Special Lecture 03 - 11/24/2010
Special Lecture 03
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Politics in 60 seconds
This video is the introductory trailer for a series of videos which capture political experts at The University of Nottingham rising to the challenge of defining a political concept in 60 seconds. Warning this video will contain bloopers The School of Politics and International Relations
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Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by

21H.311 The Renaissance, 1300-1600 (MIT)
The "Renaissance" as a phenomenon in European history is best understood as a series of social, political, and cultural responses to an intellectual trend which began in Italy in the fourteenth century. This intellectual tendency, known as humanism, or the studia humanitatis, was at the heart of developments in literature, the arts, the sciences, religion, and government for almost three hundred years. In this class, we will highlight the history of humanism, but we will also study rel
Author(s): Ravel, Jeffrey S.

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3.2 Consciousness of the body

Phenomenological theorists distinguish between the subjective body (as lived and experienced) and the objective body (as observed and scientifically investigated). These are not two different bodies as such (phenomenologists pride themselves on overcoming dualisms!); rather they are different facets of our experience and consciousness.

The body-subject, or subjective body, is the body-as-it-is-lived. I do not simply possess a body; I am my body (Merleau-Ponty, 1962
Author(s): The Open University

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17.960 Foundations of Political Science (MIT)
This course continues from the fall semester. The course introduces students to the fundamental theories and methods of modern political science through the study of a small number of major books and articles that have been influential in the field. This semester, the course focuses on American and comparative politics.
Author(s): Petersen, Roger

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2.1 The development of gender identity

In this section we are going to look at where we come from in terms of childhood experience and the development of gender identities in childhood. Gender identity involves the construction and use of gender categories. Children's gender categories are at first rather simplistic; but, as we shall see, children refine their categories so that they become more reliable and useful for their social lives. Studying the development of gender identity in children reveals that this is a story of a sea
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Conclusion

Earthquakes shake the ground surface, can cause buildings to collapse, disrupt transport and services, and can cause fires. They can trigger landslides and tsunami.

Earthquakes occur mainly as a result of plate tectonics, which involves blocks of the Earth moving about the Earth's surface. The blocks of rock move past each other along a fault. Smaller earthquakes, called foreshocks, may precede the main earthquake, and aftershocks may occur after the main earthquake. Earthquakes are mai
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1.2 Who am I?

Let us start with an example of an individual and his identity which illustrates the link between the personal and the social. The social scientist Madan Sarup uses the example of his passport, which gives information about his identity in an official sense. Our passports name, describe and place us. A passport describes an individual; it names one person. It also states to which group, in particular which nation, that person belongs:

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Itse1359-2245-Color-Explanation of the HSV Color Space
R.G. (Dick) Baldwin
This module explains the HSV color space.
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Mythbusters- Walking on "Water"
The mythbusters are making oobleck. It's a simple mixture of water and cornstarch. It's easy to make in small batches (04:31).
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Sugars in human mother’s milk are non-toxic antibacterial agents
A new study has found that sugars in mother's' milk do not just provide nutrition for babies but also help protect them from bacterial infections.
Author(s): David Salisbury

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2.11 Further reading

Grice's writing on the philosophy of language, including the 1957 paper ‘Meaning’, is collected in Grice 1989. Discussion of the issues raised in ‘Meaning’ can be found in Avramides 1997 (the most accessible), Blackburn 1984, Miller 1998, and Taylor 1998. A defence of the Gricean Programme can be found in Schiffer 1972, later retracted in Schiffer 1987. Searle's position is developed at length in Searle 1969.


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2.2 A society frightened by crime?

We do not have to look too far to find someone saying that the UK is a society gripped by rising levels of crime, anti-social behaviour and incivility; or that disorder threatens social stability. The criminologist Robert Reiner suggests that ‘in the last 40 years, we have got used to thinking of crime, like the weather and pop music, as something that is always getting worse’ (Reiner, 1996, p. 3). So who is telling this story?

Most of us will have heard older family members and fri
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Dach blog
Dach is a blog which keeps readers updated on the British Library's German collections. It also discusses wider issues connected with German, Austrian and German Swiss culture, politics and literature. The authors - Clemens Gresser, Susan Reed and Dorothea Miehe - are all librarians at the British Library. Some blog postings also give a more personal perspective on issues relating to German culture and everyday work issues. For example, a recent post talked about German elections and how the
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2.2 The organisation: loyalty cards

Many supermarkets and other firms (such as petrol companies and airlines) use loyalty cards: cards that offer a customer some form of incentive, such as a future discount or gift, to continue buying from that firm. For example, the British supermarket chain Tesco issues such cards. The holder of a loyalty card is regularly sent vouchers which give the holder discounts from their shopping bills and also vouchers which enable them to gain a discount on items that the supermarket wishes to promo
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6.2 Days and time

The separating out of a special day or time in the week runs in parallel with the marking out of a space that is set aside for worship, ritual and communal activity (material dimension). The place where a religious community gathers speaks powerfully about the convictions shared by its members.

This is nowhere more evident than in the Author(s): The Open University

Virtual Maths - Shapes, Space and Measure, Theodolite Survey simulation
Simulation of using a thodolite to calculate the height of a building.
Author(s): Leeds Metropolitan University

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7.5 Religion: a ‘good’ thing or a ‘bad’ thing?

In considering the value of religions, we can begin by saying that one of the first tasks of the critical student should certainly be to test the basis of judgements offered by other commentators. We saw earlier that the Church of Scientology has had problems gaining official recognition as a ‘religion’ in
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Try some yourself

Activity 6

What is 370.76 grams in kilograms? There are 1000 grams in a kilogram.

Answer

370.76 ÷ 1000 = 0.370 76.

So 370.76 g = 0.370
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