References

Hughes, M. (1991) Closing the Learning Gap, Network Educational Press Ltd.
Lucas, W. (2001) Power Up Your Mind, Nicholas Brearley Publishing.
Rose, C. (1985) Accelerated Learning, Accelerated Learning Systems Ltd.
UNESCO (1977) Suggestive, accelerative learning and teaching: A manual of classroom procedures base
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3. Review and recall

Learning cannot take place without memory, and we expect our students to be able to process, synthesise and recall a vast amount of information every day. There are, however, some simple strategies that we can employ to help them to do this.

Firstly consider the natural concentration span. A rough guide is that concentration span in minutes is equivalent to chronological age in years, +/− 2 minutes. That means that even our most attentive 18 year olds need a short concentration break
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References

Bush T. and Middlewood D. (1997) Managing People in Education, Paul Chapman, London, p. 172.
The Education (School Teacher Appraisal) (England) Regulations 2000
DfES/Ofsted 2005, A New Relationship with Schools: Next Steps.

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1.3 Concern over falling standards: a policy for the ‘90s

There followed a number of reports from the Scottish Education Office to schools offering guidance in developing particular aspects of the curriculum. These culminated in a consultative paper Curriculum and Assessment in Scotland: a policy for the ‘90s (SED, 1987) which identified apparent poor practice in school curricular policy-making, lack of continuity in the school curriculum, lack of challenge for students in Years 6 and 7 of primary schools, lack of consistency in the practic
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4.1 Sources of material

You will probably be making an OER in an area in which you have some expertise so you are likely to already have lesson plans and resources that you use in your face-to-face work that will be invaluable to others.

As well as your own materials, you might like to look at a range of other OER repositories in addition to OpenLearn.

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Introduction

This unit looks at the pedagogical issues involved in the creation and selection of self-study educational resources for a set of intended learning outcomes as exemplified here on OpenLearn. It is a unit about writing a unit. Although it considers the way that people at The Open University set about writing open-learning materials, it will not focus specifically on the University’s particular production system. Nor does it look deeply at the technical issues involved in producing certain ty
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Acknowledgements

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Author details

Sue Platt has been a school governor for 21 years, at both primary and sec
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1.4.1 Global science in the classroom

Other cultures have had flourishing examples of science that should be much more widely known by pupils… Pupils can be helped to see that science is a cultural activity, and it is inevitably the case that different cultures produce different sciences.

Reiss (2000) p. 17

There are many ways of helping students appreciate that science is a global pursuit.

In Activity 4 you are asked t
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Learning outcomes

The learning outcomes for this unit are to:

  • engage in a number of activities that involve visualisation and learn from your own experiences what it means;

  • learn the views of a well-known mathematics educator talking about visualisation and find out how your views compare with those of some other secondary-school mathematics teachers;

  • learn some ways that visualising could be incorporated into your classroom and consider a number of resources that mi
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3.3 Responding to these initiatives

A key implication of both initiatives is greater interagency working, which necessitates more engagement of school staff with other professionals.

The DfES notes in Extended Schools: Providing Opportunities and Services for all that schools will need to work in partnership with other groups and agencies to enable:

  • more diverse activities that involve parents, community members and local groups;

  • a ‘joined-up’ approach
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Acknowledgements

Author Details

Professor David Lambert is Chief Executive of the Geographical but remains Research Associate of the Institute of Education (London). He is a former secondary geography teacher (for 12 years) and developed a scholarly interest in assessment issues following the introduction of the national curriculum. He also has a research interest in the way teachers select and use textbooks with pupils. He has a long-standing concern with mo
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2 The subject discipline

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