2.5 Léxico básico

alto tall, high
animado lively
campanario (el) bell tower
casco viejo (el)/casco antiguo (el) old quarter
catedral (la) cathedral
estación (de tren) (la) (railway) station
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1.2 Habitudes et projets

What do people normally do on 14 July? And this year, will they all enjoy the celebrations or will some of them have good reasons for not getting involved?

Activité 5 LE QUATORZE JUILLET 11:17–15:30

1 Regardez la séquence
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Text

Texto 2: D’Andrea Mohr, J.L. (1984), adapted from the report Nunca más. Comisión Nacional sobre la Desaparición de Pe
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1. Join the 200,000 stud
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3.2 Asking for and giving information on the telephone

Here are some common phrases that people use when telephoning:

Giving the reason for a call

  • I'm phoning for some information on ...

  • I'd like some more detailed material ...

  • I'd like to meet someone from CNT ...

  • I need some information ...

  • I need to talk to an accountant.

Making requests

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2.7.1 Les musées d'Avignon

In this session, you decide to visit one of the museums in Avignon.

Key Learning Points

  • Telling the time

  • Buying tickets

  • Paying for goods and services

Activité 32


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2.1.1 Activité 8

1. In Extract 43 you heard some of the language you will need to book a hotel room. Match the French with the English.

Trouvez les équivalents.


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1.1 Autour d'Avignon

In this session, you and and your friend Christine are exploring Avignon. You look at the town plan opposite the station, and Christine stops a passer-by to ask for help.

Key Learning Points

  • Asking for and understanding directions

  • Using être

  • Making liaisons

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From sound to meaning: hearing, speech and language
Human communication is vastly more complex than that of any other species we know about. It is so complex that linguists are only just beginning to identify the processes in the brain that are related to understanding language. This unit looks at how language is understood by taking an interdisciplinary approach. First published on Thu, 22 Mar 2
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The science behind wheeled sports
This unit focuses on cycling and wheelchair racing: what we might collectively call 'wheeled sports'. The Scientific concepts such as force, acceleration and speed are also useful for understanding these sports. However, cycling and wheelchair racing differ from the sports you have studied so far in that technology more obviously plays an important role.Author(s): Creator not set

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5.2 Technologies of help?

Click view document to read: Technology, Selfhood and Physical Disabilty

View document66.4KB PD
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2.7.5 Identities are negotiated

In constructing their identities, people can only draw on terms that are available in society at that time, which have meanings and associations attached. However, people may attribute different meanings and importance to those labels. This means people always negotiate their identities, in the context of the different meanings attached to them.

Taking this view of identity, as a social process that people engage in, rather than as a fixed essence inside them, is not to deny that partic
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3 Welfare

Earlier, in Activity 1, some contrasting associations with the word ‘welfare’ emerged. Just to remind you, they were:

Positive: concern, happiness, prosperity, wellbeing, success, profit, support, safety-net, sharing, goodwill, concern, benefit, provision.

Negative: needy, failing, controlling, labelling, deserving, denying, official, not managing, stigma, shame, poverty, idleness, fecklessness, scrounging, hand-outs, charity, demeaning, benefits.

From one
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2 Community

As you've just seen, ‘community’, an ever present word, evokes some contrasting meanings. It has been described as a ‘keyword’, that is, a word which has its own particular history but which also plays a significant role in putting across different meanings. Identifying a keyword is to go further than just giving a dictionary definition because:

Keywords have been more than ways of seeing: they have been influe
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1 What's in a title? An introduction

Because the words ‘care’, ‘welfare’ and ‘community’ are so much a part of everyday language and debate, there's perhaps an assumption that people agree about what they each mean. These are three words that mostly evoke warm and positive feelings. In Activity 1 you're asked to think about opposite points of view.

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2.2 1 Social Darwinism and eugenics

Nineteenth century reformers combined their new medical diagnoses with a concern to tackle what they saw as the social causes of cruelty and incapacity. Two theories dominated: social Darwinism and eugenics.

Social Darwinism drew on Darwin's ideas of natural selection and emphasised the contribution of the fittest and most superior individuals to the survival of the human species. The social Darwinists, who included some of the most prominent thinkers of their time, believed that social
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Grateful acknowledgement is made to the following sources for permission to use material:

Illustrations: pp 10,14, 19, 21: Brenda Prince/Format; p19 (top): Sally and Richard Greenhill.

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1.4.2 Racism

You may want to question whether the term ‘sexism’ is a useful one to help understand the Beveridge vision, but you can probably agree that there is an idea about the family and about the ‘natural’ responsibility of women to do caring work that kept caring off the public agenda. But this still leaves the theme of ‘racism’ and the idea of the ‘nation’. You caught a glimpse of the importance of this a little earlier in Beveridge's confident remark about women having duties to en
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1.2.3 Did Beveridge wear blinkers?

Activity 2: Who isn't mentioned?

0 hours 10 minutes

Jacobs singled out several groups who were not covered by the insurance scheme. They include:

    <
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1.2.2 Problems with implementation

Writing a report is one thing – getting it implemented as policy is another. In the full version of An Introduction to the Beveridge Report, Jacobs (1992a) makes clear that there were a number of departures from the blueprint when the Labour government came to steering the legislation through parliament. One was a move to greater generosity. The report had recommended that the new pensions should be phased in over a period of 20 years to allow people to build up their contributions.
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