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1.6. Listening, reading and language assimilation

One assumption that is widely held as axiomatic is that people learn by doing … We seem to have deduced that people learn to speak by speaking and so on. In reality one simply drowns by attempting to swim without some sort of prior preparation and theoretical instruction. Obviously the art of speaking can be improved by practice but the skill of speaking is learnt primarily in a vast complex of other ways. It might be su
Author(s): The Open University

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References

Bills, C. (2002) ‘Mental mathematics’ in Haggarty, L. (ed.), Aspects of Teaching Secondary Mathematics: Perspectives on Practice, London, Routledge.
Mason, J. (1988) ‘Imagery, imagination and mathematics classrooms’ in Pimm, D. (ed.), Mathematics, Teachers and Children, Sevenoaks, Hodder and Stoughton.
The Open University (1988) ME234 Using Mathemati
Author(s): The Open University

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5. Conclusion

I hope you now have a better idea of what it means to visualise a piece of mathematics.

Visualising is a critically important process when mathematicians and others actually do mathematics. Unfortunately, the process of visualising does not appear in publications, which all tend to be displayed very formally and are mostly restricted to the final results.

As teachers we need to ensure that we are very aware of all the processes of mathematics and so we must always attempt to know
Author(s): The Open University

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1.2 What is a ‘career’?

Understanding the key terms in CEG is vital to understanding your role in it. Very few students go into full-time jobs at 16 and the concept of ‘career’ as a job for life is irrelevant to the twenty-first century labour market. Click on 'View document' below to read a careers overview, which explores this further.

2.4 Achieving targets

Setting tasks at the end of the mentor session each week may appear, on the surface, a fairly simple task compared to the previous in-depth discussion and evaluation of teaching that will have taken place. Targets may be viewed as providing a sense of momentum and achievement during the school experience placement as those set one week can be ticked off the next. However, is it really as simple as that? What should a mentor do if the student teacher is not achieving the targets set? In the fi
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2.3.2 Synthesis

  • Look at the lesson as a whole in relation to the agreed focus.

  • Draw together an overall picture of the lesson where the identified strengths and suggested needs for change are all represented.

  • Help the student teacher to identify connections and possible misconceptions.


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2.3 Co-analysis of practice

Carrying out observations of the student teacher is an important part of mentor activity and one of the major ways that mentors gather evidence to improve practice. Observations are most useful when they are followed by an opportunity for the mentor and student teacher to debrief the session, consider the implications of what happened and set targets for further development. This process of observation and debriefing is called co-analysis of practice.

Observations provide evidence for f
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1.2 The mentor role in the OU flexible PGCE

What makes a good mentor? Student teachers and mentors generally agree that the good mentor is approachable; offers encouragement; has the ability to listen; gives constructive feedback; and challenges thinking. It is also important that both the mentor and the student teacher have a good understanding of the programme – the aims, assessment and timing of activities.


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Displacement Week: "The Effects of Gentrification on Chicago's Communities" (video)
A panel discussion with Jamie Kalven: Writer, Invisible Institute; Tom Walsh: Director of Advocacy and Public Policy, Jewish Council on Urban Affiars; Victoria Romero: President of the Board, Pilsen Alliance. Moderated by Virginia Parks: Assistant Professor, School of Social Service Administration, University of Chicago.
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Rights not set

Distintas citas de personas famosas

Actividad 9

En esta actividad va a leer distintas citas de personas famosas. Utilice un diccionario bilingüe si encuentra palabras que no entiende.

1 Lea las siguientes citas y utilice las palabras que aparecen en el recuad
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Varios estudiantes de Bellas Artes

Actividad 3

En esta actividad va a escuchar a varios estudiantes de Bellas Artes explicar lo que es para ellos el arte.

1 Como se trata de una conversación informal en la que los participantes se interrumpen mutuamente, emp
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Manifestaciones artísticas

Actividad 2

Acaba de ver el tipo de manifestaciones artísticas que les gustan a varias personas. Ahora le pasamos la palabra a dos artistas argentinos para que definan lo que significa el arte para ellos.

1 Escuche las pist
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8.5 Actividad

Actividad 8.4

Vocabulario

en el campo in
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2.5.4 Activités 30 et 31

Activité 30

Listen to people talking about dates in the French calendar. Note the dates of the events in the table below.

Écoutez et notez les dates:


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Learning outcomes

After studying this unit you will be able to:

  • understand and give information on a French town;

  • seek clarification on where to stay and things to do;

  • deal confidently with numbers and tell the time;

  • see a development in your oral fluency and reading skills.


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3 Welfare

Earlier, in Activity 1, some contrasting associations with the word ‘welfare’ emerged. Just to remind you, they were:

Positive: concern, happiness, prosperity, wellbeing, success, profit, support, safety-net, sharing, goodwill, concern, benefit, provision.

Negative: needy, failing, controlling, labelling, deserving, denying, official, not managing, stigma, shame, poverty, idleness, fecklessness, scrounging, hand-outs, charity, demeaning, benefits.

From one
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1 Attachment to place

In this unit we are going to consider the way in which people identify and become attached to places, buildings, objects, and how this attachment can contribute to personal well-being or how we feel about ourselves (Low and Altman, 1992). Looking at why places become important provides a basis for asking questions about what happens when people have to move, a common occurrence for people in need of care services.

The purpose of this unit is to focus on the psychological environment, ho
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1 Caring: a family affair

Dream parents

Mummy would love me, daddy would too,

We'd go out on picnics or off to the zoo,

We would play in the park and feed the birds,

Listen to their songs and imagine their words.

My life would be full of joy and laughter,

All because they cared, my mother and father,

Never would I feel all cold and alone,

Knowing that I could always go home.

They wo
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Learning outcomes

On completion of this unit, you should be able to:

  • understand how minority communities require different types of support from caring agencies.


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5.1 Children's rights

Initial information about the Palmer family

The story of the Palmer family is presented in the audio below, and it provides material about working with families. The case study is a dramatic presentation of a reconstituted family consisting of three generations living in the same household. During th
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