Joan of Arc: Dressed as a Man
Joan of Arc cropped her hair, wore men's clothing and remained a virgin, gaining mythical status among her followers. Prince Charles, the crowned Prince of France, lost his claim to the throne because his mother, the Queen of France, implied that he is illegitimate. When Joan of Arc requested an audience with the Prince, Charles claimed that Joan revealed information to him that only God or a messenger of God would know. In this video clip, learn more about Joan of Arc. (2:08)
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Marie Curie Actions: Chemical Party
This is a funny video made to promote chemistry.  It features funny characters that act as elements that have different interactions.  It was directed by Roderick Fenske.  (01:31)
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Egyptian Collection at the Pitt Rivers Museum
Colloquia Week 4 HT11: Egyptian Collection at the Pitt Rivers Museum.
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5 Después de todo

Mire todo el reportaje de nuevo y fíjese qué temas de la vida y de la cultura argentina están representados en el mural de La Boca. Luego haga una lista de los mismos. Fíjese en:

  • El diálogo del grupo de artistas en el café La Perla.

  • Las explicaciones de Cristina.

  • Las opiniones de los/las transeüntes.

Las siguientes fotos pueden ayudarle:

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Copyright © 2016 The Open University

7 Solutions to the exercises

Section 6 contains solutions to the exercises that appear throughout sections 1-5.

Click 'View document' below to open the solutions (13 pages, 232KB).

2.3.1 Try some yourself

1 Write the following as one number to a single power:

  • (a) 23 × 24

  • (b) 32 × 34

  • (c) 42 × 43 × 44<
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2.1 The impact of a power

Here is a tale based on an ancient Eastern legend, which gives an idea of the impact of raising a number to a power.

Example 6

A long time ago there lived a very rich king whose son's life was saved by a poor old beggar woman. The king was naturally very grateful to the woman, so he offered to
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1.2.1 Try some yourself

1 Without using your calculator, find the following:

  • (a) 102

  • (b) 1002

  • (c) 0.12

  • (d) 0.012

  • (e)
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1.1.1 Try some yourself

1 Evaluate the following:

  • (a) 62

  • (b) 0.52

  • (c) 1.52

Answer<
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1 Modelling static problems

The main teaching text of this unit is provided in the workbook below. The answers to the exercises that you'll find throughout the workbook are given in the answer book. You can access it by clicking on the link under the workbook. Once you have completed the workbook and exercises return to this page and watch the video below, ‘The arch never sleeps’, which discusses a practical application of some of the ideas in workbook.

Click 'View document' to open the workbook (PDF, 0.8
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Introduction

This unit extends the ideas introduced in the unit on first-order differential equations to a particular type of second-order differential equation which has a variety of applications. The unit assumes that you have previously had a basic grounding in calculus, know something about first-order differential equations and have some familiarity with complex numbers.

This unit is an adapted extract from the course Author(s): The Open University

Introduction

This unit is aimed at teachers who wish to review how they go about the practice of teaching maths, those who are considering becoming maths teachers, or those who are studying maths courses and would like to understand more about the teaching process.

This unit is from our archive and is an adapted extract from Teaching mathematical thinking at Key Stage 3 (ME624) which is no longer taught by The Open University. If you want to study formally with us, you may wish to explore other cour
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1.5.5 Social bookmarks

If you find you have a long unmanageable list of favourites/bookmarks you might like to try social bookmarks as an alternative.

Activity – what you need to know about social bookmarks

Read 7 things you should know about soci
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1.5.2 Ways of organising yourself

How do you organise yourself?

Activity

Make a note of how you organise your:

  • emails

  • internet bookmarks or favorites

  • computer files

  • your
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1.4.4 O is for Objectivity

One of the characteristics of ‘good’ information is that it should be balanced and present both sides of an argument or issue. This way the reader is left to weigh up the evidence and make a decision. In reality, we recognise that no information is truly objective.

This means that the onus is on you, the reader, to develop a critical awareness of the positions represented in what you read, and to take account of this when you interpret the information. In some cases, authors may be
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4.2 Carbon reduction targets

Let's now look at carbon footprint reduction targets in a bit more detail.

The first international agreement to set carbon reduction targets was the 1997 United Nations Kyoto Protocol, which requires developed countries to reduce their human-generated greenhouse gas emissions by an average of just over 5% on 1990 levels by 2008 to 2012. By the time the treaty came into force in 2005, only the USA and Australia had refused to sign. (A new Australian government finally signe
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2.5 A ‘collective picture of a warming world’

The observed increase in GMST may be the key global indicator of greenhouse warming, but it is far from being the only tangible sign of climate change during the 20th century. This brings us back to the first bullet point at the beginning of Section 2.1. Here, we take a brief look at the growing body of evidence that many different climate variables, as well as physical and biological systems around the world, have been affected by recent climate warming. The examples collected in Box 9 will
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Introduction

Sweatshops and the exploitation of workers are often linked to the globalised production of ‘big brand’ labels. This unit examines how campaigners have successfully closed the distance between the brands and the sweatshops, while others argue that such production ‘kick starts’ economies into growth benefiting whole communities.

This unit is an adapted extract from the Open University course Author(s): The Open University

3.3 Nuclear energy

Nuclear energy is based on harnessing the very large quantities of energy that are released when the nuclei of certain atoms, notably uranium-235 and plutonium-239, are induced to split or ‘fission’. The complete fission of a kilogram of uranium-235 should produce, in principle, as much energy as the combustion of over 3000 tonnes of coal. In practice, the fission is incomplete and there are other losses, but nevertheless nuclear fuels are more highly concentrated sources of energy than f
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2.2.2 Environmental economics and green consumerism

In economic terms, green consumerism is typically expressed using measures based on the willingness to pay (WTP) principle. As mentioned above, this takes two main forms: eco-taxation, in which environmental costs are estimated and added to the price of commodities (e.g. vehicles with high carbon emissions); and eco-labelling, in which products are labelled with relevant environmental information, such as is now required by the food industry and governments in many industrialised count
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