Using Stress and Strain to Detect Cancer!
This module was written for a first year accelerated or AP physics class. It is intended to provide hands-on activities to teach the concepts of stress, strain and Hooke’s law. During the unit, students will apply the concepts learned through the lessons to solve the following engineering challenge: Breast cancer is the second-leading cause of cancer related death among women (Papas, 253) and the American Cancer Society has indicated that mammography is the best early-detection tool available.
Author(s): VU Bioengineering RET Program, School of Engineeri

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Copyright 2011 - VU Bioengineering RET Program, School of Engineering, Vanderbilt University,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

Data Plotting and Fitting
This Data Plotting and Fitting page was developed as a third year laboratory for the School of Physics, University of New South Wales. The program will plot data into several different graphs. Graphs include a line graph, linear regression fit, exponential fit, power fit, Gaussian fit and Cos squared fit. The program can also calculate fit for the data if required.
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Conservation Ecology: Lessons from the physics education reform effort
Starting in 1992, introductory physics students at Indiana University were pre- and post-tested on their knowledge of general physics. Some students received standard classes of lectures and tests, while others were taught using interactive engagement (IE) techniques. The goal of the study was this: can IE methods increase the effectiveness of introductory mechanics courses? Though the study focused on physics and mechanics specifically, the techniques used can be applied in teaching other scien
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ConcepTests
This site from SERC describes ConcepTests, which are conceptual multiple-choice questions that were originally designed by Eric Mazur at Harvard University for students in large physics classes. ConcepTests are generally short, and as they are multiple-choice, they are useful for immediate quantitative assessment of student understanding. It may be useful to the instructor to know how many correct responses there are to a question both before and after peer instruction to better gauge student un
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Soil Science and Technology Home Page
This site looks at soil fertility, nitrogen in soil, soil chemistry, soils as electrical systems, soils as filters, soil physics and particle sizes (silt, sand, and clay), microorganisms in soil, nutrients that plants need, soil morphology, judging soil by feel, structures and shapes of soil, and soil profile images from Arizona, Florida, Michigan, and other states. Learn how soil is formed and how long it takes to create an inch of soil.
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Radio JOVE in Your School
The concepts involved with Radio JOVE involve the interaction of moving charges with magnetic fields. The appropriate position within the course outline and the level that the material should be presented at are best determined by the teacher. What is provided here are some general descriptions of the topics and some suggestions about their integration into the science curriculum at the ninth grade (Physical Science and Earth Science) and twelfth grade (Physics) levels.
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Middle School Portal: Math and Science Pathways (MSP2)
This website is a great resource for information on bridges. The site provides links to websites like PBS's Nova, where you can learn about different types of bridges and then test your knowledge by matching the right bridge to the right location (over a freeway, river, canyon or ocean waterway), or where you can read more about the forces, loads and materials that affect bridges. Another link takes you to Better Bridges, where you can find out how many bridges are in your state. Definitely a gr
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Middle School Portal: Math and Science Pathways (MSP2)
This is a biographical sketch of William Hyde Wollaston. Wollaston studied and made advances in many scientific fields, including chemistry, physics, botany, crystallography, optics, astronomy and mineralogy. He is particularly noted for being the first to observe dark lines in the spectrum of the sun, discovering the elements palladium and rhodium, and proving the elementary nature of niobium and titanium. Wollaston also developed a method for making platinum metal malleable, establishing an eq
Author(s): Florida State University. National High Magnetic F

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Copyright 1995-2004 by Michael W. Davidson and The Florida State University. All Rights Reserved.

Confederate Cannon and Balls on Alabama State Capitol Grounds, Montgomery, Alabama
This image is a black and white photograph of a cannon and cannon balls located on the grounds of the Alabama State Capitol in Montgomery, Ala. Postcard text: (back) Confederate cannon and ball on Capitol grounds.
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This image is the property of the Auburn University Libraries and is intended for non-commercial use. Users of the image are asked to acknowledge the Auburn University Libraries. For information about

Caught from Municipal Pier, Fairhope, Alabama
This image is a black and white photograph of fish caught from the municipal pier in Fairhope, Ala. Handwritten message (on back) addressed to Prof. R.S. Mackintosh, St. Paul, Minn., postmarked February 8, 1941.
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This image is the property of the Auburn University Libraries and is intended for non-commercial use. Users of the image are asked to acknowledge the Auburn University Libraries. For information about

2.2 General features of higher-order nucleic acid structure

Polynucleotide chains are intrinsically flexible molecules and have the potential to form many different higher-order structures. Their flexibility derives from rotation around bonds in the sugar-phosphate backbone (Figure 3b). In vivo, the structures that form are obviously determined by both the proteins that synthesise the nucleic acid chains (polymerases) and the ancillary proteins that bind to and modify them. We will discuss these aspects of structure later in this unit. What dri
Author(s): The Open University

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Copyright © 2013 The Open University

Bush Science: Use and Abuse of Science in Policymaking
This event took place on Tuesday, October 12, 2004 in Wheeler Auditorium, UC Berkeley Featuring: * David Baltimore, President, Cal Tech and Nobel Laureate * Bruce C. Buckheit, Former director, EPA Air Enforcement Division * Andrew Eller, Biologist, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service * Kurt Gottfried, Chair, Union of Concerned Scientists and Professor of Physics at Cornell * Moderated by Michael Pollan, Knight Professor of Journalism
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Atmospheric Vertical Structure and the First Law of Thermodynamics
This sequential set of in-class and homework problems concerns applications of the First Law of Thermodynamics. In the homework, students are first asked to compute and plot potential temperatures of specified adiabats. In a second assignment, the potential temperature from an observed sounding is computed and plotted to develop a framework for understanding the stratification of the atmosphere. These activities are intended to help students discover the importance and utility of conservation pr
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Indoor Recess
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Optical Quantum Control
Explore an active area of research in optical physics: producing designer pulse shapes to achieve specific purposes, such as breaking apart a molecule. Carefully create the perfect shaped pulse to break apart a molecule by individually manipulating the colors of light that make up a pulse.
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Electric Field Hockey
Play hockey with electric charges. Place charges on the ice, then hit start to try to get the puck in the goal. View the electric field. Trace the puck's motion. Make the game harder by placing walls in front of the goal. This is a clone of the popular simulation of the same name marketed by Physics Academic Software and written by Prof. Ruth Chabay of the Dept of Physics at North Carolina State University.
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David Kinch, "Manresa" | Chefs at Google
David Kinch has forged a distinctive culinary path putting him at the forefront of new contemporary California cuisine. His philosophy is fostered by the terroir, or "sense of place" of the California Coast, and the kind of ingredient-driven cooking and modern technique he studied around the world. Influenced by French and modern Catalan cooking, Kinch finds inspiration from European traditions and refinement, American ingenuity, and the vast bounty California offers. His pursuit for exceptional
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Calculus-Based Physics
Calculus-Based Physics is an introductory physics textbook designed for use in the two-semester introductory physics course typically taken by science and engineering students.
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Physics Games: Laser
Play a game and find out about a Nobel Prize awarded discovery or work! Has it ever occurred to you that every time you listen to a CD or point with a laser pointer, you are holding the discovery of a Nobel Prize Laureate in Physics in your hand?
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Physics Games: Invar® and Steel Alloys
Play a game and find out about a Nobel Prize awarded discovery or work! Alloys are mixtures of substances in which the resulting material has metallic properties. They are usually produced by melting the mixture of ingredients. Steel, brass and amalgam are a few examples of an alloy. Invar, from the word "invariable", is a special steel alloy - used today in toasters and CRT-monitors for example. The Swiss physicist Charles Edouard Guillaume was awarded the 1920 Nobel Prize in Physics for discov
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