1.1 Hints before you start

Each section of this course requires you to follow a series of instructions such as:

SELECT the Independent Variable”

CLICK HERE to continue”

CLICK on the highlighted columns to explore what they mean”

When action is required from you, it will appear underlined and in bold.

Each activity should take approximately 20 minutes to complete. Here is a summary of the activities in this course:

Activity 1: How t
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5 Plotlines – what's your story?

Planning is important not only to the success of a lesson but also to the final outcome. Without a clear idea of ‘what, who, why and how’, your project might lose the plot!

Storyboarding is an essential part of film-making. At this planning stage, it is important to examine your initial idea in detail.

  • What ideas do you want to communicate?

  • Who is your audience?

  • Why: what response do
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6.2.3 Employers' organisations

The main employers' organisations are the CBI (click on the link and then go to ‘policy work’ and on to issues of employment policy) and the IoD , where, again, the focus is on issues affecting the business side of employment and work.


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4. Balloon debate

Another statement from a 14 year-old student:

‘I don't want to do art – it's rubbish’

In addressing such a straight dismissal it is naturally worth considering the student's prior learning experiences, aptitudes and influences. However, this perception nevertheless encodes a declaration of value, which is not fundamentally different to some of the earlier quotes explored. It is perhaps unsurprising that negative perceptions voiced by policy makers, government figures and tho
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4.2 Knowing mathematics

How much mathematics do you think you know? You may feel that you know quite a lot, or that you are ‘out of practice’ and have forgotten much of it; or perhaps you were never very secure in your mathematical knowledge and feel that you did not achieve complete understanding. Primary teachers are expected to have a confident knowledge of mathematics. You are not expected to reach such a level for this course, but you do need to know a fair amount. All the mathematics that children go on to
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2.6 Context and language variation

As well as contributing to meaning, context can also influence the actual words and sentences that we use. Do you sometimes say ‘Hi’ and at other times say ‘Good morning’? Do you have a ‘telephone voice’? This variation in language may be done deliberately, but often it is not. There are two main reasons as to why we adjust the way we speak:

  • to fit in with our audience or what we feel they expect of us; you may use ‘professional’ langua
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References

Blatchford, P., Russell, A. and Webster, R. (2012) Reassessing the Impact of Teaching Assistants: how research challenges practice and policy, London, Routledge.
Colloby, J. (2013) ‘Support in a mathematics lesson’, in Hancock, R., Collins, J. and Stacey, M. (eds), Primary Teaching Assistants: Learners and learning, Abingdon, Routledge/Milton Keynes, The Ope
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Learning outcomes

After studying this course, you should be able to:

  • be able to discuss how the UK’s teaching assistant workforce came into being

  • be developing your understanding that teaching assistants are part of a wider assistant workforce in the public services of health, social services and education

  • have insights into the diverse roles and distinctive contributions of teaching assistants across the UK

  • be able to identify some of the skills tha
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8 24!

This section aims to show you how daily routine changes from one culture to another.

Activity 31 Routine in the United Kingdom

You should allow 10 minutes

Make some notes on the
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4.9 The revival of gender essentialism

After falling out of fashion in the wake of feminist influence in the 1970s and 1980s, there are signs that the notion of ‘essential’ gender differences is undergoing a revival. At an academic level, this has been stimulated by work within genetics, evolutionary psychology and neurology (see Baron-Cohen, 2003). At a more popular level, self-help manuals which apparently ‘explain’ the differences between men's and women's behaviours, and offer advice on coping with them, have become hu
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2.6 Reflecting on identity

Activity 3

0 hours 20 minutes

How would you describe your identity or identities? What kind of words would you use to describe yourself in terms of:

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2.5 ‘Difference’ and identity

If differences on the basis of gender, ethnicity and disability are socially constructed, how should people view their identities, for example as men, or disabled people, or people of African–Caribbean origin? Where do such identities come from, and how useful are they in explaining people's experience of communication in care services?

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2.4 The social construction of ‘difference’

Social constructionists take issue with psychological accounts of human behaviour, criticising them for making universal generalisations and for having too great a focus on the individual. By contrast, a social constructionist approach sees behaviour as shaped by social context, and by issues of power and knowledge.

Those arguing from a critical social perspective would criticise essentialist accounts of difference for several reasons. First, they would argue that there is a danger of m
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2.2 Analysing communication problems

Below are two very different responses to Case Study 1.

  1. The main cause of the ‘communication problem’ was the Bangladeshi woman’s poor grasp of spoken English, which meant she was unable to communicate her needs clearly or to understand what was being said to her during her stay in hospital. She probably lacked confidence in herself, either because of her language difficulties or because of her cultural background. Perhaps the hospital could have
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References

Ahmad, W.I.U. and Atkin, K. (eds) (1996) ‘Race’ and Community Care, Buckingham, Open University Press.
Alibhai-Brown, Y. (2000) Who do we think we are? Imagining the new Britain, London, The Penguin Press.
Beveridge, W.H. (1942) Social Insurance and Allied Services, Cmd 6404, London, HMSO.
Burchardt, T., Hills,
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1 What's in a title? An introduction

Because the words ‘care’, ‘welfare’ and ‘community’ are so much a part of everyday language and debate, there's perhaps an assumption that people agree about what they each mean. These are three words that mostly evoke warm and positive feelings. In Activity 1 you're asked to think about opposite points of view.

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References

Brown, H. and Smith, H. (1989) ‘Whose “ordinary life” is it anyway?’, Disability, Handicap and Society, Vol. 4, No. 2, pp.105–19.
Craft, A. and Brown, H. (1994) ‘Personal relationships and sexuality: the staff role’, in Craft, A. (ed.) Practical Issues in Sexuality and Learning Disabilities, Routledge, London, pp. 10–22.
Enfield Social Services (1
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1: Introducing Jim and Marianne

The lifestyles of long-term drug abusers are frequently sensationalised
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