References

American College of Sports Medicine (2006) ACSM's Guidelines for Exercise Testing and Prescription (7th edn), London, Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins.
Pollock, M.L., Gaesser, G.A., Butcher, J.D., Després, J.P., Dishman, R.K., Franklin, B.A. and Ewing Garber, C. (1998) ‘ACSM position stand: The recommended quantity and quality of exercise for developing and maintaining cardiorespiratory and muscular fitness, a
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3.2.1 Try some yourself

Activity 37

The Myth of Millionaire Tax Flight: how place still matters for the rich [Audio]
Speaker(s): Dr Cristobal Young, Ed Miliband MP, Dr Andrew Summers | If taxes rise, will they leave? In his new book, Cristobal Young publishes the findings from the first-ever large-scale study of migration of the world's richest individuals, drawing on special access to over 45mil US tax returns, together with Forbes rich lists. He shows that contrary to popular opinion, although the rich have the resources and capacity to flee high-tax places, their actual migration is surprisingly limited. Pl
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Keep on learning

Study another free course

There are more than 800 courses on OpenLearn for you to c
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5 Improving own learning and performance

A main purpose of this assessment course is to help you improve your learning and performance as you pursue your main area of study or work. It involves identifying an aspect of your learning you want to work on and using skills to help you improve your learning and performance. For example, you may want to concentrate on note taking and improving your time management skills as you study, or you may find you need to learn new IT skills and information search skills at work.

The evidence
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6.3.2 Stage 2 Create a mind map

Now you need to think about grouping the ideas, creating a flow for your assignment.

We started by grouping together our ideas and material for the essay on the possible advantages of being a mature student. This helped us to create a mind-map by seeing where links could be made and so made it much easier to decide where the weight of evidence was taking our argument (Author(s): The Open University

15.301 Managerial Psychology Laboratory (MIT)
We function in our personal and professional lives based on knowledge and intuitions. Our intuition that we know a lot is very powerful. But sometimes intuitions are accurate and sometimes they are not; without research, it is hard to tell. This course combines a few different goals: develop a critical eye for making inferences from data; be able to carry out simple data analysis; learn about managerial psychology; develop interesting new questions about managerial psychology and test these ques
Author(s): Ariely, Dan

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2.6.1 The phenomenological perspective

The term ‘phenomenology’ is a good example of polysemy, as it has different meanings according to the academic context in which it is found. There are scientific phenomenology and philosophical phenomenology, for example, and the sociologists Ken Thompson and Kath Woodward describe phenomenology as, ‘The development in sociology of a philosophical approach which focuses on people’s consciousness of their experiences and how they interpret the world; the meaning it has for them’ (Tho
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2.3.4 Using ‘quel’, ‘quelle’

You have already come across the following question:

  • Quelle est la date de votre anniversaire?

Quel means ‘what’ or ‘which’. It changes to quelle if the noun that it is linked to is feminine.


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Metric spaces and continuity
This free course contains an introduction to metric spaces and continuity. The key idea is to use three particular properties of the Euclidean distance as the basis for defining what is meant by a general distance function, a metric. Section 1 introduces the idea of a metric space and shows how this concept allows us to generalise the notion of continuity. Section 2 develops the idea of sequences and convergence in metric spaces. Section 3 builds on the ideas from the first two sections to formu
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4.2.5 Adverbs

Adverbs modify verbs, adjectives and other adverbs, for example runningquickly, veryclever, quitewell.

Adverbs of manner describe how the action of the verb is being done, for example boldly, graciously, well.

Adverbs of time show when the action of the verb is taking place, for example today, then.

Adverbs of place show where the action of the verb is taking place, for example here.
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2.4 Drawing circles

Drawing circles freehand often produces very uncircle-like shapes! If you need a reasonable circle, you could draw round a circular object, but if you need to draw an accurate circle with a particular radius, you will need a pair of compasses and a ruler. Using the ruler, set the distance between the point of the compasses and the tip of the pencil at the desired radius; place the point on the paper at the position where you want the centre of the circle to be and carefully rotate the compass
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References

Broham, J. (1996) ‘Postwar development in the Asian NICs: does the neoliberal model fit reality?’, Economic Geography, vol.72, pp. 107–30.
Castree, N., Coe, N.M., Ward, K. and Samers, M. (2004) Spaces of Work: Global Capitalism and Geographies of Labour, London, Sage.

Learning outcomes

After studying this course, you should be able to:

  • explain the main characteristics of ‘sweatshops’, and their presence in today's system of globalised production

  • set out the arguments for and against overseas sweatshop exploitation

  • consider how far the consumption of cheap branded goods makes consumers responsible for the conditions under which they are made

  • show how consumers are distanced from overseas sweatshop exploitation, a
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Acknowledgements

The content acknowledged below is Proprietary (see terms and conditions) and is used under licence.

Grateful acknowledgement is made to the following sources for permission to use material:

Course image: Sorin Mutu in Flickr made available under
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6.1 Introduction

The international level can be viewed as an arena of politics in its own right and not just as a context for states and other actors. If we think of the international world in this way, how should relations between states, and other actors on the international stage, be constructed? To what extent should those relations be regulated? We can ask whether relations between states, and states' policy making, should be dictated by allegedly universally shared human rights principles, or by other o
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Engineering small worlds: micro and nano technologies
How do you see the invisible? Today, mechanical, electrical, chemical and biological engineering of ‘small worlds’ is revolutionising our lives. Atomic Force Microscopes are an important tool when creating engineering solutions on the micro and nano scale. The 4 video tracks on this album examine the AFM's engineering and operation, explain how it can be adapted for a wide range of applications and describe its use in the life sciences and semiconductor industries. This material forms part o
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Tackling noise pollution
Noise is one of the forms of pollution that characterises industrial societies. Many forms of noise in the urban environment, including traffic and aircraft noise, can cause significant harm in varying degrees. So just how much noise are you exposed to? The tracks in this album explain the measurement and control of noise and look at how motor engineers and road researchers are trying to cut down on noise pollution from transport. Lastly, two audio tracks featuring Dr Shahram Taherzadeh and Dr S
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Ebusiness technologies: foundations and practice
Major retailers today face a major challenge to manage and distribute goods from suppliers around the world. What systems enable big business to keep in touch with latest sales information from their stores? How are Internet and Web technologies and their associated applications used in practice? This album explores how these technologies are changing the way businesses operate internally and externally. The seven video tracks examine a Tesco supply chain and present an insider's view of web ser
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Water Treatment
Do you think about where your water comes from? In the UK each of us uses an average of about 150 litres of water per day! The seven video tracks in this album consider issues of demand and quality in water supply as well as treatment processes. They give information on methods of minimising waste, emergency water treatment and effluent control. This material forms part of T308 Environmental monitoring, modelling and control.Author(s): The OpenLearn team

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Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2