5.1 Overview
Scattering is fundamental to almost everything we know about the world, such as why the sky is blue. Tunnelling is entirely quantum-mechanical and gives rise to such phenomena as nuclear fusion in stars. Examples and applications of both these fascinating concepts are investigated in this unit.
Author(s): The Open University

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4.4 Stationary states and tunnelling in one dimension
Scattering is fundamental to almost everything we know about the world, such as why the sky is blue. Tunnelling is entirely quantum-mechanical and gives rise to such phenomena as nuclear fusion in stars. Examples and applications of both these fascinating concepts are investigated in this unit.
Author(s): The Open University

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4.3 Stationary states and barrier penetration
Scattering is fundamental to almost everything we know about the world, such as why the sky is blue. Tunnelling is entirely quantum-mechanical and gives rise to such phenomena as nuclear fusion in stars. Examples and applications of both these fascinating concepts are investigated in this unit.
Author(s): The Open University

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4.2 Wave packets and tunnelling in one dimension
Scattering is fundamental to almost everything we know about the world, such as why the sky is blue. Tunnelling is entirely quantum-mechanical and gives rise to such phenomena as nuclear fusion in stars. Examples and applications of both these fascinating concepts are investigated in this unit.
Author(s): The Open University

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4.1 Overview
Scattering is fundamental to almost everything we know about the world, such as why the sky is blue. Tunnelling is entirely quantum-mechanical and gives rise to such phenomena as nuclear fusion in stars. Examples and applications of both these fascinating concepts are investigated in this unit.
Author(s): The Open University

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3.6 Scattering in three dimensions
Scattering is fundamental to almost everything we know about the world, such as why the sky is blue. Tunnelling is entirely quantum-mechanical and gives rise to such phenomena as nuclear fusion in stars. Examples and applications of both these fascinating concepts are investigated in this unit.
Author(s): The Open University

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3.5 Scattering from finite square wells and barriers
Scattering is fundamental to almost everything we know about the world, such as why the sky is blue. Tunnelling is entirely quantum-mechanical and gives rise to such phenomena as nuclear fusion in stars. Examples and applications of both these fascinating concepts are investigated in this unit.
Author(s): The Open University

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3.4 Probability currents
Scattering is fundamental to almost everything we know about the world, such as why the sky is blue. Tunnelling is entirely quantum-mechanical and gives rise to such phenomena as nuclear fusion in stars. Examples and applications of both these fascinating concepts are investigated in this unit.
Author(s): The Open University

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3.3 Scattering from a finite square step
Scattering is fundamental to almost everything we know about the world, such as why the sky is blue. Tunnelling is entirely quantum-mechanical and gives rise to such phenomena as nuclear fusion in stars. Examples and applications of both these fascinating concepts are investigated in this unit.
Author(s): The Open University

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3.2 Stationary states and scattering in one dimension
Scattering is fundamental to almost everything we know about the world, such as why the sky is blue. Tunnelling is entirely quantum-mechanical and gives rise to such phenomena as nuclear fusion in stars. Examples and applications of both these fascinating concepts are investigated in this unit.
Author(s): The Open University

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Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2

3.1 Overview
Scattering is fundamental to almost everything we know about the world, such as why the sky is blue. Tunnelling is entirely quantum-mechanical and gives rise to such phenomena as nuclear fusion in stars. Examples and applications of both these fascinating concepts are investigated in this unit.
Author(s): The Open University

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Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2

2.2 Wave packets and scattering in one dimension
Scattering is fundamental to almost everything we know about the world, such as why the sky is blue. Tunnelling is entirely quantum-mechanical and gives rise to such phenomena as nuclear fusion in stars. Examples and applications of both these fascinating concepts are investigated in this unit.
Author(s): The Open University

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2.1 Overview
Scattering is fundamental to almost everything we know about the world, such as why the sky is blue. Tunnelling is entirely quantum-mechanical and gives rise to such phenomena as nuclear fusion in stars. Examples and applications of both these fascinating concepts are investigated in this unit.
Author(s): The Open University

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1 What are scattering and tunnelling?
Scattering is fundamental to almost everything we know about the world, such as why the sky is blue. Tunnelling is entirely quantum-mechanical and gives rise to such phenomena as nuclear fusion in stars. Examples and applications of both these fascinating concepts are investigated in this unit.
Author(s): The Open University

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Learning outcomes
Scattering is fundamental to almost everything we know about the world, such as why the sky is blue. Tunnelling is entirely quantum-mechanical and gives rise to such phenomena as nuclear fusion in stars. Examples and applications of both these fascinating concepts are investigated in this unit.
Author(s): The Open University

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Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

Acknowledgements
One of the most important technologies in use today is also one of the smallest. The microchip was invented in Scotland in 1947 and is now at the heart of the electronics industry. This unit uses video clips to explore how the microchip is made and how it works, and to predict the future of this incredible technology.
Author(s): The Open University

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Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

Learning outcomes
One of the most important technologies in use today is also one of the smallest. The microchip was invented in Scotland in 1947 and is now at the heart of the electronics industry. This unit uses video clips to explore how the microchip is made and how it works, and to predict the future of this incredible technology.
Author(s): The Open University

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Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

IPL: Aesthetics and astronomy: What do we see?
Professor Lisa Smith, College of Education, Inaugural Professorial Lecture, given on March 11, 2009.
Author(s): No creator set

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IPL: Aesthetics and astronomy: What do we see?
Professor Lisa Smith, College of Education, Inaugural Professorial Lecture, given on March 11, 2009.
Author(s): No creator set

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The Paul Callaghan Interviews: Andrew Wilson
This interview is part of a series undertaken in 2007 and 2007 by Paul Callaghan of the MacDiarmid Institute, as part of a project entitled "beyond the Farm and the Theme Park". Andrew Wilson is a physicist at the University of Otago, an expert in lasers, optics and their application to the study of cold atoms. He leads a small spin-out company called Photonic Innovations.
Author(s): No creator set

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