geometry, Trigonometry
What are the origins and roots of the words geometry, algebra, and trigonometry?
Author(s): Math Forum,Nikki

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Once in a million years : teaching geologic time
This article outlines effective pedagogical approaches to teaching geologic time and describes common student preconceptions and misconceptions as well as several student centered activities that assist students in conceptual change.
Author(s): Kristen Lampe,Andrew Lloyd,Susan Lewis

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American Institute of Biological Sciences

Compare Human-made Objects with Natural Objects
In small groups, students will experiment and observe the similarities and differences between human-made objects and nature. The students will compare the function and structure of hollow bones with drinking straws, bird beaks, tool pliers, bat wings and airplane wings. A classroom discussion can be held to discuss similarities and differences that were observed along with follow up assessment activities such as journal writing and Venn diagrams.
Author(s): Center for Engineering Educational Outreach,

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Copyright 2011 - Center for Engineering Educational Outreach, Tufts University,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

GoNU.TV Game Recap - Baseball vs. Boston College - March 29, 2011
The Northeastern University baseball team defeated the Boston College Eagles in an extra inning affair Tuesday afternoon, claiming a 2-1 victory at Friedman Diamond in Brookline, Mass.
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Radiation from Japan reaches B.C. shores
March 28, 2011 Simon Fraser University researchers are attributing increased levels of the radioisotope iodine-131 in B.C. seaweed and rainwater samples to the Fukushima Dai-Ichi nuclear reactor situation in Japan. See also http://at.sfu.ca/SjllyC
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Can You Catch the Water?
Students construct a three-dimensional model of a water catchment basin using everyday objects to create hills, mountains, valleys and water sources. They experiment to see where rain travels and collects, and survey water pathways to see how they can be altered by natural and human-made activities. Students discuss how engineers design structures that impact water collection, and systems that clean and distribute water.
Author(s): Integrated Teaching and Learning Program,

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Copyright 2009 - Integrated Teaching and Learning Program, College of Engineering, University of Colorado at Boulder,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

Engineering for the Three Little Pigs
The purpose of this activity is to demonstrate the importance of rocks, soils and minerals in engineering and how using the right material for the right job is important. The students build three different sand castles and test them for strength and resistance to weathering. Then, they discuss how the buildings are different and what engineers need to think about when using rocks, soils and minerals for construction.
Author(s): Integrated Teaching and Learning Program,

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Copyright 2011 - Integrated Teaching and Learning Program, College of Engineering, University of Colorado at Boulder,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php