Quantum Information Processing
Quantum Information Processing aims at harnessing quantum physics to conceive and build devices that could dramatically exceed the capabilities of today's "classical" computation and communication systems. In this course, we will introduce the basic concepts of this rapidly developing field.
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Researchers "buzz" the brain to speed up learning
Subscribe: http://smarturl.it/reuterssubscribe Apr. 8 - Researchers at Vanderbilt University are developing technology that could increase the speed at which we learn. In trials, they ran mild electric current through the brains of volunteers and say the results demonstrated an increase in the rate at which they were able to learn. Ben Gruber reports. More Innovations: http://smarturl.it/Innovations Subscribe: http://smarturl.it/reuterssubscribe Reuters tells the world's stories like no one e
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How To Add Explosive Power To Your Soccer Moves
Soccer Coach Mike Hefron demonstrates how to add explosive power to your beat-the-man moves on the soccer field in just 6 weeks.
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Keep on learning

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Copyright © 2016 The Open University

"Theory of Solids II, Spring 2009"
" This is the second term of a theoretical treatment of the physics of solids. Topics covered include linear response theory; the physics of disorder; superconductivity; the local moment and itinerant magnetism; the Kondo problem and Fermi liquid theory."
Author(s): Lee, Patrick

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Rights not set

Physics in Action: Resonance
Professor Ephraim Fischbach demonstrates resonance in this video from Thinkwell's online Physics in Action series. The video uses lecture format and demonstrations to aid in the explanation of resonance and frequency.  Run time 04:59.
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Physics is Fun to Imagine
In this archival footage from BBC TV, celebrated physicist Richard Feynman explains what fire, magnets, rubber bands (and more) are like at the scale of the jiggling atoms they're made of. This accessible, enchanting conversation in physics reveals a teeming nano-world that's just plain fun to imagine. Run time 07:06.
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Electromagnets
This video is a high school physics project that includes clear audio explanations about electromagnets and electro magnetic energy. This applies to generators, electromagnets, solenoids, and speakers. The video gives you a very specific examples: how a stereo speaker works, a magnetic toy, . Run time 8:08.
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Visualization of Einstein's Special Relativity
This video demonstrates the effects of Einstein's special relativity on objects that move at high velocities. It shows a 3-dimensional view containing 2 dimensions of space and one dimension of time. This view is used to demonstrate the difference between classical physics and Einstein's relativity. No audio. Run time 02:30.
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Velocity and Time
Unlike Lorentz, Albert Einstein was motivated to perfect the central ideas of physics rather than to explain the Michelson-Morley experiment. The result was a wholly new understanding of the meaning of space and time, including such matters as the transformation of velocities, time dilation, and the twin paradox.
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Learning As We Grow: Development and Learning
This 30 minute program examines the concept of readiness for learning and illustrates how developmental pathways — including physical, cognitive, and linguistic — all play a part in students’ learning. Featured are a first-grade teacher, a seventh- and eighth-grade science teacher, and a senior physics teacher. Some classroom examples shown.
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Aristotle Part 4
Aristotle is one of the most important founding figures in
Western philosophy. He was the first to create a comprehensive system of Western philosophy, encompassing morality and aesthetics, logic and science, politics and metaphysics. Aristotle's views on the physical sciences profoundly shaped medieval scholarship, and their influence extended well into the Renaissance, although they were ultimately replaced by modern physics. In the biological sciences, some of his observations were only

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Expansion and Contraction
Using balloons to illustrate the process, Eureka! shows how, when matter gets hot, its molecules go faster and the solid, liquid, or gas expands. Conversely, when matter gets cold, its molecules go slower, and the solid, liquid, or gas contracts. Eureka was a series of short cartoons on physics that ran on public television in the 1980's.  The video explains the concept in simple and well illustrated way.  Good for students of any elementary school level.
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Interactive Teaching Methods
Chandralekha Singh shows examples of interactive teaching methods in her High School Physics II class. Watch her teach and listen as she and her students elaborate on the different strategies she uses. Run time 03:50.
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Meet the Supermassive Black Hole Experts

Meet the experts of possibly the scariest phenomenon in the universe - super massive black holes. Described as gravity gone mad, whole solar systems can be sucked into these terrifying masses. Supermassive black holes are a million to a billion times the massive of a typical black hole.  They could fill a solar system.  At the heart of a supermassive black hole is one of the most mysterious things to physics, it is a singularity, wh
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Devils Tower
The video shows an intrusive volcanic tower. It explains how the volcano was formed. Introduction is a little silly. This video is a high school physics project. Grades 7-12. 2:29 min.
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The World of Biophysics
In this Wichita State University program, Don Lamb, professor of physical chemistry at Ludwig University of Munich, delivers a lecture on the biophysics. Dr. Lamb explains the history of biophysics and how the intersection of biology and physics helps to explain living systems. Lamb discusses his research into the world of biophysics and fluorescence. Grades 10-12. 58:56 min.
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The History of Mathematics - BBC
Mathematics is the Empress of the Sciences. Without her, there would be no physics, nor chemistry, nor cosmology. Any field of study depending on statistics, geometry, or any kind of calculation would simply cease to be. And then, there are the practical applications: without math there would be no architecture. No commerce. No accurate maps, or time-keeping: therefore no navigation, nor aviation, nor astronomy.

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Conduction
Eureka! looks at the process of conduction, explaining that the application of heat to an object makes the molecules or atoms vibrate faster and cause a sort of "domino effect."  Eureka was a series of short cartoons on physics that ran on public television in the 1980's.  The video explains the concept in simple and well illustrated way.  Good for students of any elementary school level. 
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Eureka! Convection Episode 27
This program explains how the principle of buoyancy is responsible for the process of heat transfer called convection. Eureka was a series of short cartoons on physics that ran on public television in the 1980's.  The video explains the concept in simple and well illustrated way.  Good for students of any elementary school level.
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