Politics in 60 seconds. Passive revolution
Dr Adam Morton defines a polical concept in 60 seconds for those with a spare minute to learn something new. This videocast focuses on passive revolution as a political concept. Warning: video does contain bloopers and out takes. May 2010 Suitable for Undergraduate study and Community education Dr Adam Morton, School of Politics and International Relations Dr Adam Morton is a Senior Lecturer and Fellow of the Centre for the Study of Social and Global Justice (CSSGJ) in the School of Politic
Author(s): Morton A. D. Dr

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References

Ahmed, K. (1995) ‘Glasgow reputations: powerful case for the prosecution’, Scotland on Sunday, 13 August.
Au, O. (1995) ‘Midsummer madness makes one Mean City’, The Sunday Times Scotland, 13 August.
Allardyce, J. (1995) ‘Smiling through’, The Scotsman, 8 August.
Bolitho, W. (1924) Cancer of Empire
Author(s): The Open University

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STS.038 Energy and Environment in American History: 1705-2005 (MIT)
A survey of how America has become the world's largest consumer of energy. Explores American history from the perspective of energy and its relationship to politics, diplomacy, the economy, science and technology, labor, culture, and the environment. Topics include muscle and water power in early America, coal and the Industrial Revolution, electrification, energy consumption in the home, oil and U.S. foreign policy, automobiles and suburbanization, nuclear power, OPEC and the 70's energy crisis
Author(s): Shulman, Peter

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The Nature of Money [Audio]
Speaker(s): Professor Philip Goodchild, Dr Waltraud Schelkle, Susan Steed | What is money, where does it come from, and why does it sometimes fail to make us better off? The banality of money makes it appear neutral with respect to political, religious, or moral values. Should we try to answer these questions in a value-neutral way, or does money shelter a value system hiding in plain sight? Philip Goodchild is Professor of Religion and Philosophy at the University of Nottingham. Waltraud Schelk
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Thomas Burns Memorial Lectures 2016: Professor Choon-Leong Seow - The Story of Job: A contested clas
The Department of Theology and Religion presents lecture two of the 2016 Thomas Burns Memorial Lecture series. Given by Professor Choon-Leong Seow, Vanderbilt Divinity School, this presentation covers the topic 'The Artistry of the (Hebrew) Book of Job'. 27 July 2016
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Digital Library Object - Relevancy of tactical nuclear weapons in Europe in the post Cold-War era.
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Politics in 60 seconds. Corruption
Professor Paul Heywood defines a polical concept in 60 seconds for those with a spare minute to learn something new. This videocast focuses on corruption as a political concept. Warning: video does contain bloopers and out takes. May 2010 Suitable for Undergraduate study and community education Professor Paul Heywood, School of Politics and International Relations Professor Paul Heywood is Sir Francis Hill Professor of European Politics. He graduated with an MA in Politics (First Class) fro
Author(s): Heywood P. M. Professor

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Special Lecture 03 - 11/24/2010
Special Lecture 03
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Politics in 60 seconds
This video is the introductory trailer for a series of videos which capture political experts at The University of Nottingham rising to the challenge of defining a political concept in 60 seconds. Warning this video will contain bloopers The School of Politics and International Relations
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21H.311 The Renaissance, 1300-1600 (MIT)
The "Renaissance" as a phenomenon in European history is best understood as a series of social, political, and cultural responses to an intellectual trend which began in Italy in the fourteenth century. This intellectual tendency, known as humanism, or the studia humanitatis, was at the heart of developments in literature, the arts, the sciences, religion, and government for almost three hundred years. In this class, we will highlight the history of humanism, but we will also study rel
Author(s): Ravel, Jeffrey S.

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3.2 Consciousness of the body

Phenomenological theorists distinguish between the subjective body (as lived and experienced) and the objective body (as observed and scientifically investigated). These are not two different bodies as such (phenomenologists pride themselves on overcoming dualisms!); rather they are different facets of our experience and consciousness.

The body-subject, or subjective body, is the body-as-it-is-lived. I do not simply possess a body; I am my body (Merleau-Ponty, 1962
Author(s): The Open University

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17.960 Foundations of Political Science (MIT)
This course continues from the fall semester. The course introduces students to the fundamental theories and methods of modern political science through the study of a small number of major books and articles that have been influential in the field. This semester, the course focuses on American and comparative politics.
Author(s): Petersen, Roger

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2.1 The development of gender identity

In this section we are going to look at where we come from in terms of childhood experience and the development of gender identities in childhood. Gender identity involves the construction and use of gender categories. Children's gender categories are at first rather simplistic; but, as we shall see, children refine their categories so that they become more reliable and useful for their social lives. Studying the development of gender identity in children reveals that this is a story of a sea
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Conclusion

Earthquakes shake the ground surface, can cause buildings to collapse, disrupt transport and services, and can cause fires. They can trigger landslides and tsunami.

Earthquakes occur mainly as a result of plate tectonics, which involves blocks of the Earth moving about the Earth's surface. The blocks of rock move past each other along a fault. Smaller earthquakes, called foreshocks, may precede the main earthquake, and aftershocks may occur after the main earthquake. Earthquakes are mai
Author(s): The Open University

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1.2 Who am I?

Let us start with an example of an individual and his identity which illustrates the link between the personal and the social. The social scientist Madan Sarup uses the example of his passport, which gives information about his identity in an official sense. Our passports name, describe and place us. A passport describes an individual; it names one person. It also states to which group, in particular which nation, that person belongs:

Author(s): The Open University

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Itse1359-2245-Color-Explanation of the HSV Color Space
R.G. (Dick) Baldwin
This module explains the HSV color space.
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Mythbusters- Walking on "Water"
The mythbusters are making oobleck. It's a simple mixture of water and cornstarch. It's easy to make in small batches (04:31).
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Sugars in human mother’s milk are non-toxic antibacterial agents
A new study has found that sugars in mother's' milk do not just provide nutrition for babies but also help protect them from bacterial infections.
Author(s): David Salisbury

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2.11 Further reading

Grice's writing on the philosophy of language, including the 1957 paper ‘Meaning’, is collected in Grice 1989. Discussion of the issues raised in ‘Meaning’ can be found in Avramides 1997 (the most accessible), Blackburn 1984, Miller 1998, and Taylor 1998. A defence of the Gricean Programme can be found in Schiffer 1972, later retracted in Schiffer 1987. Searle's position is developed at length in Searle 1969.


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