8.1.1 Visibility

Recall that a key usability design feature identified by Donald Norman – from his analysis of using everyday objects such as doors – was visibility. An everyday object such as a door, or a control such as a button on a product should appear to be obvious about how it is used, and indeed it should perform that obvious function. For example, is it obvious how you insert a disc into a player? Is it obvious how you switch the machine on, adjust volume, and so on?


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The Civil War Battles
This video is accompanied by text. "With the beginning of the war still fresh in their minds, and expectations that fighting would be intense but short, Union troops were eager for action. Cries of “On to Richmond” echoed across the hills surrounding Washington as the troops advanced on Confederate forces near Bull Run, approximately 30 miles southwest of the northern capital. President Lincoln believed an attack on a smaller Confederate unit would boost morale and clear a path to Richmond,
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Chris Brown named as asault suspect
Grammy-winning R&B singer Chris Brown named by Las Vegas police as a suspect after a man is punched during a basketball game. Paul Chapman reports. Subscribe: http://smarturl.it/reuterssubscribe More updates and breaking news: http://smarturl.it/BreakingNews Reuters tells the world's stories like no one else. As the largest international multimedia news provider, Reuters provides coverage around the globe and across topics including business, financial, national, and international news. For ov
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Introduction

Accessibility to eLearning for disabled students is a topic which could be included in any area of the curriculum. Most education professionals are aware that they should consider it, but are unsure of what it means, and how to make their eLearning materials accessible to students with a range of disabilities. This free course addresses that need.

If you are interested in this topic, The Open University offers an Author(s): The Open University

7.1 Overview

Scottish literature is defined as literature written in Scotland or by Scottish writers, but is there such a thing as a literary and cultural identity which is distinctively Scottish?

This section of the OpenLearn Scotland collection is designed to stimulate thinking on the relationship between writing and identity. Learners are introduced to the work of two enormously influential figures in Scottish literature and culture: Sorley MacLean and Jackie Kay, the contemporary Scottish poet a
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Girodet, The Sleep of Endymion, 1791
NOTE: Front Male Nudity. Anne-Louis Girodet de Roussy-Trioson, The Sleep of Endymion, 1791, oil on canvas, 1.98 x 2.61m (6 feet 5-¾ inches x 8 feet 6-¾ inches), exhibited in the salons of 1793 and 1814 (Musée du Louvre, Paris) (02:49) Speakers: Drs. Beth Harris and Steven Zucker
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2.2 Describing positions along a line

To take a definite case, consider a car moving along a straight horizontal road. The car can be modelled as a particle by supposing the particle to be located at, say, the midpoint of the car. It is clearly convenient to measure the progress of the car with respect to the road, and for this purpose you might use the set of uniformly spaced red-topped posts along the right-hand side of the road (see Figure 5). The posts provide a way of assigning a unique position coordinate to the car
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Civil War: Gettysburg: The Story of an Unsung Hero
Find out how the actions of a former Maine professor helped the Union win at Gettysburg, the deadliest battle of the Civil War. This decision to attack turned the battle and resulted in the Alabama troops retreating as the Maine troops advanced on them without any ammunition.

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7.4 Patterns

While frameworks and components focus on the reuse of previously developed software, patterns focus on the reuse of expertise. A pattern is a general solution to problem; it is the result of abstracting what is common practice in solving a set of similar problems.

Patterns became a significant topic during the 1990s within an object community disappointed with the low level of reuse being achieved. Instead of concentrating on yet more new methods, the patterns movement looked at
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Creating Harmonies on National Kazoo Day
The Trumpet Ensemble at Texas Tech University put away their horns and played the fight song with a kazoo.
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History of Homelessness
John Foran, Praxis Housing CEO delivers a speech about the History of homelessness during a fund raiser at the West Point Club. (08:14)
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6.1 Controlling things

As you learned in Section 1, computers can collect, process, store and distribute information. This section shows that they can also be used to:

  • control machines and simple mechanisms;

  • conduct a special kind of commerce: selling on the web.

Let us examine more closely that common household appliance, the automatic washing machine. Virtually all such machines sold in the last decade or so are controlled using a microcomput
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1.2.1 What evidence are we reading?

Although we live in a society where a huge amount of information is available in the form of numbers, some of us still feel a mental fog descend when we are asked to deal with them. This is because numerical information is information in a very condensed and abstract form. A number on its own means very little. You have to learn to read it. Numeracy (the ability to work with numbers) is a skill that we can learn. It is a very useful skill, because it allows us to understand very quickly the <
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6.2.2 Representing visual and symbolic texts

We saw that when you discuss your judgements of a visual text such as the landscape painting or The Madonna and Child, you talk about its ‘composition’: the way the ‘picture space’ is organised; the relationships between ‘foreground’ and ‘background’, and between ‘figures’. You discuss the way ‘perspective’ is used in the painting to show ‘depth’; the painting's tonal range’, and its uses of ‘colour’, ‘shape’, ‘line’; ‘light’ and ‘shade
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Repatriation and returning remains
19th Century philosopher Jeremy Bentham allowed his body to be put on public display after he passed on but would you allow your body to be displayed after you die? The following video and audio collection examines specific cases in which the issue of display and ownership are raised and explores how museums have handled this question. Experts share reasons for their beliefs regarding repatriation and refer to specific examples on the topic of whether remains should be returned to their country
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Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2

3.3.1 The human perceptual system

In order to survive, all living things have evolved some sort of ability to sense or perceive the world around them. Even the humble amoeba is sensitive to light. Complex animals have intricate perceptual systems that respond to many different features of their environment – insects, despite their impressive eyes, are most sensitive to trails of chemicals; bats are blind to light but responsive to sonar pulses; dogs and pigs depend more on smell than vision for sensing the world.

We w
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Mulching Your Garden With Newspaper and Cocoa
In this video, Garden Girl, Patti Moreno, demonstrates how to mulch your garden with newspaper and cocoa shell mulch (1:29).
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Acknowledgements

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see terms and conditions), this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence

Grateful acknowledgement is made to the following sources for permission to reproduce material in this unit:


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Except for third party materials and/or otherwise stated (see terms and conditions) the content in OpenLearn is released for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share

The European Union at the Crossroads: Brexit and after [Audio]
Speaker(s): Professor Lord Giddens, Axelle Lemaire, Professor Margaret MacMillan | With the UK heading for Brexit, the European Union faces a historic challenge but also an opportunity to rethink its own future. Join diplomats, politicians and academics from across the continent to debate the future of Europe. Tony Giddens is a member of the House of Lords and former LSE Director. Axelle Lemaire (@axellelemaire) is the French Minister of State for the Digital Sector and Innovation. Margaret MacM
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Introduction

Inspired by the Scientific Revolution of the seventeenth century, the intellectuals of eighteenth-century Europe launched a dazzling programme for the extension of knowledge and for the promotion of human welfare. Their programme has become known as the ‘Enlightenment’ and their age is often called the ‘Age of Enlightenment’.

This unit is concerned with science in Scotland, one of the most dynamic centres of Enlightenment thinking. Writers speak of the mid-eighteenth century as
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